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Asia

The size and dynamism of Asia makes its development a determining factor in protecting and promoting American interests and values. With over half of the global population, the fastest growing economies in the world, freedom and tyranny living side by side, and five treaty alliances of the United States, American leadership in Asia is vital for a free and prosperous region.

HIGHLIGHTS

Our Research & Offerings on Asia
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  • Backgrounder posted February 22, 2006 by Peter Brookes, Ji Hye Shin China's Influence in Africa: Implications for the United States

    Amid growing concerns about the People's Republic of China's burgeoning influence around the globe, Beijing has now set its sights on Africa. China's interest in Africa is not new. In the 1960s and 1970s, Beijing's interest centered on building ideological solidarity with other underdeveloped nations to advance Chinese-style communism and on repelling Western…

  • Backgrounder posted September 5, 2001 by Dana Robert  Dillon How the Bush Administration Should Handle China

    In August 2001 the United States Navy held a two-carrier passing exercise in the South China Sea. Navy spokesmen denied that the exercise was intended to send a message to China, but it was in the right location to do just that. In fact, Washington needs to do a lot more of the same as a first step toward protecting American interests in the South China…

  • Issue Brief posted January 12, 2015 by Dean Cheng Why Taiwan Needs Submarines

    In 2001, President George W. Bush’s Administration agreed to a major arms sale to Taiwan. Approved for sale to Taipei were anti-submarine warfare aircraft, anti-ship missiles, self-propelled howitzers, minesweepers, and destroyers. The United States also agreed to help Taiwan obtain new diesel-electric submarines, to modernize the island’s underwater forces. At the time,…

  • Backgrounder posted October 23, 2001 by Dana Robert Dillon, Paolo Pasicolan Southeast Asia and the War Against Terrorism

    Having completed the initial wave of air strikes on Afghanistan, the United States has deployed Special Forces troops to Central Asia, the front line in America's war on terrorism. The task is clear: to hunt down Osama bin Laden and his al-Qaeda network of terrorists who are responsible for the September 11 attacks as well as other acts of terrorism against…

  • Commentary posted October 14, 2006 by Tim Chapman Half Right Is Still Half Wrong

    Most observers probably missed it, but President Bush and the Republicans in Congress scored a significant victory this week. The latest economic numbers show the federal deficit is at a four-year low, thanks to higher than expected federal revenues. Bush correctly points out that this cash infusion is a result of his hard-fought tax cuts. In a news conference…

  • Executive Memorandum posted June 12, 2002 by Dana Robert Dillon Military Engagement with Indonesia in the War on Terrorism

    The Bush Administration is asking Congress for $16 million in assistance for Indonesia: $8 million for "humanitarian and peacekeeping" operations and $8 million to train a "counterterrorism unit" there. This would be added to a $17.9 million program under the Defense Department Appropriations Act (P.L. 107-117) that allows Indonesian military officers to…

  • Backgrounder posted April 26, 2002 by John J. Tkacik, Jr. Stating America's Case to China's Hu Jintao: A Primer on U.S.-China-Taiwan Policy

    As Washington prepares for the April 29 arrival of China's heir apparent, Vice President Hu Jintao, the depth of misinformation that beclouds relations with China should encourage policymakers to refresh their understandings of basic documents and principles that guide U.S. policy toward Taiwan so that no statements can be taken out of context or assigned a broader…

  • Commentary posted December 5, 2003 by John J. Tkacik, Jr. China Pulls at Bush's Three Pillars

    A new and terrifying stridency in China's rhetoric against Taiwan's democracy is shaking at least two of the "Three Pillars" of U.S. President George W. Bush's foreign policy on the eve of Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao's visit to Washington. The rhetoric already seems to have rattled Mr. Bush, who reacted by sending a personal messenger to ask Taiwan President Chen…

  • Commentary posted September 20, 2004 by John J. Tkacik, Jr. End U.S. Foot-Dragging on Taiwan Sale

    Should the United States treat Taiwan like any other friendly or allied country? This question has become more critical recently as U.S. President George W. Bush's administration has delayed issuing a routine congressional notification of arms sales to Taipei. There is growing fear that Chinese pressure is taking a toll, and every hint of U.S. reluctance only…

  • Commentary posted November 4, 2002 by John J. Tkacik, Jr. ED110402:  More Oil for North Korea

    The word "nullification" might sound clear to the casual observer. But the administration of U.S. President George W. Bush seems to think otherwise, judging from its hesitation over whether to stop more free fuel oil from being shipped to Pyongyang tomorrow. On Tuesday a supertanker is scheduled to depart Singapore for the North Korean port of Wonsan with a…

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  • Testimony posted March 29, 2016 by Walter Lohman After the Rebalance to Asia

    After the Rebalance to Asia U.S.–China Economic and Security Review Commission March 31, 2016 My name is Walter Lohman. I am Director of the Asian Studies Center at The Heritage Foundation. The views I express in this testimony are my own and should not be construed as representing any official position of The Heritage Foundation. For five years now, Washington has…

  • Backgrounder posted March 28, 2016 by Justin T. Johnson, Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D., James Jay Carafano, Ph.D., Dean Cheng, Luke Coffey, Lisa Curtis, Michaela Dodge, David Inserra, Bruce Klingner, Walter Lohman, James Phillips, Ana Quintana, Bryan Riley, Brian Slattery, Charles "Cully" Stimson, Dakota Wood, Rachel Zissimos The 2017 NDAA Should Begin Rebuilding America’s Military

    The National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) is an annual bill that sets policies and budgets for the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD). This bill and the defense appropriations bill are Congress’s two annual major pieces of defense legislation. With the release of the Obama Administration’s fiscal year (FY) 2017 budget request, Congress has begun working on the NDAA.…

  • Special Report posted December 31, 2015 by Walter Lohman, John Fleming, Olivia Enos 2015 Asia Update: The Trends and What They Mean for America

    The Asian Studies Center America's Commitment to the Pacific Previous editions of this product have illustrated America’s resident power status in Asia and the continuing, critical importance of its commitment to leadership there. They have sought to demonstrate in graphic fashion what is at stake for the U.S. from the economy to security to human liberty. This year’s…

  • Lecture posted August 11, 2015 by James Talent U.S. National Security and Rising China

    The 2014 B. C. Lee Lecture Delivered Monday, December 8, 2014 THE HONORABLE JIM DEMINT: This is a special event at Heritage, the annual B.C. Lee Lecture. The B.C. Lee Lecture is named for the founder of Samsung, a man of real vision for the U.S.–Korean alliance and South Korea’s role in the world. He was a remarkable entrepreneur and leader. I had the pleasure of meeting…

  • Issue Brief posted January 12, 2015 by Dean Cheng Why Taiwan Needs Submarines

    In 2001, President George W. Bush’s Administration agreed to a major arms sale to Taiwan. Approved for sale to Taipei were anti-submarine warfare aircraft, anti-ship missiles, self-propelled howitzers, minesweepers, and destroyers. The United States also agreed to help Taiwan obtain new diesel-electric submarines, to modernize the island’s underwater forces. At the time,…

  • Special Report posted October 8, 2014 by Walter Lohman, Olivia Enos, John Fleming 2014 Asia Update: What’s at Stake for America

    Introduction Economy Political Security Introduction Often overlooked in the tumult of Washington’s foreign policy debates is the remarkable consistency of U.S. foreign and trade policies over time. This is due to one immutable factor: American national interests. When U.S. policy moves away from our national interest, not only does it cease to serve its…

  • Issue Brief posted September 25, 2014 by Ryan Olson Obama Should Push Modi on Trade Facilitation

    This week President Barack Obama will welcome new Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi to Washington for their first bilateral summit. In Geneva, the Trade Facilitation Preparatory Committee of the World Trade Organization (WTO) will also be meeting. The timing of these two events provides an opportunity to measure India’s commitment to trade freedom and to push Modi to…

  • Issue Brief posted September 24, 2014 by Lisa Curtis Priorities for Prime Minister Modi’s Visit: U.S. and India Must Cooperate for Asian Stability

    Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s visit to the United States next week provides an opportunity to strengthen U.S.–India ties, which stagnated during the second term of Modi’s predecessor, Manmohan Singh. During the visit, President Barack Obama should demonstrate the importance the U.S. attaches to the bilateral relationship and offer cooperation on economic, defense,…

  • Issue Brief posted September 17, 2014 by Bruce Klingner U.S. Should Seek Release of Detainees in North Korea—Without Policy Concessions

    North Korea has sentenced Matthew Miller, a 20-year-old American tourist, to six years of hard labor for attempted espionage. Miller reportedly ripped up his tourist visa and declared he wanted asylum but Pyongyang accused him of intending to “experience prison life so that he could investigate the human rights situation” in North Korea. The regime is also holding Jeffrey…

  • Lecture posted September 15, 2014 by Lisa Curtis An Opportunity to Reenergize U.S.–India Relations

    Lisa Curtis If ever there were a time to expect U.S.–India relations to improve, many would say it is now. The new Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) government, led by Prime Minister Narendra Modi, has promised to open the economy to more private investment, improve the gross domestic product (GDP) growth rate, create jobs for the rapidly growing youth population, and quicken…

Find more work on Asia
Find more work on Asia