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Latin America

Our Research & Offerings on Latin America
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  • Backgrounder on July 18, 1980 "The Cuban Refugee Problem in Perspective, 1959 -1980"

    (Archived document, may contain errors) 124 July 18, 1980 THE CUBAN REFUGEE PROBLEM IN PERSPECTIVE 1959-1980 INTRODUCTION On Tuesday; April 3, 1980, six Cubans crashed through the gate of the Peruvian Embassy in Havana seeking political asylum. During the incident a Cuban policeman guarding the compound was killed and the Castro government removed the…

  • Backgrounder on June 4, 1988 Cuba's Terrorist Connection

    (Archived document, may contain errors) I 655 June 4,1988 CUBAS TERRORIST CONNECTION INTRODUCTION Last Aprils hijacking of a Kuwaiti airliner is a troubling reminder that terrorism remains undefeated. In th e battle against terrorists, attention understandably focuses on such notorious sponsors of terrorism as Iran, Libya, Syria, and radical…

  • America at Risk Memo posted June 1, 2010 by Jim Talent A Constitutional Basis for Defense

    Those who have not done so recently would benefit from studying what the United States Constitution says about the federal government’s responsibility to provide for the common defense. Most Americans had to memorize the preamble to the Constitution when they were children, so they are aware that one of the purposes of the document was to “provide for the common…

  • Backgrounder posted January 20, 2010 by Ray Walser, Ph.D. State Sponsors of Terrorism: Time to Add Venezuela to the List

    Abstract: The U.S. officially designates four countries as state sponsors of terrorism--Iran, Syria, Cuba, and Sudan. It is high time to add Venezuela to the list. Far from being merely a populist showman and bully, Hugo Chávez is a reckless leader who collaborates with Colombian narcoterrorists and Islamist terrorists, pals around with brutal Iranian dictator Mahmoud …

  • Backgrounder on July 19, 1983 The Sandinista War on Human Rights

    (Archived document, may contain errors)277 July 19, 1983 TU SANDINISTA WAR ON HUMAN RIGHTS Four years ago today, the Sandinista revolution toppled the Somoza regime, which had ruled Nicaragua for 43 years. The rebels victory was widely hailed as a triumph over what was seen as one of t he worst violators of human rights in the Americas. Ironic ally--and tragically for the…

  • Backgrounder posted April 26, 2001 by Stephen Johnson Helping Colombia Fix Its Plan to Curb Drug Trafficking, Violence, and Insurgency

    Colombia, America's fourth largest trading partner in Latin America, is the world's largest exporter of cocaine and heroin and a focal point for money laundering and arms trafficking in the Western Hemisphere. Its government has waged a losing battle against insurgents and drug traffickers for over two decades, and drug-related violence is now spilling into…

  • Testimony posted April 21, 2005 by Stephen Johnson North American Youth Gangs: Patterns and Remedies

    Stephen C. Johnson Senior Policy Analyst for Latin America, The Kathryn and Shelby Cullom Davis Institute for International Studies Before the Subcommittee on the Western Hemisphere U.S. House of Representatives Washington, D.C. April 20, 2005 Mr. Chairman and distinguished Members of the Committee, thank you for inviting me…

  • Backgrounder posted June 22, 2011 by Ray Walser, Ph.D., Jena Baker McNeill, Jessica Zuckerman The Human Tragedy of Illegal Immigration: Greater Efforts Needed to Combat Smuggling and Violence

    Abstract: Over the past 10 years, traversing the U.S.–Mexico border illegally has become increasingly dangerous for would-be immigrants. Illegal immigrants face kidnapping, murder, and rape at the hands of violent drug cartels and ever more ruthless human smugglers. Crossing treacherous desert areas exposes the travelers to heat exhaustion and dehydration. Hundreds of…

  • WebMemo posted October 19, 2006 by Stephen Johnson Correa vs. Noboa: Ecuador's Choice Between 'Marx' and Markets

    Radical leftist presidential candidate Rafael Correa was favored in opinion polls going into Ecuador's presidential and legislative elections on October 15. In a surprising result, moderate industrialist Alvaro Noboa garnered 27 percent of the vote to Correa's 23 percent, followed by other challengers with counts in the teens and single digits. Noboa and Correa now…

  • WebMemo posted June 9, 2009 by James M. Roberts, Edwar Enrique Escalante Narco-Terrorism in Peru: The Return of Shining Path

    In the 1960s, leftist philosophy professor Abimael Guzman started a Maoist guerilla group at the University of San Cristobal de Huamanga in Ayacucho, Peru. Guzman named this organization in honor of the most celebrated phrase ever turned by an early Peruvian Communist and journalist, Jose Carlos Mariategui, who wrote that "Marxism-Leninism will open the shining path…

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  • Issue Brief posted May 16, 2014 by James M. Roberts The Pacific Alliance: A Latin American Role Model for the United States

    This Issue Brief is also available in Spanish at Libertad.org. In Latin America and the Caribbean, the old 20th-century debate about whether to engage with the global capitalist system is long over, replaced by a virtual consensus about the importance of trade and international investment. A new cleavage has emerged, however, over how to engage the rising economies of…

  • Issue Brief posted April 23, 2014 by Ana Quintana Crisis in Venezuela: UNASUR and U.S. Foreign Policy

    Earlier this month, Secretary of State John Kerry urged Congress not to respond to the Venezuelan government’s deadly crackdown against the democratic opposition. Recent high-level talks between the Venezuelan government and select members of the opposition have led the Secretary to mistakenly believe that the crisis will soon end. Additionally, he urged Congress to avoid…

  • Issue Brief posted April 9, 2014 by James M. Roberts, Edwar Enrique Escalante Peru: President Humala Should Push for More Economic Freedom

    This Issue Brief is also available in Spanish at Libertad.org When Peruvian president Ollanta Humala took office three years ago, some feared the worst. After all, during his first presidential run in 2006, Humala (a former Peruvian army officer) had donned the fire-breathing mantle of the populist, “Bolivarian” left that was personified by Venezuela’s then-president (and…

  • Issue Brief posted March 4, 2014 by Ana Quintana Venezuela: U.S. Leadership Needed

    For the past few weeks, Venezuela has been rocked by anti-government protests. What started as small-scale demonstrations in the capital city of Caracas has escalated to mobilizations throughout the country. In response, the Venezuelan government has ordered security forces from the national guard to armed motorcycle gangs to brutally crack down on the democratic…

  • Issue Brief posted January 15, 2014 by Ana Quintana, James M. Roberts Latin America and the Caribbean: Congressional Priorities for 2014

    In 2013, the Obama Administration seemed to take for granted U.S. relationships with our many friendly neighbors in Latin America and the Caribbean—nations that share our democratic and economic values—while ignoring growing threats to our national security from some countries in the region that are openly hostile to America’s core principles. In 2014, Congress should…

  • Lecture posted October 15, 2013 by Cristián Larroulet Chile’s Path to Development: Key Reforms to Become the First Developed Country in Latin America

    Finding the best path to lead Chile toward economic development has been a continuous task of Chilean governments and leaders during the last century. The mission of building a society of opportunities—where each person has the chance to reach personal fulfillment, and can live with dignity and without poverty—seems now closer than ever before. After a period of economic…

  • Issue Brief posted August 30, 2013 by Jessica Zuckerman Nicaragua’s Canal Push and Concerns for the U.S.

    President Daniel Ortega of Nicaragua is pushing for a proposed canal project despite lingering questions and growing skepticism from Nicaraguan citizens and politicians. With no public debate, a deficit of hard facts, and a proposal rushed through the Nicaraguan National Assembly, the canal would be a massive undertaking with many unforeseen consequences and still…

  • Issue Brief posted April 15, 2013 by James M. Roberts, Sergio Daga Venezuela: U.S. Should Push President Maduro Toward Economic Freedom

    Hugo Chavez’s hand-picked successor, former trade union boss Nicolás Maduro, appears to have defeated Governor Henrique Capriles by a narrow margin in a contentious and hard-fought special election on April 14. Venezuela is in such shambles after 14 years of seat-of-the-pants mismanagement that Maduro—assuming his victory is confirmed—may ultimately be forced to pursue…

  • Issue Brief posted March 6, 2013 by Ray Walser, Ph.D., Jessica Zuckerman Venezuela After Chavez: U.S. Should Rally to Democracy

    On Tuesday, cancer claimed the life of Venezuela’s President Hugo Chavez, silencing one of Latin America’s most controversial leaders in the 21st century. Chavez’s death opens the way to an uncertain succession process, continued polarization, and potential instability in oil-rich Venezuela. Dealing with a post-Chavez Venezuela will require an ongoing U.S. commitment to…

  • Issue Brief posted January 18, 2013 by James M. Roberts, Ray Walser, Ph.D. The Hagel, Kerry, and Brennan Senate Confirmation Hearings: U.S. Policy for the Western Hemisphere

    The United States Senate will soon begin the confirmation process for three key Administration positions: Senator John Kerry (D–MA) for Secretary of State, former Senator Chuck Hagel (R–NE) for Secretary of Defense, and White House Chief Counterterrorism Advisor John Brennan for Director of the CIA. Each must defend his qualifications for higher office and present a…

Find more work on Latin America
Find more work on Latin America