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  • Issue Brief posted December 1, 2016 by Bruce Klingner South Korean Political Crisis Poses Challenge for Trump Administration

    South Korea is embroiled in a fast-moving political scandal that will lead to the removal of President Park Geun-hye and could well endanger critical national security policies and strain the alliance relationship with the United States. President Park’s political life hangs by a thread, and it is only a matter of time before she either resigns or is impeached. The…

  • Backgrounder posted November 30, 2016 by Dean Cheng A U.S. Army Role in Countering China’s A2/AD Efforts: The Expeditionary Coastal Artillery Brigade

    It is a truism that the Asia–Pacific theater is an air and maritime theater. One need only look at a map to see the vast expanse of ocean that marks the region. The Pacific covers one-third of the Earth’s surface. But while air and naval forces undoubtedly play central roles in any regional defense calculations, ground forces are also essential. Air and naval forces need…

  • Issue Brief posted November 30, 2016 by Michaela Dodge The Trump Administration’s Nuclear Weapons Policy: First Steps

    Nuclear weapons continue to be essential for U.S. national security and will continue to play an irreplaceable role in deterring a large-scale attack against the U.S. homeland. Nuclear weapons in the hands of U.S. adversaries and potential adversaries are the only weapons that pose an existential threat to the nation. The Trump Administration will have a unique…

  • Issue Brief posted November 10, 2016 by Luke Coffey Trump Should Make NATO Great Again

    When President-elect Donald Trump enters office in January 2017 he will inherit a transatlantic security environment with major challenges. Russia has used military force to change borders in Europe—something that has not happened since World War II. Since 2008, it has invaded two of its neighbors and it occupies thousands of square miles of territory in Ukraine and…

  • Issue Brief posted November 9, 2016 by Luke Coffey, Daniel Kochis Greece: Vital Messages Needed on Obama’s Final Trip to Europe

    The White House has announced a short-notice trip to Europe for November 15 to 18. President Barack Obama will start the trip in Greece, where he will meet with President Prokopios Pavlopoulo and Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras before traveling on to Germany. Greece, a NATO member since 1952, hosts an important U.S. naval base at Souda Bay on the island of Crete. In the…

  • Issue Brief posted November 9, 2016 by Daniel Kochis, Robin Simcox President Obama Should Push for Greater Transatlantic Security During Berlin Visit

    President Obama will travel to Europe from November 15–18, starting in Greece before traveling to Germany. In his sixth visit to Germany, Obama will meet with Chancellor Angela Merkel, as well as the leaders of France, Italy, and the United Kingdom. Germany is an important security partner of the United States and the largest economy in Europe. Because decisions made by…

  • Issue Brief posted October 24, 2016 by Ana Quintana The Colombian–FARC Peace Deal: Why It Failed, and How the U.S. Can Support a Responsible Renegotiation

    On October 2, Colombians rejected a peace deal in a popular referendum negotiated by their government and the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), a Marxist guerilla group. Intended to bring an end to Colombia’s 52-year war, the pact lost by a razor-thin margin, 50.21 percent to 49.78 percent.[1] While public opinion polls had indicated support for the peace…

  • Backgrounder posted September 15, 2016 by Michaela Dodge President Obama’s Missile Defense Policy: A Misguided Legacy

    As a candidate, Barack Obama called ballistic missile defense programs “unproven” and vowed to cut them.[1] As President, Barack Obama eventually had to appreciate the value that missile defense brings to the U.S. strategic posture and allied relationships. The Obama Administration initially cancelled some of the most important missile defense programs that were started…

  • Issue Brief posted September 13, 2016 by Luke Coffey Caspian Sea Ownership: Not an Issue the U.S. Should Ignore

    Since the collapse of the Soviet Union there has been a debate over the legal status of the Caspian Sea: Is it a sea, or is it a lake? And to whom does it belong? The outcome of this debate will have a major impact on the way energy resources are extracted and transported, and by whom—which could have a major impact on U.S. economic and security interests in the region.…

  • Special Report posted September 12, 2016 by Martin N Murphy, PhD Understanding Russia’s Concept for Total War in Europe

    In the night of February 26 to 27, 2014, small groups of armed men, who later acquired the labels “little green men,” and even “polite green men” (which were anything but), appeared across Crimea.[1] They corralled Ukrainian forces in their bases, making it plain that any attempt to leave would be met with violence; they took over communications masts and studios,…

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  • Commentary posted May 12, 2014 by Edwin J. Feulner, Ph.D. How Reagan broke the ice at Reykjavik

    It is perhaps fitting that the Cold War finally began to crack apart in a place called Iceland. It was October 1986, and President Reagan flew to Reykjavik to meet Soviet Premier Mikhail Gorbachev. Our side didn’t expect much from the talks. They were intended to give the leaders a chance to get to know each other better and lay some groundwork for future talks, planned…

  • Commentary posted March 10, 2010 by Ariel Cohen, Ph.D. Free Khodorkovsky

    President Obama has his hands full dealing with Russia. However, high on his agenda should be the release of Mikhail Khodorkovsky, Moscow's most famous prisoner. Success there would demonstrate the administration's ability to promote freedom in Russia and around the world. It even might encourage the freeing of other political prisoners and a new wave of reforms…

  • Commentary posted October 16, 2014 by Mike Gonzalez Texas' Forgotten Heroes

    Juan Seguín, José Antonio Navarro, Lorenzo de Zavala. Recognize any of those names? If so, you know your Texas history well. If not, you may be a victim of political correctness. That’s because these three men don’t fit into the standard historical narrative in Texas. All were war heroes, fighting for Texas’ independence from Mexico and against Mexican President…

  • Commentary posted November 25, 2013 by Edwin J. Feulner, Ph.D. The spirit of America

    With the annual media coverage of “Black Friday,” it’s easy to overlook an important fact: There’s a lot of giving going on year-round that isn’t gift-wrapped — giving that makes a significant difference in the lives of millions. Take the aptly named Spirit of America (SOA), a nonprofit organization that works with U.S. military personnel to provide humanitarian…

  • Commentary posted September 21, 2011 by Kim R. Holmes, Ph.D. America’s Waning Influence in the Middle East

    President Obama thought that if he reached out to the Muslim world, American influence in the Middle East would rise. It didn’t work out that way.Witness the fight the administration is waging at the United Nations to prevent the Palestinians from gaining its nod to “statehood” and borders without Israel’s agreement.The Palestinians likely were emboldened when the…

  • Commentary posted December 22, 2014 by Lisa Curtis A Big, Bold Invite from Modi

    It’s hard to believe that merely seven months ago, speculation was rife that Prime Minister Narendra Modi would hold a grudge against the U.S. for revoking his tourist visa for nine years and keep American officials at arm’s length. The opposite, however, has occurred. With his invitation to President Barack Obama to be the chief guest at the 2015 Republic Day parade,…

  • Commentary posted July 15, 2014 by Edwin J. Feulner, Ph.D. Still the Exceptional Nation

    Americans hardly need an excuse to display the flag, but few occasions bring the red, white and blue out in fuller force than our national birthday. Jeane Kirkpatrick once said, “Americans need to face the truth about themselves, no matter how pleasant it is.” The truth is that the United States is an exceptional nation: It’s the world’s oldest and most stable capitalist…

  • Commentary posted January 13, 2014 by Ambassador Terry Miller America's Dwindling Economic Freedom

    World economic freedom has reached record levels, according to the 2014 Index of Economic Freedom, released Tuesday by the Heritage Foundation and The Wall Street Journal. But after seven straight years of decline, the U.S. has dropped out of the top 10 most economically free countries. For 20 years, the index has measured a nation's commitment to free enterprise on a…

  • Commentary posted November 18, 2014 by Olivia Enos Afghanistan Counternarcotics: A Cut and Run Strategy is No Strategy at All

    The opium business is booming in Afghanistan, despite a 12-year, $7.6 billion counternarcotics initiative by the U.S.  Last year, Afghans devoted a record 209,000 hectares of land to opium poppy cultivation, and those crops produced drug profits 50 percent higher than in 2012. Those startling numbers come from a recent report by the Office of the Special Inspector…

  • Commentary posted November 18, 2014 by Brett D. Schaefer Who Needs UNIDO?

    The United States did something highly unusual 18 years ago. It withdrew from the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO). The move came after lengthy assessment concluded that UNIDO lacked a clear purpose and was generally ineffective. What made the action all the more remarkable was that it was done at the direction of Democratic President Bill…

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