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United Kingdom

Historically, the “Special Relationship” between the United States and the United Kingdom has been the centerpiece of our efforts to strengthen security and spread liberty around the world. Maintaining the Anglo-American partnership remains critical to U.S. interests, particularly winning the war on terrorism, countering nuclear proliferation by such states as Iran and North Korea, and advancing our common principles and values on the global stage.

HIGHLIGHTS

Our Research & Offerings on United Kingdom
  • Commentary posted April 7, 2014 by Edwin J. Feulner, Ph.D. Remembering Margaret Thatcher a year after her death

    It’s no secret that your average politician avoids plain speaking at all costs. He mouths platitudes that sound good, but which enable him to dodge accountability and turn whichever way the wind happens to be blowing. So it’s always a bit startling when you hear one who lays it on the line. Using the following three examples, see if you can you identify one famous…

  • Commentary posted March 22, 2014 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Can Britain learn to stand up for itself?

    ONE way or another, Britain will have a national referendum on EU membership. But the point of the referendum is not to vote. It is to choose between different futures. The advocates of the EU, like Lord Mandelson, argue that Britain needs to “concentrate on using all of our influence and energy in building up Britain’s influence in Europe”. That is the same siren song…

  • Backgrounder posted February 13, 2014 by Luke Coffey Self-Determination and National Security: Why the U.S. Should Back British Sovereignty over Gibraltar

    The more than three-centuries-long dispute between Spain and the United Kingdom over the status of Gibraltar has been heating up again. The United States has interests at stake in the dispute. The U.S. benefits from its close relationship with Gibraltar as a British Overseas Territory in a way that would not be possible if Gibraltar was under the control of Spain. The…

  • Commentary posted November 23, 2013 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. UK needs freedom to pick talent from whole world

    Make no mistake, New York is a great city. I can’t visit it without a sense of ant-like awe. Yet while I respect New York, I love London. It’s gigantic, but it still feels like civilization on a human scale. I’ve been coming to Britain – not just London – regularly since 1989. But when I visited London again last month, I felt something different. New York is…

  • Commentary posted October 7, 2013 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Flexible relations will help Britain achieve a more prosperous future

    In public policy, what starts as the unthinkable can first become simply the impossible, then the undesirable, then the possible, then the inevitable – and, finally, the right choice all along. Forty years ago, permanent British membership of the EEC – as it then was – appeared all but inevitable. Now it’s Britain’s exit that is well into the ‘possible’ stage, with…

  • Lecture posted July 2, 2013 by Jim DeMint Britain and the U.S.: Two Peoples United by an Attachment to Self-Determination

    I would like to thank the Henry Jackson Society, not just for this event today, but for the very important work you do on transatlantic relations and security concerns. You stand up for freedom around the world, and I salute you for that. I would like to say one word about the man after whom you’re named. Scoop Jackson was the kind of Democrat I wish we had more of today.…

  • Play Movie The London Attacks: A Closer Look - Brookes on 'Cavuto' Video Recorded on May 22, 2013 The London Attacks: A Closer Look - Brookes on 'Cavuto'

    Senior Fellow Peter Brookes discusses the grizzly terrorism and murder in London on Fox News' 'Your World w/Cavuto'.…

  • Special Report posted April 29, 2013 by Robin Harris, D. Phil. Britain and Europe: Where America’s Interests Really Lie

    Introduction The United States has a strong and continuing interest in a prosperous and stable Europe, but the policies and pronouncements of President Barack Obama and the U.S. Department of State are making that goal less, not more, attainable. This is especially true as regards current, very public U.S. pressure on Britain to stay inside the European Union, apparently…

  • Backgrounder posted March 4, 2013 by Luke Coffey, Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D., Nile Gardiner, Ph.D. The United States Should Recognize British Sovereignty Over the Falkland Islands

    In 1982, the United Kingdom, led by Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, went to war with Argentina in the South Atlantic to retake the Falkland Islands. Unprovoked, Argentina had invaded the Islands and occupied them for two months. Against the odds, Prime Minister Thatcher assembled a naval task force and deployed it to the South Atlantic to liberate the Islands and their…

  • Heritage in Focus: Bullying the Falklands Audio Recorded on March 1, 2013 Heritage in Focus: Bullying the Falklands

    Fellows Luke Coffey and Ted Bromund discuss the century-long feud between Argentina and the United Kingdom over sovereignty of the Falkland Islands on this week's Heritage in Focus. Jackie Anderson hosts. To get regular updates on Heritage in Focus podcasts, visit our RSS feed or subscribe on iTunes.…

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  • Special Report posted February 22, 2012 by Robin Harris, D. Phil. The U.K. Governing Coalition: The Challenges Ahead and Why America Has a Stake in Britain’s Success

    Abstract: In May 2010, the U.K. general election resulted in a hung Parliament from which emerged a Conservative–Liberal Democrat coalition with Conservative leader David Cameron as Prime Minister. The experiment was widely justified by the evident need to cope with the economic crisis and, in particular, the unsustainable budget deficit inherited from the outgoing Labour…

  • Backgrounder posted November 18, 2008 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. British Defense Cuts Threaten the Anglo-American Special Relationship

    Great Britain is a founding member of NATO. It is currently fighting wars in both Iraq and Afghanistan, but is spending less of its gross domestic product (GDP) on its armed forces than at any point since the Great Depression. A failure of political leadership in Britain has allowed defense issues, and the standing of its Ministry of Defense (MoD), to slide to…

  • Lecture posted March 14, 2008 by Judge Inigo Bing The Urge to Over-Legislate: Criminal Law and Public Opinion in the United Kingdom

    May I first say how delighted I am to be speaking to you today at the prestigious Heritage Foundation. This is my fourth visit to the United States, but only my first to Washington. I first came to your country over 40 years ago when I was an English-Speaking Union student debater in colleges in the Midwest and West Coast debating with students on many campuses. I…

  • WebMemo posted July 19, 2010 by Brett D. Schaefer, Anthony B. Kim David Cameron and Barack Obama Must Advance Economic Freedom—Not More Foreign Aid

    British Prime Minister David Cameron and U.S. President Obama are scheduled to meet on July 20 at the White House. The issue of how the two leaders can take joint steps to spark greater global economic growth will be a major topic of discussion. Reevaluating Foreign Assistance Agendas As revealed during the G-20 meeting in June, the two countries…

  • Special Report posted June 6, 2011 by Robin Harris, D. Phil. Problems in British Foreign Policy

    Abstract It may take years before the results of NATO’s military operations against Colonel Muammar Qadhafi’s Libyan regime can finally be judged, but the issues raised by the crisis are of immediate importance. First, the way in which the operation has been conducted is a reminder of the importance to the United States of its European allies. The…

  • WebMemo posted October 26, 2010 by Nile Gardiner, Ph.D., Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D., J.D. Foster, Ph.D. The U.K. Budget Cuts: Lessons for the United States

    British Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne unveiled a series of major austerity cuts on October 20 aimed at eliminating Britain’s structural budget deficit by 2015, which currently stands at 11.4 percent of GDP.[1] The Conservative-led coalition government in London plans to cut a total of £81 billion ($130 billion) from public spending over the next four years,…

  • Backgrounder posted March 4, 2013 by Luke Coffey, Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D., Nile Gardiner, Ph.D. The United States Should Recognize British Sovereignty Over the Falkland Islands

    In 1982, the United Kingdom, led by Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, went to war with Argentina in the South Atlantic to retake the Falkland Islands. Unprovoked, Argentina had invaded the Islands and occupied them for two months. Against the odds, Prime Minister Thatcher assembled a naval task force and deployed it to the South Atlantic to liberate the Islands and their…

  • Backgrounder posted February 13, 2014 by Luke Coffey Self-Determination and National Security: Why the U.S. Should Back British Sovereignty over Gibraltar

    The more than three-centuries-long dispute between Spain and the United Kingdom over the status of Gibraltar has been heating up again. The United States has interests at stake in the dispute. The U.S. benefits from its close relationship with Gibraltar as a British Overseas Territory in a way that would not be possible if Gibraltar was under the control of Spain. The…

  • Commentary posted October 7, 2013 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Flexible relations will help Britain achieve a more prosperous future

    In public policy, what starts as the unthinkable can first become simply the impossible, then the undesirable, then the possible, then the inevitable – and, finally, the right choice all along. Forty years ago, permanent British membership of the EEC – as it then was – appeared all but inevitable. Now it’s Britain’s exit that is well into the ‘possible’ stage, with…

  • Commentary posted March 22, 2014 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Can Britain learn to stand up for itself?

    ONE way or another, Britain will have a national referendum on EU membership. But the point of the referendum is not to vote. It is to choose between different futures. The advocates of the EU, like Lord Mandelson, argue that Britain needs to “concentrate on using all of our influence and energy in building up Britain’s influence in Europe”. That is the same siren song…

Find more work on United Kingdom
Find more work on United Kingdom
Find more work on United Kingdom