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Syria

Our Research & Offerings on Syria
  • Commentary posted February 6, 2014 by Peter Brookes Syria a failure for U.S.

    In a now widely reported private meeting with U.S. lawmakers at a Munich security conference last weekend, Secretary of State John Kerry told them the administration’s policies toward the bloody Syrian civil war weren’t cutting it. That’s a striking admission on the part of our chief diplomat. I agree with Kerry that things are going horribly for our interests in Syria,…

  • Issue Brief posted November 5, 2013 by James Phillips Greater Iraqi–American Cooperation Needed on Counterterrorism, Syria, and Iran

    Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki came to Washington last week in search of greater U.S. security assistance in battling the al-Qaeda-led insurgency that increasingly threatens Iraq's internal security as well as regional stability in the oil-rich Persian Gulf. The United States shares Maliki's goal of defeating al-Qaeda's franchise in Iraq, which has expanded into…

  • Commentary posted October 25, 2013 by Peter Brookes Prez clueless over Mideast mayhem

    This week the president plugged the toll-free number for Obamacare, urging citizens to join by calling in rather than logging in if they want a health care policy. My question: Which toll-free number do we call if we’re looking for a foreign policy? The fact is that while we’ve been understandably distracted by domestic policy debates, Team Obama’s foreign policy…

  • Commentary posted September 29, 2013 by Edwin J. Feulner, Ph.D. How to Handle Monsters

    It goes without saying that Syrian President Bashar al-Assad is a monster. He’s killed thousands of his own citizens, unleashed chemical weapons against rebels, and is closely associated with Iran’s dangerous rulers. But it also needs to be said, as President John Quincy Adams did, that the United States “goes not abroad in search of monsters to destroy.” Adams was…

  • Commentary posted September 23, 2013 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. Obama in the weed-choked Middle Eastern garden of Eden

    A world leader and brilliant diplomat. That’s how Anthony Eden saw himself. In 1956, during his second year as Britain's Prime Minister, he gave the green light to an audacious plan to topple the Egyptian government. Joining with the French, he would seize control of the Suez Canal, showing the world that Britain remained a preeminent power in the Middle East.…

  • Issue Brief posted September 19, 2013 by Baker Spring, Brett D. Schaefer Framework for Removing Syrian Chemical Weapons: Reasons for Skepticism

    The framework agreement for destroying Syria’s chemical weapons (CW) arsenal and its supporting infrastructure[1] is imprecise, unrealistic, and unlikely to be fulfilled. On the basis of the requirements of the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC), which Syria has now agreed to join, and historical experience in executing the CWC, even under ideal circumstances and assuming…

  • Video Recorded on September 19, 2013 Obama, Kerry, and Syria: Brookes on 'Kudlow'

    Senior Fellow Peter Brookes discusses the tactics of President Obama and Sec. of State John Kerry in resolving the Syrian conflict on CNBC's 'The Kudlow Report'.…

  • Play Movie The President's Failed Syrian Strategy: Carafano on 'Fox & Friends' Video Recorded on September 14, 2013 The President's Failed Syrian Strategy: Carafano on 'Fox & Friends'

    Vice President Jim Carafano discusses President Obama's Syrian strategy on Fox News' 'Fox and Friends'.…

  • Play Movie Syrian Chemical Weapons: Heinrichs on CNN Video Recorded on September 12, 2013 Syrian Chemical Weapons: Heinrichs on CNN

    Fellow Rebeccah Heinrichs discusses the latest on Syrian chemical weapons on CNN's 'The Lead with Jake Tapper.'…

  • Issue Brief posted September 11, 2013 by Brett D. Schaefer, Steven Groves Syria Policy Should Be Driven by U.S. Interests, Not the U.N.

    There are good reasons why Americans, under the current circumstances, should question a military intervention in Syria.[1] But President Obama has muddied the waters further by giving as much weight to international law as he did to U.S. interests in presenting his case for military intervention, frequently expressing the need to enforce an “international norm”…

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  • Commentary posted July 15, 2012 by Ariel Cohen, Ph.D. Is Russia Finally Inching Away From Syria's Assad?

    The Interfax news agency reported Tuesday that a Russian naval squadron, including an antisubmarine ship and three marine-landing craft, left Severomorsk in the Arctic for the Mediterranean. Several more ships will join it en route. Together, they will pay a call to Tartus, Syria, Russia's only naval facility outside of the old Soviet Union. Russian officials have…

  • Issue Brief posted February 24, 2012 by James Phillips, James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. Syrian WMD: Counter-proliferation Contingency Planning Needed

    Syria’s embattled regime is likely to hold out for many more months but eventually could implode with many dangerous consequences for the surrounding region. One of the risks is that chemical weapons—and possibly radioactive materials from its nuclear program—could fall into the hands of terrorists. The U.S. needs a strategy for the worst-case scenario. Washington must…

  • Issue Brief posted November 5, 2013 by James Phillips Greater Iraqi–American Cooperation Needed on Counterterrorism, Syria, and Iran

    Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki came to Washington last week in search of greater U.S. security assistance in battling the al-Qaeda-led insurgency that increasingly threatens Iraq's internal security as well as regional stability in the oil-rich Persian Gulf. The United States shares Maliki's goal of defeating al-Qaeda's franchise in Iraq, which has expanded into…

  • Commentary posted April 27, 2011 by Peter Brookes Get serious on Syria, Bam

    The bloody crackdown in Syria is just the lat est sign that Team Obama's "engagement policy" toward the Middle East bad boy hasn't paid off. As President Obama himself might say: It's time for a change. Sure, there was a chance Washington's softly-softly approach could've persuaded Damascus to relax its embrace of Tehran (which has expanded its influence…

  • Commentary posted April 21, 2003 by Peter Brookes Syria's Fate

  • Commentary posted September 4, 2013 by Kim R. Holmes, Ph.D. Sorry history of the war powers debate

    President Obama’s about-face on seeking congressional authorization to strike Syria was ultimately a political decision. On the one hand, he claims it is not legally necessary, and yet he knows he’s politically vulnerable. Thus he punted to Congress, demanding authorization to bolster support. But where does this leave us legally? Does the War Powers Act require…

  • Lecture posted January 22, 2009 by Charlotte M. Ponticelli Can the ILO Be Saved from Itself?

    For the better part of the past two years, I have had the great privilege of heading the Department of Labor's Bureau of International Affairs. Simply put, it's the agency that carries out the international responsibilities of the Department of Labor. One of my major responsibilities has been representing the Department of Labor--and, indeed, the United States…

  • WebMemo posted March 18, 2009 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Why the United States Should Not Join the Inter-Parliamentary Union

    The Inter-Parliamentary Union (IPU), founded in 1888 by Frédéric Passy of France and William Randal Cremer of Great Britain, originally sought to promote peace by encouraging regular contacts between parliamentarians from established democracies. The IPU also supported free trade and arbitration, on the basis of respect for national sovereignty, between…

  • Issue Brief posted February 28, 2013 by James Phillips Kerry Offers More Aid but Still Lacks Sound Strategy on Syria

    Secretary of State John Kerry has embarked on his first official trip abroad, traveling to the United Kingdom, Germany, France, Italy, Turkey, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, and Qatar. Although NATO and European issues have been featured prominently in Kerry’s early stops, much of his agenda will focus on containing the destabilizing spillover effects of…

  • Commentary posted September 5, 2013 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. Reset America’s Mideast policy by focusing on Iran and Hezbollah

    Go in or keep out? It’s a false choice when it comes to addressing the situation in Syria. The main goal of U.S. foreign policy should be to protect and advance America’s global interests. A “punitive” and largely symbolic attack on Syria doesn’t do the job, nor does watching tragedy unfold while we sit on our hands. The “mission” President Obama has mapped out in…

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  • Issue Brief posted November 5, 2013 by James Phillips Greater Iraqi–American Cooperation Needed on Counterterrorism, Syria, and Iran

    Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki came to Washington last week in search of greater U.S. security assistance in battling the al-Qaeda-led insurgency that increasingly threatens Iraq's internal security as well as regional stability in the oil-rich Persian Gulf. The United States shares Maliki's goal of defeating al-Qaeda's franchise in Iraq, which has expanded into…

  • Issue Brief posted September 19, 2013 by Baker Spring, Brett D. Schaefer Framework for Removing Syrian Chemical Weapons: Reasons for Skepticism

    The framework agreement for destroying Syria’s chemical weapons (CW) arsenal and its supporting infrastructure[1] is imprecise, unrealistic, and unlikely to be fulfilled. On the basis of the requirements of the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC), which Syria has now agreed to join, and historical experience in executing the CWC, even under ideal circumstances and assuming…

  • Issue Brief posted September 11, 2013 by Brett D. Schaefer, Steven Groves Syria Policy Should Be Driven by U.S. Interests, Not the U.N.

    There are good reasons why Americans, under the current circumstances, should question a military intervention in Syria.[1] But President Obama has muddied the waters further by giving as much weight to international law as he did to U.S. interests in presenting his case for military intervention, frequently expressing the need to enforce an “international norm”…

  • Issue Brief posted September 11, 2013 by The Heritage Foundation Syria: Heritage Foundation Recommendations

    In the aftermath of Syrian dictator Bashar al-Assad’s use of chemical weapons against Syrian opposition forces, the U.S. urgently needs to develop a strategy not only to counter Assad’s use of chemical weapons but protect American interests in the Syrian crisis. The Heritage Foundation has long been focused on developing such policies, as seen in the following…

  • Issue Brief posted September 10, 2013 by James Phillips, Steven P. Bucci, Ph.D. After the Hearings: Syrian Intervention Still a Bad Idea

    The Obama Administration has failed to articulate U.S. national interests in Syria or offer a clear plan that justifies America’s direct involvement in the conflict. As Congress deliberates on the Administration’s request for the use of force, it should consider what is in the best interest of the U.S., what precedents might be set, and what practical considerations it…

  • Issue Brief posted May 29, 2013 by Ariel Cohen, Ph.D. Russian Missiles to Syria Endanger U.S. Foreign Policy Goals

    Russia is planning to supply Syria game-changing weapons which will shift the balance of power in the eastern Mediterranean in favor of President Bashar al-Assad’s regime and may make any future operations against the Assad forces considerably more difficult. If Moscow’s missile supply plans go through, the Russian advanced weapons systems would be able to target NATO…

  • Issue Brief posted May 16, 2013 by James Phillips Syria Crisis: U.S. Leadership Needed to Coordinate Allies

    One negative implication of the Obama Administration’s “lead from behind” efforts on the worsening Syria crisis is that U.S. allies have independently stepped forward to advance their own interests by backing various rival groups within the ad hoc Syrian opposition coalition. These external aid efforts, often pursued with little coordination, have bolstered Islamist…

  • Issue Brief posted May 15, 2013 by James Phillips U.S.–Turkish Relations: Greater Cooperation Should Be Goal of Obama–Erdogan Meeting

    Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan visits Washington this week amid escalating and intertwined Middle East crises. Turkey is a key NATO ally that borders Syria, Iran, and Iraq: three major focal points of U.S. Middle East policy. President Obama should consult with Prime Minister Erdogan to coordinate policies on these three fronts and to encourage Turkey to…

  • Issue Brief posted May 1, 2013 by James Phillips Syria's Chemical Weapons: U.S. Should Engage Syria's Opposition to Defuse Threat

    President Obama yesterday backpedaled away from taking immediate action on the Syrian chemical warfare issue. Caution on the chemical warfare issue is warranted, and Washington should clearly establish the facts to rule out the possibility that the chemical warfare reports are misinformation or disinformation. But as bad as the reported chemical attacks by Syria’s Bashar…

  • Issue Brief posted March 15, 2013 by James Phillips Obama’s Middle East Trip: Security Goals Should Be the Highest Priority

    President Obama’s upcoming trip to Israel, the West Bank, and Jordan comes at a tense time in an increasingly turbulent region. High on his agenda will be halting Iran’s nuclear weapons efforts, forging a common policy on containing the destabilizing spillover effects of Syria’s meltdown, and reviving the long-stalled Israeli–Palestinian peace negotiations. The President…

Find more work on Syria
Find more work on Syria