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  • Backgrounder posted September 15, 2016 by Michaela Dodge President Obama’s Missile Defense Policy: A Misguided Legacy

    As a candidate, Barack Obama called ballistic missile defense programs “unproven” and vowed to cut them.[1] As President, Barack Obama eventually had to appreciate the value that missile defense brings to the U.S. strategic posture and allied relationships. The Obama Administration initially cancelled some of the most important missile defense programs that were started…

  • Issue Brief posted September 13, 2016 by Luke Coffey Caspian Sea Ownership: Not an Issue the U.S. Should Ignore

    Since the collapse of the Soviet Union there has been a debate over the legal status of the Caspian Sea: Is it a sea, or is it a lake? And to whom does it belong? The outcome of this debate will have a major impact on the way energy resources are extracted and transported, and by whom—which could have a major impact on U.S. economic and security interests in the region.…

  • Special Report posted September 12, 2016 by Martin N Murphy, PhD Understanding Russia’s Concept for Total War in Europe

    In the night of February 26 to 27, 2014, small groups of armed men, who later acquired the labels “little green men,” and even “polite green men” (which were anything but), appeared across Crimea.[1] They corralled Ukrainian forces in their bases, making it plain that any attempt to leave would be met with violence; they took over communications masts and studios,…

  • Issue Brief posted September 1, 2016 by Joshua Meservey An Approaching Transition in Zimbabwe Requires a U.S. Game Plan

    Zimbabwe has not had a change in leadership since 1980 when now-President Robert Mugabe was elected as Prime Minister. Mugabe’s present physical frailty, however, has touched off an unprecedented succession battle within the ruling Zimbabwe African National Union-Patriotic Front (ZANU-PF) party. Widespread popular demonstrations against the government’s brutality,…

  • Issue Brief posted August 22, 2016 by Anthony B. Kim, Ambassador Terry Miller Three Promising Areas for Greater U.S.–South Korean Economic Cooperation

    The United States and South Korea have put into place a framework for fruitful economic partnerships that are delivering measurable, concrete benefits for Americans and Koreans alike. Dynamic trade and investment activities have deepened and broadened the economic relationship, and the two longtime allies have much to gain if their governments work together to reinforce…

  • Lecture posted August 12, 2016 by Lee Edwards, Ph.D., Edwin Meese III, Alan Charles Kors, George Weigel Pursuing Freedom and Democracy: Lessons from the Fall of the Berlin Wall

    Introduction The Cold War was the most protracted and unconventional conflict of the 20th century. World War I and World War II were great sweeping wars that shaped our history and our world, but they didn’t match the length or the complexity of the ideological and strategic struggle that occupied superpowers and lesser powers on every continent for more than four…

  • Backgrounder posted August 3, 2016 by Brett D. Schaefer United Nations Peacekeeping Flaws and Abuses: The U.S. Must Demand Reform

    As a permanent member of the United Nations Security Council and the largest contributor to the U.N. peacekeeping budget, the United States has extraordinary authority over the approval and parameters of those operations, and a responsibility to ensure that the missions are effective, and that peacekeepers uphold the highest standards of conduct. The unprecedented pace,…

  • Lecture posted July 7, 2016 by Franklin L. Lavin Thinking Seriously About China

    Thank you to Ed Feulner for the kind introduction, and let me also thank The Heritage Foundation for hosting me today. I have had the privilege of serving on the Advisory Council of Heritage’s Asian Studies Center for a number of years, and I am grateful for the good work it does. We are here today to discuss U.S.–China relations, and the title of my speech was selected…

  • Issue Brief posted July 7, 2016 by Luke Coffey, Daniel Kochis, Lisa Curtis Eight Essential Issues for the 2016 NATO Summit in Warsaw

    The 2016 NATO Summit will be held on July 8 and 9 in Warsaw. This is a critical time for the Alliance. In 2014, Russia invaded Ukraine, forcefully changing the borders of Europe for the first time since 1945. This invasion jarred many in Western Europe and the U.S. who had viewed Russia through rose-colored glasses even after the invasion of Georgia in 2008. Today,…

  • Issue Brief posted July 5, 2016 by Luke Coffey, Daniel Kochis NATO Summit 2016: The Alliance Must Deepen the NATO–Ukraine Partnership

    The upcoming NATO summit in Warsaw is an opportunity for the alliance to provide realistic and meaningful support to Ukraine. It has been over 28 months since Russia invaded Ukraine. Since that time, Russia has annexed Crimea, consolidated its position in the Black Sea, and created a frozen conflict in eastern Ukraine. Russia’s invasion has cost 10,000 lives and…

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  • Commentary posted May 12, 2014 by Edwin J. Feulner, Ph.D. How Reagan broke the ice at Reykjavik

    It is perhaps fitting that the Cold War finally began to crack apart in a place called Iceland. It was October 1986, and President Reagan flew to Reykjavik to meet Soviet Premier Mikhail Gorbachev. Our side didn’t expect much from the talks. They were intended to give the leaders a chance to get to know each other better and lay some groundwork for future talks, planned…

  • Commentary posted March 10, 2010 by Ariel Cohen, Ph.D. Free Khodorkovsky

    President Obama has his hands full dealing with Russia. However, high on his agenda should be the release of Mikhail Khodorkovsky, Moscow's most famous prisoner. Success there would demonstrate the administration's ability to promote freedom in Russia and around the world. It even might encourage the freeing of other political prisoners and a new wave of reforms…

  • Commentary posted October 16, 2014 by Mike Gonzalez Texas' Forgotten Heroes

    Juan Seguín, José Antonio Navarro, Lorenzo de Zavala. Recognize any of those names? If so, you know your Texas history well. If not, you may be a victim of political correctness. That’s because these three men don’t fit into the standard historical narrative in Texas. All were war heroes, fighting for Texas’ independence from Mexico and against Mexican President…

  • Commentary posted November 25, 2013 by Edwin J. Feulner, Ph.D. The spirit of America

    With the annual media coverage of “Black Friday,” it’s easy to overlook an important fact: There’s a lot of giving going on year-round that isn’t gift-wrapped — giving that makes a significant difference in the lives of millions. Take the aptly named Spirit of America (SOA), a nonprofit organization that works with U.S. military personnel to provide humanitarian…

  • Commentary posted September 21, 2011 by Kim R. Holmes, Ph.D. America’s Waning Influence in the Middle East

    President Obama thought that if he reached out to the Muslim world, American influence in the Middle East would rise. It didn’t work out that way.Witness the fight the administration is waging at the United Nations to prevent the Palestinians from gaining its nod to “statehood” and borders without Israel’s agreement.The Palestinians likely were emboldened when the…

  • Commentary posted December 22, 2014 by Lisa Curtis A Big, Bold Invite from Modi

    It’s hard to believe that merely seven months ago, speculation was rife that Prime Minister Narendra Modi would hold a grudge against the U.S. for revoking his tourist visa for nine years and keep American officials at arm’s length. The opposite, however, has occurred. With his invitation to President Barack Obama to be the chief guest at the 2015 Republic Day parade,…

  • Commentary posted July 15, 2014 by Edwin J. Feulner, Ph.D. Still the Exceptional Nation

    Americans hardly need an excuse to display the flag, but few occasions bring the red, white and blue out in fuller force than our national birthday. Jeane Kirkpatrick once said, “Americans need to face the truth about themselves, no matter how pleasant it is.” The truth is that the United States is an exceptional nation: It’s the world’s oldest and most stable capitalist…

  • Commentary posted January 13, 2014 by Ambassador Terry Miller America's Dwindling Economic Freedom

    World economic freedom has reached record levels, according to the 2014 Index of Economic Freedom, released Tuesday by the Heritage Foundation and The Wall Street Journal. But after seven straight years of decline, the U.S. has dropped out of the top 10 most economically free countries. For 20 years, the index has measured a nation's commitment to free enterprise on a…

  • Commentary posted November 18, 2014 by Olivia Enos Afghanistan Counternarcotics: A Cut and Run Strategy is No Strategy at All

    The opium business is booming in Afghanistan, despite a 12-year, $7.6 billion counternarcotics initiative by the U.S.  Last year, Afghans devoted a record 209,000 hectares of land to opium poppy cultivation, and those crops produced drug profits 50 percent higher than in 2012. Those startling numbers come from a recent report by the Office of the Special Inspector…

  • Commentary posted November 18, 2014 by Brett D. Schaefer Who Needs UNIDO?

    The United States did something highly unusual 18 years ago. It withdrew from the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO). The move came after lengthy assessment concluded that UNIDO lacked a clear purpose and was generally ineffective. What made the action all the more remarkable was that it was done at the direction of Democratic President Bill…

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