Video: I’m a T-Shirt Maker With Gay Customers and Gay Employees. I Still Was Sued.

COMMENTARY Religious Liberty

Video: I’m a T-Shirt Maker With Gay Customers and Gay Employees. I Still Was Sued.

Dec 1st, 2017 1 min read
COMMENTARY BY

Former Research Assistant

Monica Burke was a research assistant in the DeVos Center for Religion and Civil Society at The Heritage Foundation.
Photo by: iStock

The following video is based on the story of Blaine Adamson. Anderson founded his T-shirt printing business, Hands On Originals, because he wanted to create Christian shirts that people actually would wear. In 2012. Adamson was sued for discrimination when he declined an order for shirts to promote a local gay festival. A judge and an appeals court both ruled in Adamson’s favor, but now the government has appealed to the Kentucky Supreme Court.

 

Adamson serves gay customers and employs gay people, but he could not fill this order in good conscience. He had turned down orders before that violated his beliefs, including a shirt with the text “Homosexuality is a sin,” because he believes it was “not how Jesus would have handled the issue.”

 

Adamson’s beliefs about marriage do not mean he discriminates against LGBT people. Like Jack Phillips, Adamson only requests that the government not force him to promote messages against his convictions.