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Pakistan

Pakistan is a Major non-NATO ally of the United States and an essential country for reducing terrorist threats from South Asia.

HIGHLIGHTS

Our Research & Offerings on Pakistan
  • Commentary posted March 16, 2015 by Huma Sattar China and Pakistan’s All-Weather Friendship

    Much to the befuddlement of the rest of the world – and as ironic as it is – Communist China and Islamic Pakistan are fast friends. It’s all hail to China in Pakistan and as other partnerships wither and die, these two countries continue to devote energy to strengthening their relationship. China has historically come to Pakistan’s rescue with economic, political,…

  • Commentary posted February 23, 2015 by Huma Sattar India-Pakistan: The Curious Case of the MFN Status

    For many years, Pakistan has been struggling with the idea of granting MFN status to India. In 2011, at least, it seemed that dialogue between the two countries was delivering some progress. MFN status appeared to be a matter of when, not if, and indeed this was candidly communicated to the business community and the media. The collegial agreement on the Composite…

  • Commentary posted November 17, 2014 by Lisa Curtis Will Pakistan Accept Afghanistan's Olive Branch?

    Afghanistan's new President Ashraf Ghani will visit Islamabad later this week in a bid to shore up relations that foundered badly under the previous Karzai regime. Since taking office six weeks ago, Ghani has prioritized building better ties with Pakistan and is exploring ways to start peace negotiations with Taliban insurgents, many of whom shelter inside Pakistan.…

  • Special Report posted October 8, 2014 by Walter Lohman, Olivia Enos, John Fleming 2014 Asia Update: What’s at Stake for America

    Introduction Economy Political Security Introduction Often overlooked in the tumult of Washington’s foreign policy debates is the remarkable consistency of U.S. foreign and trade policies over time. This is due to one immutable factor: American national interests. When U.S. policy moves away from our national interest, not only does it cease to…

  • Posted on May 13, 2014 by James Banks Pakistan: Islamist Parties Foster Violence and Intolerance

    At a recent event at The Heritage Foundation, Haroon K. Ullah discussed the influence of Islamist political parties in...…

  • Posted on May 5, 2014 by Olivia Enos South Asia Still Major Hotspot for International Terrorism

    Despite the degradation of al-Qaeda’s core leadership based in Pakistan and its increased reliance on regional affiliate...…

  • Posted on April 4, 2014 by Olivia Enos Terrorist Arrests in India Mark Victory Ahead of Elections

    Several members of the Indian Mujahideen (IM) terrorist group have been arrested in the lead up to elections in...…

  • Commentary posted April 2, 2014 by Lisa Curtis India and Pakistan Under Modi

    Indian election results will not be in for another six weeks, but the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) seems on track to win the most parliamentary seats, making it likely that Narendra Modi will be the country’s next prime minister. With Modi’s rise to power comes an increased likelihood of greater Indo-Pakistani tensions and potential for military escalation, especially if…

  • Posted on March 26, 2014 by Roy Howell Congressional Skepticism of Aid to Afghanistan Grows as U.S. Troops Withdraw

    As the U.S. continues to withdraw troops from Afghanistan, possibly all of them by the end of the year, Members of...…

  • Issue Brief posted March 24, 2014 by Lisa Curtis Afghanistan–Pakistan: U.S. Must Ensure that Its Military Gear Does Not Exacerbate Regional Tensions

    After 12 years of fighting against the Taliban in Afghanistan and failing to convince Pakistani leaders to crack down decisively on terrorist bases on their side of the border, American military planners are considering providing Pakistan with billions in leftover equipment from the war. A Washington Post story from last weekend indicates that U.S. military planners are…

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  • White Paper posted July 17, 2012 by Walter Lohman, John Fleming, Robert Warshaw Key Asian Indicators: A Book of Charts

    America’s Enduring Leadership in Asia America has been engaged in Asia since a few decades after securing its independence. Its early interest is documented in the 1833 Treaty on Amity and Commerce between the U.S. and the Kingdom of Siam Thailand), and later in the market-opening 1854 Treaty of Kanagawa with Japan. The U.S. has, in fact, been a “resident…

  • Special Report posted October 8, 2014 by Walter Lohman, Olivia Enos, John Fleming 2014 Asia Update: What’s at Stake for America

    Introduction Economy Political Security Introduction Often overlooked in the tumult of Washington’s foreign policy debates is the remarkable consistency of U.S. foreign and trade policies over time. This is due to one immutable factor: American national interests. When U.S. policy moves away from our national interest, not only does it cease to…

  • Lecture posted September 18, 2007 by Lisa Curtis Keeping Pakistan's Nuclear Weapons Out of the Hands of Terrorists

    Delivered June 27, 2007 The potential for the intersection of terrorism and nuclear weapons is arguably the greatest threat to American national, even global, security. As the U.S. seeks to deter the possibility of terrorists gaining access to nuclear weapons, it must consider carefully its policies toward Pakistan. The results of investiga­tions into…

  • Commentary posted March 16, 2015 by Huma Sattar China and Pakistan’s All-Weather Friendship

    Much to the befuddlement of the rest of the world – and as ironic as it is – Communist China and Islamic Pakistan are fast friends. It’s all hail to China in Pakistan and as other partnerships wither and die, these two countries continue to devote energy to strengthening their relationship. China has historically come to Pakistan’s rescue with economic, political,…

  • Commentary posted November 17, 2014 by Lisa Curtis Will Pakistan Accept Afghanistan's Olive Branch?

    Afghanistan's new President Ashraf Ghani will visit Islamabad later this week in a bid to shore up relations that foundered badly under the previous Karzai regime. Since taking office six weeks ago, Ghani has prioritized building better ties with Pakistan and is exploring ways to start peace negotiations with Taliban insurgents, many of whom shelter inside Pakistan.…

  • Issue Brief posted October 18, 2013 by Lisa Curtis U.S. Should Press China to Abide by NSG Rules on Pakistani Nuclear Cooperation

    China has agreed to provide Pakistan two new civil nuclear reactors, even though the U.S. and other countries have told the Chinese that the sale would violate its Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG) commitments. This action indicates that China is uninterested in working with the U.S. to promote stability in the subcontinent and instead is focused on supporting its historical…

  • WebMemo posted September 24, 2011 by Lisa Curtis U.S. Should React Strongly to Pakistan’s Involvement in Attack on U.S. Embassy

    Credible U.S. press reports yesterday revealed that cell phones found on the attackers in the September 13 attack on the U.S. embassy in Kabul were linked to Pakistani intelligence officials. The U.S. has long known that Pakistan’s intelligence agency, the Directorate of Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI), works closely with the Haqqani insurgent network, which has been…

  • Backgrounder posted March 15, 2010 by Maneeza Hossain, Lisa Curtis Bangladesh: Checking Islamist Extremism in a Pivotal Democracy

    Abstract: Bangladesh , the world's third largest Muslim-majority nation, is facing challenges from violent Islamist groups. The government is cracking down on radical groups and emphasizing the democratic principles of the country's founding, but radical Islamism still threatens to undermine stability in Bangladesh. Radicalization and terrorism…

  • Commentary posted May 25, 2012 by Peter Brookes Pride and Nationalism Trump Reason in Pakistan

    The latest in a long-string of problems in US-Pakistan relations is the sentencing of Pakistani doctor, Shakil Afridi, to 33 years in prison for treason.  And what, exactly, was the treasonous act?  Afridi allegedly participated in the intelligence operation that led to the takedown of Osama bin Laden last May. And just when you thought US-Pakistan relations couldn’t…

  • Commentary posted February 23, 2015 by Huma Sattar India-Pakistan: The Curious Case of the MFN Status

    For many years, Pakistan has been struggling with the idea of granting MFN status to India. In 2011, at least, it seemed that dialogue between the two countries was delivering some progress. MFN status appeared to be a matter of when, not if, and indeed this was candidly communicated to the business community and the media. The collegial agreement on the Composite…

Find more work on Pakistan
  • Special Report posted October 8, 2014 by Walter Lohman, Olivia Enos, John Fleming 2014 Asia Update: What’s at Stake for America

    Introduction Economy Political Security Introduction Often overlooked in the tumult of Washington’s foreign policy debates is the remarkable consistency of U.S. foreign and trade policies over time. This is due to one immutable factor: American national interests. When U.S. policy moves away from our national interest, not only does it cease to…

  • Issue Brief posted March 24, 2014 by Lisa Curtis Afghanistan–Pakistan: U.S. Must Ensure that Its Military Gear Does Not Exacerbate Regional Tensions

    After 12 years of fighting against the Taliban in Afghanistan and failing to convince Pakistani leaders to crack down decisively on terrorist bases on their side of the border, American military planners are considering providing Pakistan with billions in leftover equipment from the war. A Washington Post story from last weekend indicates that U.S. military planners are…

  • Issue Brief posted October 18, 2013 by Lisa Curtis U.S. Should Press China to Abide by NSG Rules on Pakistani Nuclear Cooperation

    China has agreed to provide Pakistan two new civil nuclear reactors, even though the U.S. and other countries have told the Chinese that the sale would violate its Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG) commitments. This action indicates that China is uninterested in working with the U.S. to promote stability in the subcontinent and instead is focused on supporting its historical…

  • Issue Brief posted May 14, 2013 by Lisa Curtis After Pakistan Election, U.S. Should Still Press Counterterrorism Agenda

    Pakistanis deserve credit for braving this weekend’s polls in the face of a ruthless campaign of bombings and shootings against candidates, election workers, public rallies and polling booths. With a fairly robust voter turnout of around 60 percent and marking the country’s first successful democratic transition, the elections represent a boost for civilian—over…

  • Issue Brief posted January 25, 2013 by Lisa Curtis Indo–Pakistani Tension: Pakistan Should Crack Down on Militant Infiltration

    Tensions between India and Pakistan are heating up along the Line of Control (LoC) that divides Kashmir. A series of border incidents in early January left three Pakistani and two Indian soldiers dead. One of the Indian soldiers was beheaded and another severely mutilated, provoking Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh to say that India’s ties with Pakistan would not be…

  • White Paper posted July 17, 2012 by Walter Lohman, John Fleming, Robert Warshaw Key Asian Indicators: A Book of Charts

    America’s Enduring Leadership in Asia America has been engaged in Asia since a few decades after securing its independence. Its early interest is documented in the 1833 Treaty on Amity and Commerce between the U.S. and the Kingdom of Siam Thailand), and later in the market-opening 1854 Treaty of Kanagawa with Japan. The U.S. has, in fact, been a “resident…

  • Issue Brief posted May 22, 2012 by Lisa Curtis Pakistan Missed Opportunity to Repair Ties with U.S.

    Pakistan missed a valuable opportunity to create goodwill with the U.S. and other NATO members when it failed to announce a reopening of NATO supply routes to Afghanistan at the summit held Sunday and Monday in Chicago. Not only has Pakistan’s closure of the supply routes over the past six months made the war effort more expensive for NATO members, but its failure to…

  • America at Risk Memo posted May 14, 2012 by Peter Brookes Protect America from What?

    A North Korean long-range ballistic missile launch into the Pacific Ocean, Russian threats of a preemptive strike against U.S. missile defenses in Europe, the Syrian regime’s continuing violence on protestors, and Taliban terrorist attacks in Afghanistan are just a few of the recent events that should serve to remind us that we are living in uncertain times…

  • Issue Brief posted March 21, 2012 by Lisa Curtis U.S.–Pakistan Reset: Still Need to Deal with Terrorist Sanctuaries

    A Pakistan parliamentary committee has released its recommendations for “resetting” the parameters of U.S.–Pakistan relations. U.S.–Pakistan ties have been severely strained since the November 26, 2011, NATO attack that killed 24 Pakistani soldiers along the border with Afghanistan. Since then, there have been no high-level U.S. visits to Pakistan, and NATO supply routes…

  • Issue Brief posted March 1, 2012 by Lisa Curtis U.S. Strategy in Afghanistan: Costs of Accelerating Troop Withdrawal Too High

    The situation in Afghanistan has spiraled downward over the past 10 days, but before making hasty decisions on next steps in Afghanistan, U.S. policymakers need to consider what has contributed to this ominous turn of events and what options there are for adjusting the U.S. strategy to avoid further such incidents. U.S. policymakers should also be aware that leaving…

Find more work on Pakistan
Find more work on Pakistan