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United States Of America

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  • Lecture posted September 15, 2014 by Lisa Curtis An Opportunity to Reenergize U.S.–India Relations

    Lisa Curtis If ever there were a time to expect U.S.–India relations to improve, many would say it is now. The new Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) government, led by Prime Minister Narendra Modi, has promised to open the economy to more private investment, improve the gross domestic product (GDP) growth rate, create jobs for the rapidly growing youth population, and quicken…

  • Commentary posted August 6, 2014 by Stephen Moore Don't Cry for Argentina—Cry for Us

    Thursday’s headline in the Los Angeles Times — “Argentina Defaults on International Debt” — spooked me, as it did investors. The stock market tanked on the news. All Americans should feel the same apprehension. Argentina has about $200 billion in debt including billions in restructured bonds that it still can’t make payments on. Now Argentina has to go hat in hand to…

  • Commentary posted July 15, 2014 by Edwin J. Feulner, Ph.D. Still the Exceptional Nation

    Americans hardly need an excuse to display the flag, but few occasions bring the red, white and blue out in fuller force than our national birthday. Jeane Kirkpatrick once said, “Americans need to face the truth about themselves, no matter how pleasant it is.” The truth is that the United States is an exceptional nation: It’s the world’s oldest and most stable capitalist…

  • Lecture posted May 15, 2014 by Michaela Dodge The U.S. Missile Defense Program: An Opportunity for Canadian International Leadership

    Thank you for the opportunity to testify on the vitally important subject of the importance of ballistic missile defense in the current security environment and on the benefits of ballistic missile defense cooperation between Canada and the United States. I would like to concentrate on the key issues that, in my judgment, the Canadian government should consider with…

  • Commentary posted May 12, 2014 by Edwin J. Feulner, Ph.D. How Reagan broke the ice at Reykjavik

    It is perhaps fitting that the Cold War finally began to crack apart in a place called Iceland. It was October 1986, and President Reagan flew to Reykjavik to meet Soviet Premier Mikhail Gorbachev. Our side didn’t expect much from the talks. They were intended to give the leaders a chance to get to know each other better and lay some groundwork for future talks, planned…

  • Commentary posted January 13, 2014 by Edwin J. Feulner, Ph.D. Why is America losing its economic freedom?

    For generations, people worldwide who yearn for freedom have looked to the United States. Here, every citizen can speak his mind, pursue his passion and exercise other God-given liberties that are unjustly denied many others around the globe. That doesn’t mean we’re above reproach in all areas of freedom, though. Take economic freedom, which continues to deteriorate a…

  • Commentary posted January 13, 2014 by Ambassador Terry Miller America's Dwindling Economic Freedom

    World economic freedom has reached record levels, according to the 2014 Index of Economic Freedom, released Tuesday by the Heritage Foundation and The Wall Street Journal. But after seven straight years of decline, the U.S. has dropped out of the top 10 most economically free countries. For 20 years, the index has measured a nation's commitment to free enterprise on a…

  • Commentary posted December 23, 2013 by Peter Brookes U.S., Russia relations throw off sparks

    Early in the Obama administration, then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton gave Russian foreign minister Sergei Lavrov a mock-up of a large red button inscribed with the Russian word “reset.” Or so she thought. The button, meant to signify the start of a new relationship, actually was labeled with the Russian word for “overcharged,” according to Lavrov. Clinton, in her…

  • Commentary posted December 21, 2013 by Lisa Curtis Time to arrest downward spiral: US must say sorry and India cut rhetoric

    US Secretary of State John Kerry's expression of regret over the US arrest of Indian diplomat Devyani Khobragade is not enough to get relations back on an even keel. For the sake of the partnership, which Secretary Kerry himself has referred to as one of the most important for the US in the twenty-first century, the US must apologize for the manner in which Khobragade…

  • Commentary posted November 25, 2013 by Edwin J. Feulner, Ph.D. The spirit of America

    With the annual media coverage of “Black Friday,” it’s easy to overlook an important fact: There’s a lot of giving going on year-round that isn’t gift-wrapped — giving that makes a significant difference in the lives of millions. Take the aptly named Spirit of America (SOA), a nonprofit organization that works with U.S. military personnel to provide humanitarian…

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  • Lecture posted September 15, 2014 by Lisa Curtis An Opportunity to Reenergize U.S.–India Relations

    Lisa Curtis If ever there were a time to expect U.S.–India relations to improve, many would say it is now. The new Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) government, led by Prime Minister Narendra Modi, has promised to open the economy to more private investment, improve the gross domestic product (GDP) growth rate, create jobs for the rapidly growing youth population, and quicken…

  • Executive Summary posted July 19, 2011 by Robert Rector, Rachel Sheffield Executive Summary: Air Conditioning, Cable TV, and an Xbox: What Is Poverty in the United States Today?

    Read the full text here Each year for the past two decades, the U.S. Census Bureau has reported that over 30 million Americans were living in “poverty.” In recent years, the Census has reported that one in seven Americans are poor. But what does it mean to be “poor” in America? To the average American, the word “poverty” implies significant material…

  • Backgrounder posted July 19, 2011 by Robert Rector, Rachel Sheffield Air Conditioning, Cable TV, and an Xbox: What is Poverty in the United States Today?

    Read the Executive Summary Abstract: For decades, the U.S. Census Bureau has reported that over 30 million Americans were living in “poverty,” but the bureau’s definition of poverty differs widely from that held by most Americans. In fact, other government surveys show that most of the persons whom the government defines as “in poverty”…

  • Backgrounder posted March 8, 2011 by Sally McNamara The EU–U.S. Counterterrorism Relationship: An Agenda for Cooperation

    Abstract: After 9/11, the nations of Europe displayed extraordinary solidarity with the United States, and a decade later both sides of the Atlantic still know they need each other to fight the global threat of Islamist terror. But the EU–U.S. counterterrorism relationship has been marked as much by confrontation as it has by cooperation. As a result of the Lisbon Treaty,…

  • Special Report posted April 26, 2013 by Sunjoy Joshi, C. Raja Mohan, Vikram Sood, Rajeswari Pillai Rajagopalan, Ph.D., James Jay Carafano, Ph.D., Walter Lohman, Lisa Curtis, Derek Scissors, Ph.D. Beyond the Plateau in U.S. – India Relations

    IntroductionIn real terms, there is no denying the extraordinary progress in the engagement between India and the United States over the past two decades. Throughout, and even after, the Cold War, the world's two largest democracies remained estranged. In the first decade after the end of the Cold War, the two countries quarreled over nuclear nonproliferation; the U.S.…

  • Backgrounder posted June 17, 2013 by Jessica Zuckerman, Bryan Riley, David Inserra Beyond the Border: U.S. and Canada Expand Partnership in Trade and Security

    In December 2011, President Barack Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper released the Beyond the Border Action Plan. The plan—part of the Beyond the Border strategy announced earlier that year—offers a cooperative strategy and joint vision intended to boost security and facilitate the flow of goods and people between the two nations. With the economies,…

  • Commentary posted March 16, 2012 by Lisa Curtis U.S. Mission in Afghanistan Can Still Succeed

    The U.S. has experienced undeniable setbacks in Afghanistan over the last three weeks. While it is tempting to view these troubles as reason to cut and run, such a course would be irresponsible and lead to greater dangers for both the U.S. and Afghans. The U.S. mission in Afghanistan—preventing it from reverting to a safe haven for international terrorists—is still…

  • Backgrounder posted November 8, 2010 by Mark Milke School Choice in Canada: Lessons for America

    Abstract: In Canada, the province of Alberta has long encouraged school choice. Historically, Alberta has had two school systems between which parents may choose: the “public” system and a “separate” system. Other Alberta choices include charter, private, and French-language schools. Homeschooling is encouraged and supported by the provincial government, and “blended”…

  • WebMemo posted September 29, 2011 by Dean Cheng Five Myths About China’s Space Program

    As the Chinese orbit their Tiangong-1 space lab, the spotlight is once again turned on China’s space program. To help inform the discussions, it would be helpful to address a few of the myths surrounding China’s space efforts. Myth #1: China is in a space race with the United States. Perhaps the most common myth is that China is interested in…

  • Issue Brief posted June 12, 2012 by Lisa Curtis U.S.–India Strategic Dialogue Talks an Opportunity to Get Partnership Back on Track

    U.S. and Indian leaders will hold their third round of Strategic Dialogue talks in Washington, D.C., this week amidst growing concern that the U.S.–India relationship is failing to live up to what U.S. policymakers expected from it seven years ago, when the civil nuclear deal was first unveiled. A number of differences between the U.S. and India have arisen over the…

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