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Asia

The size and dynamism of Asia makes its development a determining factor in protecting and promoting American interests and values. With over half of the global population, the fastest growing economies in the world, freedom and tyranny living side by side, and five treaty alliances of the United States, American leadership in Asia is vital for a free and prosperous region.

HIGHLIGHTS

Our Research & Offerings on Asia
  • Issue Brief posted August 20, 2015 by Lisa Curtis Sri Lankan Poll Results Augur Well for Relations with the U.S.

    Monday’s parliamentary elections in Sri Lanka will bring to power a coalition government headed by Ranil Wickremesinghe’s United National Party (UNP), which is expected to continue democratic reforms and efforts toward ethnic reconciliation that were started six months ago. This is welcome news for the U.S., which has been pressing Colombo to improve the human rights of…

  • Lecture posted August 11, 2015 by James Talent U.S. National Security and Rising China

    The 2014 B. C. Lee Lecture Delivered Monday, December 8, 2014 THE HONORABLE JIM DEMINT: This is a special event at Heritage, the annual B.C. Lee Lecture. The B.C. Lee Lecture is named for the founder of Samsung, a man of real vision for the U.S.–Korean alliance and South Korea’s role in the world. He was a remarkable entrepreneur and leader. I had the pleasure of meeting…

  • Issue Brief posted August 10, 2015 by Olivia Enos A Call to Review Evaluation Methods in the Trafficking in Persons Report

    The 2015 Trafficking in Persons (TIP) report has recently come under fire for upgrading the rankings of Malaysia and Cuba. Speculation about the political motives behind these seemingly unwarranted upgrades has highlighted broader challenges plaguing the Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons, namely the difficulty of defending the objectivity of the…

  • Posted on July 28, 2015 by Chelsea Scism What Is Life Really Like in North Korea? One Woman’s Story

    As a child growing up in North Korea, Hyeonseo Lee believed that her country was the best on the planet. She believed...…

  • Posted on July 24, 2015 by Bruce Klingner Surprise! North Korea Will Keep Its Nukes

    Not that there was any doubt, but North Korea publicly rejected any interest in following Iran into denuclearization...…

  • Issue Brief posted July 24, 2015 by Bruce Klingner U.S. Should Encourage Reconciliation Between Japan and South Korea

    Japanese Prime Minister Shinzō Abe’s forthcoming statement commemorating the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II has the potential to either repair or further impair Tokyo’s current stilted bilateral relations with Seoul. Indeed, a cottage industry has sprouted up predicting what he will say or will not say and the effect his words might have on recent…

  • Testimony posted July 21, 2015 by Walter Lohman The Value of America’s Southeast Asian Alliances

    Testimony before the Subcommittee on Asia and the Pacific Committee on Foreign Affairs United States House of Representatives July 15, 2015 Walter Lohman Director of the Asian Studies Center The Heritage Foundation My name is Walter Lohman. I am director of the Asian Studies Center at The Heritage Foundation. The views I express in this testimony are my own, and should…

  • Posted on July 14, 2015 by Olivia Enos Persecuted Pakistani Christian Woman on Death Row Severely Ill

    Aasia Bibi, a Pakistani Christian woman on death row in Pakistan for alleged blasphemy, is severely ill. Bibi’s lawyers...…

  • Posted on July 11, 2015 by James Carafano Forget Iran: North Korea May Be More Immediate Threat

    While the White House winds up its deal on the future of Iran’s nuclear program, angst abounds in U.S. national security...…

  • Posted on July 6, 2015 by Samantha Reinis #SelfieWithDaughter Campaign Sweeps India

    A hashtag has ignited a social media movement to promote the status of women and influence how many Indian families view...…

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  • Testimony posted February 26, 2009 by Lisa Curtis Building a Strategic Partnership: U.S.-India Relations in the Wake of Mumbai

    Testimony before Foreign Affairs Committee Subcommittee on the Middle East and South Asia United States House of Representatives February 26, 2009 Last year's November 26-29 terrorist attacks in Mumbai that killed nearly 170 people, including six Americans, have provided new impetus to U.S-India counterterrorism cooperation.…

  • Lecture posted April 1, 2013 by Franklin L. Lavin Four Issues Facing China

    It’s a delight to be here. I enjoy coming by and seeing friends, making new friends, and sharing ideas and insight. I have a terrific job—not just the job itself, which is interesting, but the fact that it’s a China-oriented job, and that it allows me, every time I visit China, to learn and to see and to chat with people. It was certainly interesting to do that in a…

  • Backgrounder posted February 22, 2006 by Peter Brookes, Ji Hye Shin China's Influence in Africa: Implications for the United States

    Amid growing concerns about the People's Republic of China's burgeoning influence around the globe, Beijing has now set its sights on Africa. China's interest in Africa is not new. In the 1960s and 1970s, Beijing's interest centered on building ideological solidarity with other underdeveloped nations to advance Chinese-style communism and on repelling Western…

  • Backgrounder posted September 5, 2001 by Dana Robert  Dillon How the Bush Administration Should Handle China

    In August 2001 the United States Navy held a two-carrier passing exercise in the South China Sea. Navy spokesmen denied that the exercise was intended to send a message to China, but it was in the right location to do just that. In fact, Washington needs to do a lot more of the same as a first step toward protecting American interests in the South China…

  • Testimony posted May 20, 2003 by Larry M. Wortzel, Ph.D. North Korea's Connection to International Trade in Drugs, Counterfeiting, and Arms

    Before the Governmental Affairs Subcommittee on Financial Management, Budget, and International Security Mr. Chairman and distinguished members of the Committee, thank you for inviting me to address the North Korean connection to international trade in drugs, counterfeiting, and arms. North Korea's exports from legitimate businesses in 2001 totaled just…

  • Testimony posted March 4, 2004 by John J. Tkacik, Jr. Perspectives on Democracy in Hong Kong

    Prepared Statement by John J. Tkacik, Jr., Research Fellow in China Policy at The Heritage Foundation for the Subcommittee on East Asia and Pacific Affairs of The Senate Foreign Relations Committee Hearing on Perspectives on Democracy in Hong Kong Thursday, March 4, 2004 419 Dirksen Senate Office Building Chairman Brownback and Members of…

  • WebMemo posted June 26, 2008 by John J. Tkacik, Jr. Seismic Suppression: Chinese Censorship After the SichuanEarthquake

    Those who thought that the devastating Sichuan earthquake of May 12 brought out the best in the Chinese government should think again. Six weeks after the quake, it has become obvious that the local government's incompetence and venality was responsible for the collapse of schools while other buildings stood. But now that foreign reporters are covering the deaths…

  • WebMemo posted May 22, 2009 by Bruce Klingner, Derek Scissors, Ph.D. Japan's Economic Weakness: A Security Problem for America

    The Japanese economy shrunk dramatically in the first quarter of 2009, its weakest performance in at least 54 years. Japanese GDP fell at an annualized rate of 15.2 percent, a staggering decline worse than the lowest point of the oil shock of the 1970s or the "lost decade" of the 1990s.[1] Exports have collapsed (at least temporarily), the internal economy remains…

  • Lecture posted August 1, 2001 by The Honorable C. J. Chen The Dignity of Democracy

    John J. Tkacik, Jr.: Good morning, and thank you all for being here. This morning, Ambassador C. J. Chen (Cheng Chien-jen) of the Republic of China will share with us his vision of his country's democratic ideals and the dignity that are due them, not just among Americans but in the broader international community. Diplomacy and protocol are not, after all, the…

  • Issue Brief posted January 12, 2015 by Dean Cheng Why Taiwan Needs Submarines

    In 2001, President George W. Bush’s Administration agreed to a major arms sale to Taiwan. Approved for sale to Taipei were anti-submarine warfare aircraft, anti-ship missiles, self-propelled howitzers, minesweepers, and destroyers. The United States also agreed to help Taiwan obtain new diesel-electric submarines, to modernize the island’s underwater forces. At the time,…

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  • Lecture posted August 11, 2015 by James Talent U.S. National Security and Rising China

    The 2014 B. C. Lee Lecture Delivered Monday, December 8, 2014 THE HONORABLE JIM DEMINT: This is a special event at Heritage, the annual B.C. Lee Lecture. The B.C. Lee Lecture is named for the founder of Samsung, a man of real vision for the U.S.–Korean alliance and South Korea’s role in the world. He was a remarkable entrepreneur and leader. I had the pleasure of meeting…

  • Issue Brief posted January 12, 2015 by Dean Cheng Why Taiwan Needs Submarines

    In 2001, President George W. Bush’s Administration agreed to a major arms sale to Taiwan. Approved for sale to Taipei were anti-submarine warfare aircraft, anti-ship missiles, self-propelled howitzers, minesweepers, and destroyers. The United States also agreed to help Taiwan obtain new diesel-electric submarines, to modernize the island’s underwater forces. At the time,…

  • Special Report posted October 8, 2014 by Walter Lohman, Olivia Enos, John Fleming 2014 Asia Update: What’s at Stake for America

    Introduction Economy Political Security Introduction Often overlooked in the tumult of Washington’s foreign policy debates is the remarkable consistency of U.S. foreign and trade policies over time. This is due to one immutable factor: American national interests. When U.S. policy moves away from our national interest, not only does it cease to…

  • Issue Brief posted September 25, 2014 by Ryan Olson Obama Should Push Modi on Trade Facilitation

    This week President Barack Obama will welcome new Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi to Washington for their first bilateral summit. In Geneva, the Trade Facilitation Preparatory Committee of the World Trade Organization (WTO) will also be meeting. The timing of these two events provides an opportunity to measure India’s commitment to trade freedom and to push Modi to…

  • Issue Brief posted September 24, 2014 by Lisa Curtis Priorities for Prime Minister Modi’s Visit: U.S. and India Must Cooperate for Asian Stability

    Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s visit to the United States next week provides an opportunity to strengthen U.S.–India ties, which stagnated during the second term of Modi’s predecessor, Manmohan Singh. During the visit, President Barack Obama should demonstrate the importance the U.S. attaches to the bilateral relationship and offer cooperation on economic, defense,…

  • Issue Brief posted September 17, 2014 by Bruce Klingner U.S. Should Seek Release of Detainees in North Korea—Without Policy Concessions

    North Korea has sentenced Matthew Miller, a 20-year-old American tourist, to six years of hard labor for attempted espionage. Miller reportedly ripped up his tourist visa and declared he wanted asylum but Pyongyang accused him of intending to “experience prison life so that he could investigate the human rights situation” in North Korea. The regime is also holding Jeffrey…

  • Lecture posted September 15, 2014 by Lisa Curtis An Opportunity to Reenergize U.S.–India Relations

    Lisa Curtis If ever there were a time to expect U.S.–India relations to improve, many would say it is now. The new Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) government, led by Prime Minister Narendra Modi, has promised to open the economy to more private investment, improve the gross domestic product (GDP) growth rate, create jobs for the rapidly growing youth population, and quicken…

  • Special Report posted August 27, 2014 by William T. Wilson, Ph.D. Beating the Middle-Income Trap in Southeast Asia

    About the Author William T. Wilson, PhD, is a senior research fellow in the Asian Studies Center, of the Kathryn and Shelby Cullom Davis Institute for National Security and Foreign Policy, at The Heritage Foundation. In the 14 years of the new millennium, Southeast Asia has had some of the fastest growing economies in the world. Indonesia’s economy has been cruising at…

  • Backgrounder posted December 20, 2013 by Lisa Curtis, Maneeza Hossain Combating Islamism in South Asia: Keeping Bangladesh on the Democratic Path

    Bangladesh has experienced significant political tumult in the past year and there is concern that as the parliamentary election (scheduled for January 5, 2014) approaches, street violence will escalate, jeopardizing the country’s nascent democratic system. While the threat from terrorism had diminished to some extent under the government of Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina,…

  • Backgrounder posted December 20, 2013 by Bruce Klingner The U.S. Should Support Japan’s Enhanced Security Role

    The United States has long urged its allies to assume more responsibility for their defense and for common security threats. Specifically, Washington has asked its allies, in Europe and Asia alike, to increase their defense expenditures, accept new missions, and develop new military capabilities. While some allies have tried to meet Washington’s challenge, Japan’s ability…

Find more work on Asia
Find more work on Asia