Lessons from Rome: Civic Virtue and the Empire’s Decline

Event

July 25, 2017 Lessons from Rome: Civic Virtue and the Empire’s Decline

Serious thinkers of antiquity offer lessons from Rome’s history that illuminate our current political and moral circumstances. 

Today, with the endless expansion of the federal government, America’s cities face a similar situation, with grave consequences to our nation. iStock

Tuesday, July 25, 2017

12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Live Streamed

The Heritage Foundation

Lehrman Auditorium

214 Massachusetts Ave NE
Washington, DC
20002

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Featured Speakers

Hugh Liebert

Ph.D.

Hugh Liebert is Associate Professor of American Politics, Policy and Strategy at the United States Military Academy. He received his Bachelor of Arts degree from Harvard University and his Master of Arts and Ph.D. from the Committee on Social Thought at the University of Chicago. His primary areas of interest are Greek and Roman political thought and American politics. He is the author of Plutarch’s Politics (Cambridge, 2016) and a forthcoming book on Edward Gibbon’s Rome.

Description

Serious thinkers of antiquity offer lessons from Rome’s history that illuminate our current political and moral circumstances. The geographical growth of the Roman Empire brought with it vast administrative centralization which diminished the sovereignty of small cities and localities. Yet, the small city was the place where civic virtues were best formed. In losing their autonomy by being subsumed in the empire, the small cities in which republican virtues flourished were suffocated, which in turn accelerated Rome’s decline. Today, with the endless expansion of the federal government, America’s cities face a similar situation, with grave consequences to our nation. Hugh Liebert will draw on some of antiquity’s greatest thinkers to clarify our situation, shed light on what might await republicanism, and evaluate what can be done today.