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Pakistan

Pakistan is a Major non-NATO ally of the United States and an essential country for reducing terrorist threats from South Asia.

HIGHLIGHTS

Our Research & Offerings on Pakistan
  • Commentary posted April 2, 2014 by Lisa Curtis India and Pakistan Under Modi

    Indian election results will not be in for another six weeks, but the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) seems on track to win the most parliamentary seats, making it likely that Narendra Modi will be the country’s next prime minister. With Modi’s rise to power comes an increased likelihood of greater Indo-Pakistani tensions and potential for military escalation, especially if…

  • Issue Brief posted March 24, 2014 by Lisa Curtis Afghanistan–Pakistan: U.S. Must Ensure that Its Military Gear Does Not Exacerbate Regional Tensions

    After 12 years of fighting against the Taliban in Afghanistan and failing to convince Pakistani leaders to crack down decisively on terrorist bases on their side of the border, American military planners are considering providing Pakistan with billions in leftover equipment from the war. A Washington Post story from last weekend indicates that U.S. military planners are…

  • Testimony posted November 7, 2013 by Lisa Curtis After the Withdrawal: The Way Forward in Afghanistan and Pakistan (Part II)

    Testimony before the Subcommittee on the Middle East and North Africa and Subcommittee on Asia and the Pacific Committee on Foreign Affairs United States House of Representatives October 29, 2013 Lisa Curtis Senior Research Fellow, Asian Studies Center The Heritage Foundation My name is Lisa Curtis. I am Senior Research Fellow on South Asia in the Asian Studies…

  • Issue Brief posted October 18, 2013 by Lisa Curtis U.S. Should Press China to Abide by NSG Rules on Pakistani Nuclear Cooperation

    China has agreed to provide Pakistan two new civil nuclear reactors, even though the U.S. and other countries have told the Chinese that the sale would violate its Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG) commitments. This action indicates that China is uninterested in working with the U.S. to promote stability in the subcontinent and instead is focused on supporting its historical…

  • Commentary posted July 16, 2013 by Lisa Curtis Pakistan Makes Drones Necessary

    One of the central campaign platforms of newly elected Pakistani prime minister Nawaz Sharif was a promise to curb the use of U.S. drones on Pakistani territory. Indeed there has been a sharp reduction in the number of drone attacks conducted in Pakistan this year compared to the last three. But until Islamabad cracks down more aggressively on groups attacking U.S.…

  • Commentary posted July 16, 2013 by Lisa Curtis The Strategic Disconnect: There’s a Kayani in the Kerry-Khurshid Room

    US Secretary of State John Kerry’s visit to India this week focused largely on climate change and economic issues. From a US domestic perspective, this was no surprise. President Obama laid out Tuesday a sweeping plan for the US to address climate change and over 200 US Congressional leaders last week chastised India for discriminatory trade practices. In choosing this…

  • Issue Brief posted May 14, 2013 by Lisa Curtis After Pakistan Election, U.S. Should Still Press Counterterrorism Agenda

    Pakistanis deserve credit for braving this weekend’s polls in the face of a ruthless campaign of bombings and shootings against candidates, election workers, public rallies and polling booths. With a fairly robust voter turnout of around 60 percent and marking the country’s first successful democratic transition, the elections represent a boost for civilian—over…

  • Commentary posted April 29, 2013 by Lisa Curtis Pakistan's Troubled Election

    With violence against the mainstream political parties escalating, initial Pakistani excitement about the upcoming national elections is beginning to give way to fear that bombs, not ballots, will have the greatest impact on the outcome. Over the last several weeks, Pakistani observers have touted the fact that for the first time in the country’s history, a…

  • Issue Brief posted January 25, 2013 by Lisa Curtis Indo–Pakistani Tension: Pakistan Should Crack Down on Militant Infiltration

    Tensions between India and Pakistan are heating up along the Line of Control (LoC) that divides Kashmir. A series of border incidents in early January left three Pakistani and two Indian soldiers dead. One of the Indian soldiers was beheaded and another severely mutilated, provoking Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh to say that India’s ties with Pakistan would not be…

  • Testimony posted September 14, 2012 by Lisa Curtis Combating the Haqqani Terrorist Network

    Testimony before the Committee on Foreign Affairs, Subcommittee on Terrorism, Nonproliferation, and Trade, United States House of Representatives September 13, 2012 My name is Lisa Curtis. I am Senior Research Fellow on South Asia at The Heritage Foundation. The views I express in this testimony are my own and should not…

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  • Special Report posted August 24, 2011 by The Heritage Foundation Counterterrorism Task Force A Counterterrorism Strategy for the "Next Wave"

    Abstract: In June 2011, President Barack Obama released a new National Strategy for Counterterrorism. This document profoundly misreads the nature of the global transnational threat. Following this strategy for a few years will result in a resurgent threat as dangerous as that shortly after 9/11. Dealing with the “next wave” of transnational terrorism will require a…

  • Testimony posted November 7, 2013 by Lisa Curtis After the Withdrawal: The Way Forward in Afghanistan and Pakistan (Part II)

    Testimony before the Subcommittee on the Middle East and North Africa and Subcommittee on Asia and the Pacific Committee on Foreign Affairs United States House of Representatives October 29, 2013 Lisa Curtis Senior Research Fellow, Asian Studies Center The Heritage Foundation My name is Lisa Curtis. I am Senior Research Fellow on South Asia in the Asian Studies…

  • Issue Brief posted March 24, 2014 by Lisa Curtis Afghanistan–Pakistan: U.S. Must Ensure that Its Military Gear Does Not Exacerbate Regional Tensions

    After 12 years of fighting against the Taliban in Afghanistan and failing to convince Pakistani leaders to crack down decisively on terrorist bases on their side of the border, American military planners are considering providing Pakistan with billions in leftover equipment from the war. A Washington Post story from last weekend indicates that U.S. military planners are…

  • Factsheet on October 13, 2011 PAKISTAN: Time for Plan B

    The Main Obstacle to Progress in Afghanistan Is Pakistan Pakistan Proxies Conducting Brazen Attacks on U.S. Interests: The Pakistan-based Haqqani network of Afghan insurgents, which Admiral Mike Mullen called a “veritable arm” of Pakistan’s intelligence agency, was behind the attack on the U.S. embassy in Kabul on September 13. While Haqqani…

  • White Paper posted January 14, 2011 by Walter Lohman, John Fleming, Nicholas Hamisevicz Key Asian Indicators: A Book of Charts

    The global financial crisis has had a major impact on perceptions of American power and its relationships in Asia. Many of the perceptions are not founded on facts. Among the facts often overlooked: American companies invest far more abroad than does all of Asia combined. For every dollar the U.S. has invested in China it has invested two in Australia…

  • Commentary posted April 2, 2014 by Lisa Curtis India and Pakistan Under Modi

    Indian election results will not be in for another six weeks, but the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) seems on track to win the most parliamentary seats, making it likely that Narendra Modi will be the country’s next prime minister. With Modi’s rise to power comes an increased likelihood of greater Indo-Pakistani tensions and potential for military escalation, especially if…

  • Testimony posted September 14, 2012 by Lisa Curtis Combating the Haqqani Terrorist Network

    Testimony before the Committee on Foreign Affairs, Subcommittee on Terrorism, Nonproliferation, and Trade, United States House of Representatives September 13, 2012 My name is Lisa Curtis. I am Senior Research Fellow on South Asia at The Heritage Foundation. The views I express in this testimony are my own and should not…

  • Backgrounder posted January 19, 2012 by Lisa Curtis, Derek Scissors, Ph.D. The Limits of the Pakistan-China Alliance

    Abstract: After the U.S. raid on Osama bin Laden’s compound in Pakistan in May 2011, Pakistani political leaders played up their country’s relations with China, touting Beijing as an alternative partner to Washington. But China’s concerns over Pakistan’s future stability will likely limit the extent to which it will help Pakistan out of its economic difficulties. While…

  • White Paper posted July 17, 2012 by Walter Lohman, John Fleming, Robert Warshaw Key Asian Indicators: A Book of Charts

    America’s Enduring Leadership in Asia America has been engaged in Asia since a few decades after securing its independence. Its early interest is documented in the 1833 Treaty on Amity and Commerce between the U.S. and the Kingdom of Siam Thailand), and later in the market-opening 1854 Treaty of Kanagawa with Japan. The U.S. has, in fact, been a “resident…

  • Issue Brief posted October 18, 2013 by Lisa Curtis U.S. Should Press China to Abide by NSG Rules on Pakistani Nuclear Cooperation

    China has agreed to provide Pakistan two new civil nuclear reactors, even though the U.S. and other countries have told the Chinese that the sale would violate its Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG) commitments. This action indicates that China is uninterested in working with the U.S. to promote stability in the subcontinent and instead is focused on supporting its historical…

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  • Issue Brief posted March 24, 2014 by Lisa Curtis Afghanistan–Pakistan: U.S. Must Ensure that Its Military Gear Does Not Exacerbate Regional Tensions

    After 12 years of fighting against the Taliban in Afghanistan and failing to convince Pakistani leaders to crack down decisively on terrorist bases on their side of the border, American military planners are considering providing Pakistan with billions in leftover equipment from the war. A Washington Post story from last weekend indicates that U.S. military planners are…

  • Issue Brief posted October 18, 2013 by Lisa Curtis U.S. Should Press China to Abide by NSG Rules on Pakistani Nuclear Cooperation

    China has agreed to provide Pakistan two new civil nuclear reactors, even though the U.S. and other countries have told the Chinese that the sale would violate its Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG) commitments. This action indicates that China is uninterested in working with the U.S. to promote stability in the subcontinent and instead is focused on supporting its historical…

  • Issue Brief posted May 14, 2013 by Lisa Curtis After Pakistan Election, U.S. Should Still Press Counterterrorism Agenda

    Pakistanis deserve credit for braving this weekend’s polls in the face of a ruthless campaign of bombings and shootings against candidates, election workers, public rallies and polling booths. With a fairly robust voter turnout of around 60 percent and marking the country’s first successful democratic transition, the elections represent a boost for civilian—over…

  • Issue Brief posted January 25, 2013 by Lisa Curtis Indo–Pakistani Tension: Pakistan Should Crack Down on Militant Infiltration

    Tensions between India and Pakistan are heating up along the Line of Control (LoC) that divides Kashmir. A series of border incidents in early January left three Pakistani and two Indian soldiers dead. One of the Indian soldiers was beheaded and another severely mutilated, provoking Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh to say that India’s ties with Pakistan would not be…

  • White Paper posted July 17, 2012 by Walter Lohman, John Fleming, Robert Warshaw Key Asian Indicators: A Book of Charts

    America’s Enduring Leadership in Asia America has been engaged in Asia since a few decades after securing its independence. Its early interest is documented in the 1833 Treaty on Amity and Commerce between the U.S. and the Kingdom of Siam Thailand), and later in the market-opening 1854 Treaty of Kanagawa with Japan. The U.S. has, in fact, been a “resident…

  • Issue Brief posted May 22, 2012 by Lisa Curtis Pakistan Missed Opportunity to Repair Ties with U.S.

    Pakistan missed a valuable opportunity to create goodwill with the U.S. and other NATO members when it failed to announce a reopening of NATO supply routes to Afghanistan at the summit held Sunday and Monday in Chicago. Not only has Pakistan’s closure of the supply routes over the past six months made the war effort more expensive for NATO members, but its failure to…

  • America at Risk Memo posted May 14, 2012 by Peter Brookes Protect America from What?

    A North Korean long-range ballistic missile launch into the Pacific Ocean, Russian threats of a preemptive strike against U.S. missile defenses in Europe, the Syrian regime’s continuing violence on protestors, and Taliban terrorist attacks in Afghanistan are just a few of the recent events that should serve to remind us that we are living in uncertain times…

  • Issue Brief posted March 21, 2012 by Lisa Curtis U.S.–Pakistan Reset: Still Need to Deal with Terrorist Sanctuaries

    A Pakistan parliamentary committee has released its recommendations for “resetting” the parameters of U.S.–Pakistan relations. U.S.–Pakistan ties have been severely strained since the November 26, 2011, NATO attack that killed 24 Pakistani soldiers along the border with Afghanistan. Since then, there have been no high-level U.S. visits to Pakistan, and NATO supply routes…

  • Issue Brief posted March 1, 2012 by Lisa Curtis U.S. Strategy in Afghanistan: Costs of Accelerating Troop Withdrawal Too High

    The situation in Afghanistan has spiraled downward over the past 10 days, but before making hasty decisions on next steps in Afghanistan, U.S. policymakers need to consider what has contributed to this ominous turn of events and what options there are for adjusting the U.S. strategy to avoid further such incidents. U.S. policymakers should also be aware that leaving…

  • Backgrounder posted January 19, 2012 by Lisa Curtis, Derek Scissors, Ph.D. The Limits of the Pakistan-China Alliance

    Abstract: After the U.S. raid on Osama bin Laden’s compound in Pakistan in May 2011, Pakistani political leaders played up their country’s relations with China, touting Beijing as an alternative partner to Washington. But China’s concerns over Pakistan’s future stability will likely limit the extent to which it will help Pakistan out of its economic difficulties. While…

Find more work on Pakistan
Find more work on Pakistan