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Russia

Our Research & Offerings on Russia
  • Commentary posted March 31, 2014 by Kim R. Holmes, Ph.D. Obama fails the Crimea Rorschach test

    Think of the Ukraine crisis as a Rorschach test. Russia has shown President Obama an inkblot that looks like a bear, and all he sees is a frightened rabbit. Vladimir Putin’s designs on Ukraine could not be clearer. Yet Mr. Obama clings to the notion that Moscow is motivated by weakness and fear. Russia is acting, he says, “not out of strength, but out of weakness,”…

  • Commentary posted March 30, 2014 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. Free nations should band together to promote shared values

    Americans wanted to know how the president planned to end the Great War and prevent the next one. And so, on September 27, 1918, Woodrow Wilson took to the stage of the Metropolitan Opera House. There, amid the beaux arts glitter and gilt, he declared that what the world needed was a League of Nations. The president expected it to be the speech of his life, but he was…

  • Issue Brief posted March 28, 2014 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D., Nile Gardiner, Ph.D., Luke Coffey, Dakota Wood If Russia Attacks: How the U.S. Should Respond to Further Aggression Against Ukraine

    After Russia’s illegal invasion, occupation, and subsequent annexation of Crimea, there is a concern that Moscow will not stop until all of Ukraine is under Russia’s control. By invading Crimea, the regime of President Vladimir Putin has made it impossible any longer to consider Russia a responsible nation or suitable partner for the United States in solving regional and…

  • Commentary posted March 28, 2014 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. Five Reasons Cold War II Isn't Happening

    At a press conference in the Hague, President Obama dismissed the suggestion that Mitt Romney had been right in 2012 to peg Moscow as America’s top strategic challenge. "The truth of the matter is that America's got a whole lot of challenges,” Mr. Obama said. “Russia is a regional power that is threatening some of its immediate neighbors, not out of strength but out of…

  • Commentary posted March 28, 2014 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. Jet-setting Obama can't flee foreign policy failures

    Having done his darndest in The Hague, Barack Obama is taking his “cast of 100s” caravan to the sands of the Saudis. Riyadh may seem a strange place to end a European tour, but Mr. Obama often does the unexpected. What he does not do when travelling, however, is deal directly with the really bad stuff. Even at The Hague, as tens of thousands of Russian troops massed…

  • Issue Brief posted March 27, 2014 by Michaela Dodge U.S. Nuclear Weapons Policy: After Ukraine, Time to Reassess Strategic Posture

    Russia recently invaded Ukraine and annexed Crimea in blatant disregard of Ukraine’s territorial sovereignty. Russia’s willingness to challenge the status quo and its disregard for its arms control obligations have important implications for U.S. nuclear weapons policy. The U.S. can take many steps to improve and strengthen its overall nuclear posture regardless of…

  • Commentary posted March 27, 2014 by Luke Coffey After Crimea

    Not since the Cold War has Red Square hosted such an alarming spectacle. When Russian president Vladimir Putin gathered a crowd of thousands to celebrate his military annexation of Crimea last week, he demonstrated a now-familiar talent for merging stagecraft with statecraft. Flanked by four Jumbotrons and capped by the dubious proclamation “We are together,” Putin’s…

  • Commentary posted March 27, 2014 by Peter Brookes Will Putin’s bad-boy routine help Obama, Kerry see the light?

    If there’s one good thing to come out of the Crimea crisis so far – if that’s possible – it’s that Russia’s land-grab may have roused Team Obama from its strategic slumber about emerging big power threats. Startled by the Kremlin’s unexpected wake-up call, maybe now the White House will wipe away the “sleepies” and see the world as it is, rather than how Team Obama…

  • Backgrounder posted March 25, 2014 by Nile Gardiner, Ph.D., Jack Spencer, Luke Coffey, Nicolas Loris Beyond the Crimea Crisis: Comprehensive Next Steps in U.S.–Russian Relations

    After three months of mass street demonstrations, the Ukrainian people succeeded in ousting their corrupt and incompetent president, the Kremlin-backed Viktor Yanukovych. On February 22, the Ukrainian parliament acted in favor of the people it represents by granting amnesty to all political prisoners, bringing back the constitution of 2004 (which reduces the powers of the…

  • Commentary posted March 25, 2014 by Kim R. Holmes, Ph.D. A Cold War Lesson For Ukraine

    There's been a lot of talk about how Russia's invasion of Crimea means a return to the Cold War. History never repeats itself exactly (it merely echoes). But there are actually some lessons from the Cold War which could be applicable to the crisis in Ukraine. The first is that facts on the ground matter. The Soviet Union occupied half of Europe after World War II more or…

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  • Backgrounder posted March 25, 2014 by Nile Gardiner, Ph.D., Jack Spencer, Luke Coffey, Nicolas Loris Beyond the Crimea Crisis: Comprehensive Next Steps in U.S.–Russian Relations

    After three months of mass street demonstrations, the Ukrainian people succeeded in ousting their corrupt and incompetent president, the Kremlin-backed Viktor Yanukovych. On February 22, the Ukrainian parliament acted in favor of the people it represents by granting amnesty to all political prisoners, bringing back the constitution of 2004 (which reduces the powers of the…

  • Issue Brief posted March 28, 2014 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D., Nile Gardiner, Ph.D., Luke Coffey, Dakota Wood If Russia Attacks: How the U.S. Should Respond to Further Aggression Against Ukraine

    After Russia’s illegal invasion, occupation, and subsequent annexation of Crimea, there is a concern that Moscow will not stop until all of Ukraine is under Russia’s control. By invading Crimea, the regime of President Vladimir Putin has made it impossible any longer to consider Russia a responsible nation or suitable partner for the United States in solving regional and…

  • Issue Brief posted March 27, 2014 by Michaela Dodge U.S. Nuclear Weapons Policy: After Ukraine, Time to Reassess Strategic Posture

    Russia recently invaded Ukraine and annexed Crimea in blatant disregard of Ukraine’s territorial sovereignty. Russia’s willingness to challenge the status quo and its disregard for its arms control obligations have important implications for U.S. nuclear weapons policy. The U.S. can take many steps to improve and strengthen its overall nuclear posture regardless of…

  • Backgrounder posted November 15, 2006 by Ariel Cohen, Ph.D. U.S. Interests and Central Asia Energy Security

    In the past five years, real and present dangers to U.S. national security, especially Islamist terrorism and threats to the energy supply, have affected U.S. policy in Central Asia. The region has great energy potential and is strategically important, but it is land-locked, which complicates U.S. access and involvement there.[1] The United States has varied…

  • Commentary posted March 24, 2003 by Daniel J. Mitchell, Ph.D. Russia's Flat Tax Miracle

    It's never fun to admit failure. But Russia's 13 percent flat tax forces me to confess a certain degree of incompetence. For 10 years, I've been working in Washington to replace our convoluted tax code with a simple and fair flat tax. But as every taxpayer can attest, my efforts have not borne fruit. Yet in Russia, President Vladimir Putin -- the former head of…

  • Backgrounder posted June 14, 2013 by Ariel Cohen, Ph.D. Russia’s Eurasian Union Could Endanger the Neighborhood and U.S. Interests

    In the fall of 2011, Russian President Vladimir Putin proposed forming a Eurasian Union (EAU) with Kazakhstan and Belarus. In November 2011, the presidents of these three countries signed an agreement to launch the Eurasian Union and make it fully operational by 2015. Stretching from the Polish border to the Pacific, the length of the former Soviet Union, the new Eurasian…

  • Special Report posted November 26, 2013 by James M. Roberts, Ariel Cohen, Ph.D., Jonathan Blaisdell The Eurasian Union: Undermining Economic Freedom and Prosperity in the South Caucasus

    The Southern Caucasus—Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Georgia—is in Russia’s geopolitical crosshairs. Russian President Vladimir Putin, who once called the demise of the Soviet Union “the greatest geopolitical catastrophe of the [20th] century,”[1] is seeking economic and political alliances to restore Russia’s power in what then-President Dmitry Medvedev called its traditional…

  • Backgrounder posted December 1, 2010 by Mackenzie Eaglen, Lajos F. Szaszdi, Ph.D. What Russia’s Stealth Fighter Developments Mean for America

    Abstract: Russia’s development of the PAK FA fifth-generation stealth fighter could challenge American air supremacy, especially if Russia sells the PAK FA to its usual buyers of military equipment. In the U.S., closure of the F-22 production line has severely limited America’s ability to respond to PAK FA proliferation by building more F-22s and potentially…

  • Backgrounder posted July 18, 2001 by Ariel Cohen, Ph.D. The Russia-China Friendship and Cooperation Treaty: A Strategic Shift in Eurasia?

    On July 16, the presidents of Russia and China signed a Treaty for Good Neighborliness, Friendship and Cooperation in Moscow.1 This treaty is the first such agreement between these two Eurasian powers since Mao Tse-tung signed a treaty with Joseph Stalin of the U.S.S.R. in 1950, four months before the outbreak of the Korean War. That treaty had been driven by…

  • Backgrounder posted January 9, 1980 by James Phillips The Soviet Invasion of Afghanistan

    (Archived document, may contain errors) THE SOVIET INVAS./ON OF AFGHANISTAN INTRODUCTION On December 27, 1979, under cover cf an ongoing Soviet military buildup, heavily-armed elements of a Soviet airborne brigade were airlifted into Kabul, Afghanistan, to violently overthrow the regime of President Hafizollah Amin. Within hours after the beginning of…

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  • Issue Brief posted March 28, 2014 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D., Nile Gardiner, Ph.D., Luke Coffey, Dakota Wood If Russia Attacks: How the U.S. Should Respond to Further Aggression Against Ukraine

    After Russia’s illegal invasion, occupation, and subsequent annexation of Crimea, there is a concern that Moscow will not stop until all of Ukraine is under Russia’s control. By invading Crimea, the regime of President Vladimir Putin has made it impossible any longer to consider Russia a responsible nation or suitable partner for the United States in solving regional and…

  • Issue Brief posted March 27, 2014 by Michaela Dodge U.S. Nuclear Weapons Policy: After Ukraine, Time to Reassess Strategic Posture

    Russia recently invaded Ukraine and annexed Crimea in blatant disregard of Ukraine’s territorial sovereignty. Russia’s willingness to challenge the status quo and its disregard for its arms control obligations have important implications for U.S. nuclear weapons policy. The U.S. can take many steps to improve and strengthen its overall nuclear posture regardless of…

  • Backgrounder posted March 25, 2014 by Nile Gardiner, Ph.D., Jack Spencer, Luke Coffey, Nicolas Loris Beyond the Crimea Crisis: Comprehensive Next Steps in U.S.–Russian Relations

    After three months of mass street demonstrations, the Ukrainian people succeeded in ousting their corrupt and incompetent president, the Kremlin-backed Viktor Yanukovych. On February 22, the Ukrainian parliament acted in favor of the people it represents by granting amnesty to all political prisoners, bringing back the constitution of 2004 (which reduces the powers of the…

  • Issue Brief posted March 21, 2014 by Michaela Dodge U.S. Missile Defense Policy After Russia’s Actions in Ukraine

    Russia has invaded Ukraine and annexed Crimea in blatant disregard of Ukraine’s territorial sovereignty and international law. Russia’s crude steps carry important implications for U.S. missile defense policy. Currently, the Administration’s policy is not to affect the “strategic balance” with Russia in terms of ballistic missiles.[1] In reality, there is no strategic…

  • Issue Brief posted March 12, 2014 by Luke Coffey Obama’s Meeting with Ukrainian Prime Minister Arseniy Yatsenyuk

    On March 12, the new interim Prime Minister of Ukraine, Arseniy Yatsenyuk, will meet with President Barack Obama at the White House. This will be the first such visit since the removal of Viktor Yanukovych’s government. In what is best described as a blatant disregard of Ukraine’s national sovereignty, Russian troops continue to occupy key sites across the Crimean…

  • Issue Brief posted March 4, 2014 by Steven P. Bucci, Ph.D., Nile Gardiner, Ph.D., Luke Coffey Russia, the West, and Ukraine: Time for a Strategy—Not Hope

    On February 28, Russian troops, aided by pro-Russian local militia, began violating Ukraine’s territorial integrity by occupying important sites across the Crimean Peninsula. Under the pretext of “protecting Russian people,” the deployment of Russian troops into Crimea demonstrates a blatant disregard of Ukraine’s national sovereignty. Russia’s anachronistic irredentist…

  • Issue Brief posted January 24, 2014 by Ariel Cohen, Ph.D. Ukraine’s Anti-Protest Laws: A Step Backwards in Time

    Violent clashes between police and demonstrators erupted in Kyiv, Ukraine, last weekend in the wake of new legislation effectively banning public protest. If the two sides do not take a step back from the brink, the confrontation may lead to chaos, when neither the government nor the opposition have control. The legislation, passed on January 16 by President Victor…

  • Issue Brief posted January 6, 2014 by Cassandra Lucaccioni , Ariel Cohen, Ph.D. Sochi: Security and Counterterrorism at the 2014 Winter Olympics

    Two bomb attacks, carried out by suicide bombers at a railway station and a bus in Volgograd (formerly Stalingrad), 500 miles southeast of Moscow, shattered the pre-holiday spirit as Russians prepared to celebrate the New Year. Up to 45 people, including children, were killed, and over 100 were injured, many of them severely; the death count is sure to climb. The Olympic…

  • Issue Brief posted December 13, 2013 by Ariel Cohen, Ph.D. The U.S. Should Lead on Ukraine

    U.S. policy toward Ukraine suffered a significant self-inflicted injury early Thursday morning when President Viktor Yanukovich dispatched riot-control teams to disperse peaceful demonstrators in the center of Kyiv, the ancient capital of Ukraine. So far, the White House and the State Department have been behind the curve on one of the most important geopolitical crises…

  • Issue Brief posted December 11, 2013 by Michaela Dodge, Ariel Cohen, Ph.D. Russia’s Arms Control Violations: What the U.S. Should Do

    This past June, President Obama called for another round of nuclear weapons reductions by stating that he intends to “seek negotiated cuts with Russia to move beyond Cold War nuclear postures.”[1] The United States has already moved beyond its Cold War nuclear posture. Since the end of the Cold War, the U.S. has cut the number of its deployed strategic nuclear weapons by…

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