• Heritage Action
  • Heritage Libertad
  • More

Nicaragua

Our Research & Offerings on Nicaragua
  • Issue Brief posted August 30, 2013 by Jessica Zuckerman Nicaragua’s Canal Push and Concerns for the U.S.

    President Daniel Ortega of Nicaragua is pushing for a proposed canal project despite lingering questions and growing skepticism from Nicaraguan citizens and politicians. With no public debate, a deficit of hard facts, and a proposal rushed through the Nicaraguan National Assembly, the canal would be a massive undertaking with many unforeseen consequences and still…

  • Issue Brief posted July 12, 2012 by Ambassador Robert J Callahan, Ray Walser, Ph.D. No New Property Waiver for Nicaragua’s Daniel Ortega

    If the Obama Administration is serious about promoting democracy in Nicaragua, it can emphatically do so later this month when it decides whether to grant a property waiver to President Daniel Ortega’s corrupt and authoritarian government. If it opts to withhold the waiver, it will compel the U.S. to oppose Nicaragua’s loan applications at the Inter-American…

  • WebMemo posted January 6, 2012 by Ray Walser, Ph.D., James Phillips Iran Moves West: Ahmadinejad's 2012 Latin American Visit

    On January 8, Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad lands in Venezuela to start a brief but highly symbolic Latin American visit. The Iranian leader aims to bolster ties with Venezuela’s Hugo Chavez and some of the region’s most strident anti-American leaders. For the Obama Administration, the Iranian visit reflects a continuing erosion of U.S. influence in the region and…

  • WebMemo posted October 13, 2011 by Ambassador Robert J Callahan, Ray Walser, Ph.D. Nicaragua’s Presidential Elections: How Daniel Ortega Could Shame Democracy

    It is a safe bet that Daniel Ortega will be Nicaragua’s next president on November 6. As leader of the disciplined Sandinista party, the 65-year-old former Marxist-Leninist rebel faces a fragmented and poorly funded opposition. He has a robust campaign chest thanks to nearly $2 billion dispensed over the past four years by his Venezuelan soul mate, Hugo Chavez. He…

  • WebMemo posted January 26, 2010 by Ray Walser, Ph.D. Battling Chavez’s Radical Vision for an Anti-U.S. Honduras

    On January 27, Porfirio “Pepe” Lobo will don the sash of presidential office in Honduras. He becomes the eighth civilian president since military rule ended in 1982. Lobo and a new congress dominated by his National Party take power in one of the Western Hemisphere’s poorest countries—a nation badly scarred by a seven-month upheaval that culminated with the removal of…

  • Backgrounder posted January 20, 2010 by Ray Walser, Ph.D. State Sponsors of Terrorism: Time to Add Venezuela to the List

    Abstract: The U.S. officially designates four countries as state sponsors of terrorism--Iran, Syria, Cuba, and Sudan. It is high time to add Venezuela to the list. Far from being merely a populist showman and bully, Hugo Chávez is a reckless leader who collaborates with Colombian narcoterrorists and Islamist terrorists, pals around with brutal Iranian dictator Mahmoud …

  • WebMemo posted October 22, 2009 by James M. Roberts The U.S.-Panama Free Trade Agreement: A Good Deal for America

    For the past nine months, the Obama Administration and Congress have allowed three free trade agreements (FTAs) negotiated by the Bush Administration -- Colombia, Panama, and South Korea -- to languish unapproved. This delay hurts American workers, as each of the agreements offers its own unique benefit to the U.S. economy. All three FTAs will spur economic…

  • WebMemo posted July 27, 2009 by Ray Walser, Ph.D. Honduras's Conservative Awakening

    Since June 28--when the Honduran military placed Manuel Zelaya on an aircraft bound for San Jose, Costa Rica--massive media coverage, diplomatic maneuvering, and political theater have accompanied efforts to restore Zelaya to the presidency of his Central American nation. In the aftermath of his exile, Manuel Zelaya's shift from the political center toward both…

  • Backgrounder posted February 19, 2009 by Ray Walser, Ph.D. What to Do about Hugo Chávez: Venezuela's Challenge to Security in the Americas

    As the Obama Administration settles into the White House and reviews its foreign policy agenda, one significant topic likely to emerge early will be U.S. relations with Venezuela and its radical, anti-American president Hugo Chávez. The orderly transition from a Republican to a Democratic Administration in the U.S. in January 2009 contrasts with the polarizing…

  • Backgrounder posted February 5, 2009 by Ray Walser, Ph.D. Latin America and the U.S.: Building a Partnership for the Western Hemisphere

    In the face of multiple challenges from distant Iran, Iraq, North Korea, Afghanistan, and Pakistan, it may be easy to forget that Latin America and the Caribbean are so close at hand. The region may not be America's backyard, but it is certainly very much our neighborhood. The United States shares a 2,000-mile border with Mexico that is still far too porous. Cuba…

Find more work on Nicaragua
  • WebMemo posted January 8, 2009 by James M. Roberts, Ray Walser, Ph.D. 10 Points for President-Elect Obama's Latin America Strategy

    Latin America and the Caribbean may not sit high on President-elect Barack Obama's foreign policy agenda, but geography, trade, investment, migration, and transnational threats draw Western Hemisphere issues inexorably closer to the top of the list. The new Administration will quickly discover opportunities and risks in the region. As a host of appointees and…

  • Backgrounder posted February 5, 2009 by Ray Walser, Ph.D. Latin America and the U.S.: Building a Partnership for the Western Hemisphere

    In the face of multiple challenges from distant Iran, Iraq, North Korea, Afghanistan, and Pakistan, it may be easy to forget that Latin America and the Caribbean are so close at hand. The region may not be America's backyard, but it is certainly very much our neighborhood. The United States shares a 2,000-mile border with Mexico that is still far too porous. Cuba…

  • Lecture posted February 1, 1985 by Humberto Belli, Adolfo Calero, Haroldo Montelegre Three Nicaraguans on the Betrayal of Their Revolution

    This lecture is available currently only in PDF format.…

  • Commentary posted January 15, 2008 by James M. Roberts Nicaragua: Daniel Ortega's First Year

    Marketing himself as a completely redesigned 2007 model, with sleek new lines and reassuring sound bites, Sandinista leader Daniel Ortega persuaded 38 percent of Nicaraguan voters to elect him president in November 2006 on his third try since leaving office in 1990. Ortega, now 62, assumed the presidency for the second time in January 2007. As he approaches the first…

  • Commentary posted January 18, 2005 by Stephen Johnson Nicaragua's Crisis

    When Nicaraguan citizens defeated communist comandantes at the ballot box in February 1990, it was the dawn of democracy in a country that had rarely known it and the triumph of elected civilian rule in a region long plagued by dictators. Yet now, just as Nicaragua is set to receive a Millennium Challenge Account grant rewarding anti-corruption efforts, greedy…

  • Issue Brief posted August 30, 2013 by Jessica Zuckerman Nicaragua’s Canal Push and Concerns for the U.S.

    President Daniel Ortega of Nicaragua is pushing for a proposed canal project despite lingering questions and growing skepticism from Nicaraguan citizens and politicians. With no public debate, a deficit of hard facts, and a proposal rushed through the Nicaraguan National Assembly, the canal would be a massive undertaking with many unforeseen consequences and still…

  • WebMemo posted November 28, 2007 by James M. Roberts Nicaragua: Is Daniel Ortega a "Vegetarian" or a Carnivore?

    Marketing himself as a pro-democracy, "vegetarian" leftist, complete with reassuring sound bites, Sandinista leader Daniel Ortega finally recaptured the presidency in November 2006 with a mere 38 percent of Nicaraguan votes. It was his third re-election attempt since leaving that office in 1990. Ortega, now 62, assumed the presidency for the second time in January…

  • Issue Brief posted July 12, 2012 by Ambassador Robert J Callahan, Ray Walser, Ph.D. No New Property Waiver for Nicaragua’s Daniel Ortega

    If the Obama Administration is serious about promoting democracy in Nicaragua, it can emphatically do so later this month when it decides whether to grant a property waiver to President Daniel Ortega’s corrupt and authoritarian government. If it opts to withhold the waiver, it will compel the U.S. to oppose Nicaragua’s loan applications at the Inter-American…

  • WebMemo posted January 26, 2010 by Ray Walser, Ph.D. Battling Chavez’s Radical Vision for an Anti-U.S. Honduras

    On January 27, Porfirio “Pepe” Lobo will don the sash of presidential office in Honduras. He becomes the eighth civilian president since military rule ended in 1982. Lobo and a new congress dominated by his National Party take power in one of the Western Hemisphere’s poorest countries—a nation badly scarred by a seven-month upheaval that culminated with the removal of…

  • Backgrounder posted January 11, 2008 by James M. Roberts Nicaragua's President Ortega: The Balancing Act After One Year

    Marketing himself as a completely redesigned 2007 model, with sleek new lines and reassuring sound bites, Sandinista leader Daniel Ortega persuaded 38 percent of Nicaraguan voters to elect him president in November 2006 on his third try since leaving office in 1990. Ortega, now 62, assumed the presidency for the second time in January 2007. As he approaches the first…

Find more work on Nicaragua
  • Issue Brief posted August 30, 2013 by Jessica Zuckerman Nicaragua’s Canal Push and Concerns for the U.S.

    President Daniel Ortega of Nicaragua is pushing for a proposed canal project despite lingering questions and growing skepticism from Nicaraguan citizens and politicians. With no public debate, a deficit of hard facts, and a proposal rushed through the Nicaraguan National Assembly, the canal would be a massive undertaking with many unforeseen consequences and still…

  • Issue Brief posted July 12, 2012 by Ambassador Robert J Callahan, Ray Walser, Ph.D. No New Property Waiver for Nicaragua’s Daniel Ortega

    If the Obama Administration is serious about promoting democracy in Nicaragua, it can emphatically do so later this month when it decides whether to grant a property waiver to President Daniel Ortega’s corrupt and authoritarian government. If it opts to withhold the waiver, it will compel the U.S. to oppose Nicaragua’s loan applications at the Inter-American…

  • WebMemo posted January 6, 2012 by Ray Walser, Ph.D., James Phillips Iran Moves West: Ahmadinejad's 2012 Latin American Visit

    On January 8, Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad lands in Venezuela to start a brief but highly symbolic Latin American visit. The Iranian leader aims to bolster ties with Venezuela’s Hugo Chavez and some of the region’s most strident anti-American leaders. For the Obama Administration, the Iranian visit reflects a continuing erosion of U.S. influence in the region and…

  • WebMemo posted October 13, 2011 by Ambassador Robert J Callahan, Ray Walser, Ph.D. Nicaragua’s Presidential Elections: How Daniel Ortega Could Shame Democracy

    It is a safe bet that Daniel Ortega will be Nicaragua’s next president on November 6. As leader of the disciplined Sandinista party, the 65-year-old former Marxist-Leninist rebel faces a fragmented and poorly funded opposition. He has a robust campaign chest thanks to nearly $2 billion dispensed over the past four years by his Venezuelan soul mate, Hugo Chavez. He…

  • WebMemo posted January 26, 2010 by Ray Walser, Ph.D. Battling Chavez’s Radical Vision for an Anti-U.S. Honduras

    On January 27, Porfirio “Pepe” Lobo will don the sash of presidential office in Honduras. He becomes the eighth civilian president since military rule ended in 1982. Lobo and a new congress dominated by his National Party take power in one of the Western Hemisphere’s poorest countries—a nation badly scarred by a seven-month upheaval that culminated with the removal of…

  • Backgrounder posted January 20, 2010 by Ray Walser, Ph.D. State Sponsors of Terrorism: Time to Add Venezuela to the List

    Abstract: The U.S. officially designates four countries as state sponsors of terrorism--Iran, Syria, Cuba, and Sudan. It is high time to add Venezuela to the list. Far from being merely a populist showman and bully, Hugo Chávez is a reckless leader who collaborates with Colombian narcoterrorists and Islamist terrorists, pals around with brutal Iranian dictator Mahmoud …

  • WebMemo posted October 22, 2009 by James M. Roberts The U.S.-Panama Free Trade Agreement: A Good Deal for America

    For the past nine months, the Obama Administration and Congress have allowed three free trade agreements (FTAs) negotiated by the Bush Administration -- Colombia, Panama, and South Korea -- to languish unapproved. This delay hurts American workers, as each of the agreements offers its own unique benefit to the U.S. economy. All three FTAs will spur economic…

  • WebMemo posted July 27, 2009 by Ray Walser, Ph.D. Honduras's Conservative Awakening

    Since June 28--when the Honduran military placed Manuel Zelaya on an aircraft bound for San Jose, Costa Rica--massive media coverage, diplomatic maneuvering, and political theater have accompanied efforts to restore Zelaya to the presidency of his Central American nation. In the aftermath of his exile, Manuel Zelaya's shift from the political center toward both…

  • Backgrounder posted February 19, 2009 by Ray Walser, Ph.D. What to Do about Hugo Chávez: Venezuela's Challenge to Security in the Americas

    As the Obama Administration settles into the White House and reviews its foreign policy agenda, one significant topic likely to emerge early will be U.S. relations with Venezuela and its radical, anti-American president Hugo Chávez. The orderly transition from a Republican to a Democratic Administration in the U.S. in January 2009 contrasts with the polarizing…

  • Backgrounder posted February 5, 2009 by Ray Walser, Ph.D. Latin America and the U.S.: Building a Partnership for the Western Hemisphere

    In the face of multiple challenges from distant Iran, Iraq, North Korea, Afghanistan, and Pakistan, it may be easy to forget that Latin America and the Caribbean are so close at hand. The region may not be America's backyard, but it is certainly very much our neighborhood. The United States shares a 2,000-mile border with Mexico that is still far too porous. Cuba…

Find more work on Nicaragua
Find more work on Nicaragua