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  • Special Report posted February 4, 2015 by Bryan Riley Trade and Prosperity in the States: The Case of Florida

    Hundreds of thousands of Floridians owe their jobs to international trade and investment. The benefits of international commerce are reflected in the voting record of the state’s congressional delegation, which overwhelmingly supported free trade agreements (FTAs) with Colombia, Panama, and South Korea in 2011. However, the state’s elected representatives have not always…

  • Commentary posted January 28, 2015 by William T. Wilson, Ph.D. Advice to Obama in India: Don't Forget the Economy

    President Obama attended India’s Republic Day Celebrations as its chief guest—the first time a U.S. head of state has been given this honor. Bilateral discussions, however, were the main order of business for this trip, cut short by the death of Saudi King Abdullah. Talks likely focused, in their limited form, on a range of important defense and foreign policy issues; the…

  • Commentary posted January 26, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Barack Obama finally offers a clear choice

    Let's be grateful to President Barack Obama. In his State of the Union address, he dropped the pretense of bipartisanship and, by siding with the progressives, gave the nation what it needs: a clear choice. That's the true American way. One of the most tiresome things about the first six years of President Obama's tenure was his fake bipartisanship. He often offered to…

  • Commentary posted January 20, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. The closing chapter of a not so special relationship?

    The White House announced Prime Minister David Cameron’s two-day visit to Washington in a statement issued last Saturday. It was a tellingly low-key announcement for an Anglo-American relationship that has mostly drifted in the past five years. The alliance, though, does have one big idea up its sleeve. Unfortunately, it’s a bad one. It’s entirely possible that this will…

  • Commentary posted December 22, 2014 by Lisa Curtis A Big, Bold Invite from Modi

    It’s hard to believe that merely seven months ago, speculation was rife that Prime Minister Narendra Modi would hold a grudge against the U.S. for revoking his tourist visa for nine years and keep American officials at arm’s length. The opposite, however, has occurred. With his invitation to President Barack Obama to be the chief guest at the 2015 Republic Day parade,…

  • Commentary posted November 18, 2014 by Brett D. Schaefer Who Needs UNIDO?

    The United States did something highly unusual 18 years ago. It withdrew from the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO). The move came after lengthy assessment concluded that UNIDO lacked a clear purpose and was generally ineffective. What made the action all the more remarkable was that it was done at the direction of Democratic President Bill…

  • Commentary posted November 18, 2014 by Olivia Enos Afghanistan Counternarcotics: A Cut and Run Strategy is No Strategy at All

    The opium business is booming in Afghanistan, despite a 12-year, $7.6 billion counternarcotics initiative by the U.S.  Last year, Afghans devoted a record 209,000 hectares of land to opium poppy cultivation, and those crops produced drug profits 50 percent higher than in 2012. Those startling numbers come from a recent report by the Office of the Special Inspector…

  • Commentary posted November 10, 2014 by Dean Cheng Xi-Obama Summit: Son of Sunnylands?

    U.S. president Barack Obama and Chinese president Xi Jinping will meet this week, in a state visit by the American president to the People’s Republic of China (PRC) on the eve of the APEC Summit. Counting side discussions at multilateral conferences, this will be the fourth meeting between the two presidents—a remarkable, and even laudable, track record of top leaders…

  • Commentary posted November 7, 2014 by Daniel Kochis Where's the Site of Russia's Next Land Grab? Hint: It's in the Arctic

    Russia is poised to make another land grab.  This time it’s an island.  But don’t get too alarmed.  The island’s in the Arctic.  No one lives there. And it may not even be an island at all. But that hasn’t kept the Moscow media from trumpeting the discovery of a new “island,” which Russia is now claiming as its own.   The small piece of land lies north of Siberia in the…

  • Commentary posted October 16, 2014 by Mike Gonzalez Texas' Forgotten Heroes

    Juan Seguín, José Antonio Navarro, Lorenzo de Zavala. Recognize any of those names? If so, you know your Texas history well. If not, you may be a victim of political correctness. That’s because these three men don’t fit into the standard historical narrative in Texas. All were war heroes, fighting for Texas’ independence from Mexico and against Mexican President…

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  • Backgrounder posted July 19, 2011 by Robert Rector, Rachel Sheffield Air Conditioning, Cable TV, and an Xbox: What is Poverty in the United States Today?

    Read the Executive Summary Abstract: For decades, the U.S. Census Bureau has reported that over 30 million Americans were living in “poverty,” but the bureau’s definition of poverty differs widely from that held by most Americans. In fact, other government surveys show that most of the persons whom the government defines as “in poverty”…

  • Lecture posted July 2, 2013 by Jim DeMint Britain and the U.S.: Two Peoples United by an Attachment to Self-Determination

    I would like to thank the Henry Jackson Society, not just for this event today, but for the very important work you do on transatlantic relations and security concerns. You stand up for freedom around the world, and I salute you for that. I would like to say one word about the man after whom you’re named. Scoop Jackson was the kind of Democrat I wish we had more of today.…

  • Backgrounder posted June 17, 2013 by Jessica Zuckerman, Bryan Riley, David Inserra Beyond the Border: U.S. and Canada Expand Partnership in Trade and Security

    In December 2011, President Barack Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper released the Beyond the Border Action Plan. The plan—part of the Beyond the Border strategy announced earlier that year—offers a cooperative strategy and joint vision intended to boost security and facilitate the flow of goods and people between the two nations. With the economies,…

  • Backgrounder posted July 26, 2010 by Sally McNamara, Ariel Cohen, Ph.D., James Phillips Countering Turkey’s Strategic Drift

    Abstract: For decades, Turkey and the United States cooperated in the Mediterranean, the Persian Gulf, Central Asia, and even Korea. However, Turkish and U.S. interests in the Balkans, Central Asia, the Caucasus, the Middle East, and the Persian Gulf have recently diverged. On its current trajectory, Turkey’s traditional strategic relationship with the West could devolve…

  • Backgrounder posted July 18, 2012 by Colonel William Jordan, Lewis M. Stern, Walter Lohman U.S.–Vietnam Defense Relations: Investing in Strategic Alignment

    Abstract: Despite the improving relationship between the U.S. and Vietnamese defense establishments, the strategic imperatives of the U.S. and Vietnam are developing in different ways at different speeds. Both countries have complex relationships with China and stakeholders who militate against strategic clarity on the most salient issue they…

  • WebMemo posted March 31, 2011 by Steven Groves Obama Wrongly Adopts U.N. “Responsibility to Protect” to Justify Libya Intervention

    On March 28, President Obama delivered a speech for the purpose of explaining his decision to use military force in Libya.[1] Although the President gave multiple justifications for the U.S. intervention, it appears more and more that his philosophical basis for ordering the use of force by the United States is based on a doctrine known as “the responsibility to protect”…

  • Special Report posted April 26, 2013 by Sunjoy Joshi, C. Raja Mohan, Vikram Sood, Rajeswari Pillai Rajagopalan, Ph.D., James Jay Carafano, Ph.D., Walter Lohman, Lisa Curtis, Derek Scissors, Ph.D. Beyond the Plateau in U.S. – India Relations

    IntroductionIn real terms, there is no denying the extraordinary progress in the engagement between India and the United States over the past two decades. Throughout, and even after, the Cold War, the world's two largest democracies remained estranged. In the first decade after the end of the Cold War, the two countries quarreled over nuclear nonproliferation; the U.S.…

  • Commentary posted December 22, 2014 by Lisa Curtis A Big, Bold Invite from Modi

    It’s hard to believe that merely seven months ago, speculation was rife that Prime Minister Narendra Modi would hold a grudge against the U.S. for revoking his tourist visa for nine years and keep American officials at arm’s length. The opposite, however, has occurred. With his invitation to President Barack Obama to be the chief guest at the 2015 Republic Day parade,…

  • Commentary posted November 25, 2013 by Rebeccah Heinrichs Missile defense — in New York

    From forest fires to earthquakes, the West Coast can seem a particularly dangerous place to live. But when it comes to protection against the threat of long-range missiles, it’s much better off than the East Coast. But that may be about to change for the better — with New York’s Sen. Chuck Schumer playing a major role. In March, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel…

  • Backgrounder posted August 20, 2012 by Lisa Curtis Going the Extra Mile for a Strategic U.S.–India Relationship

    Abstract: While the U.S. and India have developed multifaceted ties over the last decade, the overall relationship has recently been challenged: India bought advanced fighter jets from France, not from the U.S.; the Indian parliament virtually shut out U.S. companies from India’s civil nuclear industry; the Singh government delayed economic reforms that…

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