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China

China’s economic, military, and diplomatic capabilities are growing quickly, helping it to emerge as a possible peer competitor to the United States in the Asia-Pacific. China’s economic opportunities offer areas for cooperation and discussion, yet its political and military ambitions still create uncertainty amongst its neighbors and the United States.

HIGHLIGHTS

Our Research & Offerings on China
  • Commentary posted April 10, 2014 by William T. Wilson, Ph.D. China Faces Just What It Needs: A Hard Landing

    Former Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping's famous expression "cross a river by feeling the stones" meant implementing economic reforms slowly and pragmatically. During the early stages of reform, this approach worked fairly well. Today, however, it is seriously dated. Indeed, it has put China's economy in a precarious state. The world's second-largest economy is headed for…

  • Testimony posted April 9, 2014 by Dean Cheng Prospects for U.S.-China Space Cooperation

    Testimony before the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation United States Senate My name is Dean Cheng. I am the Senior Research Fellow for Chinese political and security affairs at The Heritage Foundation. The views I express in this testimony are my own, and should not be construed as representing any official position of The Heritage Foundation. My comments…

  • Backgrounder posted March 19, 2014 by Dean Cheng Taiwan’s Maritime Security: A Critical American Interest

    Taiwan’s security is inextricably linked to the sea. Indeed, the island’s economic livelihood, as well as its national security, requires that Taipei secure the surrounding waters and have access to global sea-lanes. Consequently, Taiwan’s ability to field a modern navy is an essential element of its security strategy. The Taiwan Strait is a key international waterway,…

  • Testimony posted March 13, 2014 by Walter Lohman A China Focused Policy for Southeast Asia

    Testimony before the US-China Economic and Security Review My name is Walter Lohman. I am Director of the Asian Studies Center at The Heritage Foundation. The views I express in this testimony are my own and should not be construed as representing any official position of The Heritage Foundation. Now and for many decades to come, peace and prosperity in the Western…

  • Commentary posted March 5, 2014 by Kim R. Holmes, Ph.D. The world as it is

    “To succeed, we must face the world as it is.” So the administration declared in its 2010 National Security Strategy statement. That should be a truism in national security strategy. Unfortunately, the administration has let wishful thinking trump reality. Its conventional wisdom has been that rivalries between great powers were things of the past. The balance of…

  • Commentary posted February 5, 2014 by Kim R. Holmes, Ph.D. U.S. needs to stand firm against Chinese aggression

    China’s rise has the Obama administration looking as uncertain as the proverbial deer in the headlights. Caught between the unappealing alternatives of embracing or containing China, it largely chooses inaction. Its famous “pivot” to Asia has stalled — a casualty of Secretary of State John F. Kerry’s near obsession with the Middle East. There has been little meaningful…

  • Issue Brief posted January 24, 2014 by Dean Cheng Meeting the Challenge of Chinese Expansionism on the East Asian Littoral

    Over the past several months, the People’s Republic of China (PRC) has exploited more and more tools to reinforce its claims over much of the East Asian littoral. The intended Chinese message seems clear: Administratively, militarily, diplomatically, and economically, the East Asian littoral is under Chinese dominance. Ironically, even as the Chinese have been…

  • Commentary posted January 6, 2014 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. Why a U.S.-China "G2" Won't Work

    Back in 2009, it seemed that all the White House had to do to demonstrate wisdom was to declare that the solution—whatever the problem—was "Anything But Bush" (ABB). Those were heady days for the Obama administration. How to deal with China? The ABB solution was the G-2, or Group of Two. It was quite the hot idea—before it flamed out. The logic behind the G-2 was pretty…

  • Commentary posted January 2, 2014 by Jim Talent From Russia with Love

    Vassily Kashin, who is a Russian senior research fellow and China expert at the Center for Analysis of Strategies and Technologies in Moscow, recently posted an article on the website of the Voice of Russia, in which he discusses the shifting balance of power in the Pacific. An account of his commentary was reported here on the Taiwanese website Want China Times. For…

  • Commentary posted December 29, 2013 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. 'Black swans' to watch out for in 2014

    Americans will die on American soil in large numbers. So predicted the Hart-Rudman Commission seven months before the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. No commissioner felt good about it getting it right. But the purpose of identifying "black swan" events before they happen is to give our leaders a chance to prevent them. Here are some black swans that threaten to nest next…

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  • Testimony posted April 9, 2014 by Dean Cheng Prospects for U.S.-China Space Cooperation

    Testimony before the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation United States Senate My name is Dean Cheng. I am the Senior Research Fellow for Chinese political and security affairs at The Heritage Foundation. The views I express in this testimony are my own, and should not be construed as representing any official position of The Heritage Foundation. My comments…

  • Backgrounder posted April 14, 2011 by Derek Scissors, Ph.D. The United States vs. China—Which Economy Is Bigger, Which Is Better

    Abstract: China’s leap from poverty due to the marvelously successful market reforms introduced in 1978 has obscured serious weaknesses in its economy—especially compared to the American economy. These weaknesses have been exacerbated by renewed Chinese state intervention that began around 2003. Many seem convinced that China is at the cusp of surpassing the U.S.…

  • Lecture posted April 1, 2013 by Franklin L. Lavin Four Issues Facing China

    It’s a delight to be here. I enjoy coming by and seeing friends, making new friends, and sharing ideas and insight. I have a terrific job—not just the job itself, which is interesting, but the fact that it’s a China-oriented job, and that it allows me, every time I visit China, to learn and to see and to chat with people. It was certainly interesting to do that in a…

  • Special Report posted October 11, 2012 by Dean Cheng The Complicated History of U.S. Relations with China

    Trade, Faith, and Freedom: The Foundations of U.S. Relations with China Americans have been interested in China for a long time. In 1784, when the American War for Independence was barely over, the first ship to sail under an American flag left New York. It was the merchant ship Empress of China, bound for Canton (now Guangdong), China. At…

  • Commentary posted February 2, 2010 by Lee Edwards, Ph.D. The Legacy of Mao Zedong is Mass Murder

    Can you name the greatest mass murderer of the 20th century? No, it wasn’t Hitler or Stalin. It was Mao Zedong. According to the authoritative “Black Book of Communism,” an estimated 65 million Chinese died as a result of Mao’s repeated, merciless attempts to create a new “socialist” China. Anyone who got in his way was done away with -- by execution, imprisonment…

  • Commentary posted April 10, 2014 by William T. Wilson, Ph.D. China Faces Just What It Needs: A Hard Landing

    Former Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping's famous expression "cross a river by feeling the stones" meant implementing economic reforms slowly and pragmatically. During the early stages of reform, this approach worked fairly well. Today, however, it is seriously dated. Indeed, it has put China's economy in a precarious state. The world's second-largest economy is headed for…

  • Backgrounder posted April 26, 2002 by John J. Tkacik, Jr. Stating America's Case to China's Hu Jintao: A Primer on U.S.-China-Taiwan Policy

    As Washington prepares for the April 29 arrival of China's heir apparent, Vice President Hu Jintao, the depth of misinformation that beclouds relations with China should encourage policymakers to refresh their understandings of basic documents and principles that guide U.S. policy toward Taiwan so that no statements can be taken out of context or assigned a broader…

  • Backgrounder posted April 29, 2013 by Bryan Riley Tariff Reform Needed to Boost the U.S. Economy

    Congress routinely engages in targeted, short-term tariff cuts through “miscellaneous tariff bills.” Although conventional wisdom says that unilateral tariff cuts are politically impossible, these bills show that it is possible to reduce tariffs given the right political environment. Proponents of such tariff cuts argue that the cuts support U.S. jobs; critics argue that…

  • Special Report posted October 11, 2012 by Derek Scissors, Ph.D. The U.S. and China: Jobs, Trade, and More

    China has the second-largest economy in the world. It is the world’s second-biggest trader. It has trillions of dollars invested around the world. China matters. Every day we buy things made in China, though they may be made there by American or Dutch or Korean corporations. China buys a lot of our government’s debt and lately it has been buying small pieces of…

  • Issue Brief posted July 16, 2013 by Derek Scissors, Ph.D. China’s Steady Global Investment: American Choices

    The tidal wave of Chinese investment around the world predicted by some and feared by others has not materialized and is unlikely to. Various obstacles to overseas spending by the People’s Republic of China (PRC) kept growth moderate in the first half of 2013. Energy was again the focus, but the dominance of state-owned enterprises has begun to ease. Chinese investment in…

Find more work on China
  • Backgrounder posted March 19, 2014 by Dean Cheng Taiwan’s Maritime Security: A Critical American Interest

    Taiwan’s security is inextricably linked to the sea. Indeed, the island’s economic livelihood, as well as its national security, requires that Taipei secure the surrounding waters and have access to global sea-lanes. Consequently, Taiwan’s ability to field a modern navy is an essential element of its security strategy. The Taiwan Strait is a key international waterway,…

  • Issue Brief posted January 24, 2014 by Dean Cheng Meeting the Challenge of Chinese Expansionism on the East Asian Littoral

    Over the past several months, the People’s Republic of China (PRC) has exploited more and more tools to reinforce its claims over much of the East Asian littoral. The intended Chinese message seems clear: Administratively, militarily, diplomatically, and economically, the East Asian littoral is under Chinese dominance. Ironically, even as the Chinese have been…

  • Issue Brief posted December 18, 2013 by Rebeccah Heinrichs China’s Strategic Capabilities and Intent

    Over the past year, the Chinese have been steadily improving their strategic military capabilities. It is becoming clearer that China is developing and building capabilities to have an impact beyond Asia; indeed, recent developments indicate that China is preparing a force meant to challenge and deter the United States. China’s Nuclear Policy: Official and…

  • Issue Brief posted October 18, 2013 by Lisa Curtis U.S. Should Press China to Abide by NSG Rules on Pakistani Nuclear Cooperation

    China has agreed to provide Pakistan two new civil nuclear reactors, even though the U.S. and other countries have told the Chinese that the sale would violate its Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG) commitments. This action indicates that China is uninterested in working with the U.S. to promote stability in the subcontinent and instead is focused on supporting its historical…

  • Special Report posted October 7, 2013 by Walter Lohman, John Fleming, Olivia Enos A New View of Asia: 24 Charts that Show What's at Stake for America

    The Asian Studies Center Introduction Geography Economic Stakes Political Stakes Security Challenges Introduction: A New View of America's "Near West" At The Heritage Foundation’s annual B. C. Lee Lecture this year, the Chairman of the House Committee on Foreign Affairs summed up perfectly America’s destiny as regards Asia: It is America’s “Near…

  • Backgrounder posted September 12, 2013 by Dean Cheng, Ariel Cohen, Ph.D. How Washington Should Manage U.S.–Russia–China Relations

    As the Obama Administration focuses on the Middle East and Europe and the U.S. cuts its defense budget, the Russian Federation and the People’s Republic of China (PRC) are striving to deepen their relationship. The leaders of the two major Eurasian powers have conducted a series of high-priority, high-level official reciprocal diplomatic visits. In the aftermath of the…

  • Issue Brief posted September 6, 2013 by Dean Cheng How the U.S. Should Respond to the Chinese Naval Challenge

    Over the past year, China’s leadership has indicated that it is intent upon pushing maritime development. In a recent study session involving the top Chinese leadership, Chinese leader Xi Jinping emphasized the importance of the sea for China’s economic development and national security, and reiterated the need to make China a “strong maritime nation.”[1] This appears to…

  • Backgrounder posted September 4, 2013 by Derek Scissors, Ph.D. How to Make China More Honest

    China is far more economically open today than the Soviet Union was when its collapse surprised the U.S. policy community in 1991. Still, the Chinese Communist Party controls and manipulates the information it releases. The prevailing American view of the People’s Republic of China (PRC) as a rising economic superpower, even if struggling a bit, is based on this poor…

  • Issue Brief posted August 12, 2013 by Derek Scissors, Ph.D. The U.S. Should Be Wary of Fake Chinese Economic Reform

    Better late than never. The absence of pro-market economic reform in China is now widely recognized, if years too late. Much of the world awaits the Communist Party’s autumn plenary meetings, hoping for a restart of the process. According to General Secretary Xi Jinping, his new government will “deepen” reform.[1] But what is packaged as reform will not be welcome outside…

  • Issue Brief posted July 16, 2013 by Derek Scissors, Ph.D. China’s Steady Global Investment: American Choices

    The tidal wave of Chinese investment around the world predicted by some and feared by others has not materialized and is unlikely to. Various obstacles to overseas spending by the People’s Republic of China (PRC) kept growth moderate in the first half of 2013. Energy was again the focus, but the dominance of state-owned enterprises has begun to ease. Chinese investment in…

Find more work on China
Find more work on China