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Australia

Australia is a treaty ally of the United States, and an important partner on economic and security affairs. It has stood by the U.S. in every major conflict of the last 100 years.

HIGHLIGHTS

Our Research & Offerings on Australia
  • Commentary posted November 18, 2014 by James M. Roberts Australia Can Lead the G20 Back to Economic Freedom

    President Obama and other G20 leaders should listen carefully this weekend (Nov. 15-16) in Brisbane, because Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott has a powerful story to tell them about economic revival. Abbott hopes to focus the gathered heads of state— representing some 80 per cent of the world’s Gross Domestic Product—on how to boost economic growth because, as he…

  • Special Report posted October 8, 2014 by Walter Lohman, Olivia Enos, John Fleming 2014 Asia Update: What’s at Stake for America

    Introduction Economy Political Security Introduction Often overlooked in the tumult of Washington’s foreign policy debates is the remarkable consistency of U.S. foreign and trade policies over time. This is due to one immutable factor: American national interests. When U.S. policy moves away from our national interest, not only does it cease to…

  • Special Report posted October 7, 2013 by Walter Lohman, John Fleming, Olivia Enos A New View of Asia: 24 Charts that Show What's at Stake for America

    The Asian Studies Center Introduction Geography Economic Stakes Political Stakes Security Challenges Introduction: A New View of America's "Near West" At The Heritage Foundation’s annual B. C. Lee Lecture this year, the Chairman of the House Committee on Foreign Affairs summed up perfectly America’s destiny as regards Asia: It is America’s “Near…

  • Issue Brief posted November 13, 2012 by Jessica Zuckerman Global Entry Reciprocity: U.S. Should Follow Australia’s Lead

    Visiting the land down under just became easier for a number of American travelers. On November 1, U.S. Customs and Border Protection and the Australian Customs and Border Protection Service announced a trial program extending Australia’s SmartGate program to U.S. Global Entry members. The announcement marked a step in the right direction in creating a trusted…

  • Lecture posted November 2, 2012 by The Honorable Tony Abbott The Australia–U.S. Alliance and Leadership in the Asia–Pacific

    Abstract The Administration has indicated that it plans to “pivot” America’s security focus to Asia. The Administration’s plans to downsize the U.S. military, however, can only mean a reduced U.S. presence globally and greater strain on our forces and equipment wherever they are deployed. Allies like Australia are trying to understand the implications for the…

  • Commentary posted August 9, 2012 by Walter Lohman Australia an Exceptional American Ally in Pacific

    Maintaining the balance of power in the Pacific requires strong allies. And as Tony Abbott, the opposition leader in Australia’s Liberal Party (conservative in the American sense) noted last month in a remarkable speech at The Heritage Foundation, the U.S. has a particularly strong ally in Australia. Mr. Abbott identified an alliance based on shared values as much…

  • White Paper posted July 17, 2012 by Walter Lohman, John Fleming, Robert Warshaw Key Asian Indicators: A Book of Charts

    America’s Enduring Leadership in Asia America has been engaged in Asia since a few decades after securing its independence. Its early interest is documented in the 1833 Treaty on Amity and Commerce between the U.S. and the Kingdom of Siam Thailand), and later in the market-opening 1854 Treaty of Kanagawa with Japan. The U.S. has, in fact, been a “resident…

  • Special Report posted November 3, 2011 by Lisa Curtis, Walter Lohman, Rory Medcalf, Lydia Powell, Rajeswari Pillai Rajagopalan, Ph.D., Andrew Shearer Shared Goals, Converging Interests: A Plan for U.S.–Australia–India Cooperation in the Indo–Pacific

    A Joint Project by Scholars from The Heritage Foundation, the Lowy Institute for International Policy, and the Observer Research Foundation Abstract: The U.S., Australia, and India face common challenges and opportunities in the Indo–Pacific region that are defined by their shared values and interests. These include sea-lane security, counterterrorism,…

  • WebMemo posted March 9, 2011 by Derek Scissors, Ph.D. Australia–China Economic Relations: A Lesson for the U.S., Not a Threat

    China is rising in importance for Australia economically. What does this mean for security relations? Not what some people—including very influential, serious Australians—seem to think.[1] There is nothing about China’s economic rise that gives it effective leverage over Australian foreign and defense policy or that necessarily supplants American leadership in the…

  • White Paper posted January 14, 2011 by Walter Lohman, John Fleming, Nicholas Hamisevicz Key Asian Indicators: A Book of Charts

    The global financial crisis has had a major impact on perceptions of American power and its relationships in Asia. Many of the perceptions are not founded on facts. Among the facts often overlooked: American companies invest far more abroad than does all of Asia combined. For every dollar the U.S. has invested in China it has invested two in Australia…

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  • Backgrounder posted June 19, 2008 by John J. Tkacik, Jr. Taiwan's "Unsettled" International Status: Preserving U.S. Options in the Pacific

    Ma Ying-jeou, inaugurated as Taiwan's new president on May 20, 2008, has pledged to strengthen Taiwan's economic and political relationships with China. At the same time, he has good reason to preserve Taiwan's separate identity, and the U.S. has good reason to support him. Taiwan is one of the most dynamic democracies in Asia and one of America's top 10 trade partners.…

  • Special Report posted October 8, 2014 by Walter Lohman, Olivia Enos, John Fleming 2014 Asia Update: What’s at Stake for America

    Introduction Economy Political Security Introduction Often overlooked in the tumult of Washington’s foreign policy debates is the remarkable consistency of U.S. foreign and trade policies over time. This is due to one immutable factor: American national interests. When U.S. policy moves away from our national interest, not only does it cease to…

  • Backgrounder posted May 28, 2009 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Contracting Out in Defense: Lessons from the British Experience for the U.S. and Great Britain

    Contracting out in defense is an important public and political issue in the United States. When based on the proper principles, contracting out allows the government to draw on the skills and resources of the private sector to deliver services more efficiently. Although the British and U.S. programs are financed differently, Britain's experience offers important…

  • Lecture posted November 2, 2012 by The Honorable Tony Abbott The Australia–U.S. Alliance and Leadership in the Asia–Pacific

    Abstract The Administration has indicated that it plans to “pivot” America’s security focus to Asia. The Administration’s plans to downsize the U.S. military, however, can only mean a reduced U.S. presence globally and greater strain on our forces and equipment wherever they are deployed. Allies like Australia are trying to understand the implications for the…

  • Lecture posted January 3, 2011 by The Honorable John Howard The Anglosphere and the Advance of Freedom

    Abstract: The ties that bind the U.S., Great Britain, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and in different ways other nations that share some of the values of the Anglosphere are deeper and more abiding, says former Australian Prime Minister John Howard, than the bonds between any other countries with which his country has been associated. The English-speaking nations have…

  • Special Report posted October 7, 2013 by Walter Lohman, John Fleming, Olivia Enos A New View of Asia: 24 Charts that Show What's at Stake for America

    The Asian Studies Center Introduction Geography Economic Stakes Political Stakes Security Challenges Introduction: A New View of America's "Near West" At The Heritage Foundation’s annual B. C. Lee Lecture this year, the Chairman of the House Committee on Foreign Affairs summed up perfectly America’s destiny as regards Asia: It is America’s “Near…

  • Backgrounder posted August 26, 2009 by Bruce Klingner How to Save the U.S.-Japan Alliance

    Countless official statements by the U.S. and Japan have highlighted the two countries' bilateral alliance as the linchpin or cornerstone of stability in Asia and indispensable to achieving the strategic objectives of both countries. Although true, such assertions are faulty on two counts: (1) they overlook the parallel criticality of the U.S.-South Korean alliance,…

  • WebMemo posted June 24, 2009 by Mackenzie Eaglen, Eric Sayers 2010 Defense Authorization Bill: Merits and Flaws of House Armed Services Bill H.R. 2647

    The U.S. House of Representatives Armed Services Committee will complete its markup of H.R.2647, the National Defense Authorization Act for fiscal year (FY) 2010, last week. The full House will likely begin debate and pass its version this week. While considering the legislation, committee members made several important steps to begin reversing some of…

  • WebMemo posted March 18, 2010 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Now Is the Time to Seek Ratification of the U.S.–Australia Defense Trade Cooperation Treaty

    The U.S.–Australia Defense Trade Cooperation Treaty would permit the U.S. to trade many defense articles with Australia without an export license or other written authorization. The treaty would advance American interests by: Reducing barriers to defense-related trade and so increasing exports; Improving the procurement process in both nations; and,…

  • Commentary posted November 18, 2014 by James M. Roberts Australia Can Lead the G20 Back to Economic Freedom

    President Obama and other G20 leaders should listen carefully this weekend (Nov. 15-16) in Brisbane, because Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott has a powerful story to tell them about economic revival. Abbott hopes to focus the gathered heads of state— representing some 80 per cent of the world’s Gross Domestic Product—on how to boost economic growth because, as he…

Find more work on Australia
Find more work on Australia
Find more work on Australia