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United Kingdom

Historically, the “Special Relationship” between the United States and the United Kingdom has been the centerpiece of our efforts to strengthen security and spread liberty around the world. Maintaining the Anglo-American partnership remains critical to U.S. interests, particularly winning the war on terrorism, countering nuclear proliferation by such states as Iran and North Korea, and advancing our common principles and values on the global stage.

HIGHLIGHTS

Our Research & Offerings on United Kingdom
  • Commentary posted April 20, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Election reveals a battle for Britain’s true liberal soul

    The debates between the party leaders have made one thing clear. The election isn’t just a struggle between the Tories, Labour, and the rest. It’s a moment that reveals the state of British liberalism. By liberalism, I don’t mean the nanny-statism that today passes for liberalism, with its identity group politics, its ravenous appetite for state spending in the name of…

  • Issue Brief posted April 8, 2015 by Luke Coffey, Nile Gardiner, Ph.D. The U.S. Should Back the Falkland Islanders’ Right of Self-Determination at the Summit of the Americas

    The Organization of American States (OAS) will hold the seventh Summit of the Americas in Panama City, Panama, on April 10–11, 2015. In the past, Canada has been alone in supporting the Falkland Islanders’ right of self-determination in the OAS. This summit would be a good opportunity for the Obama Administration to drop its support for Argentina’s calls for negotiations…

  • Commentary posted January 20, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. The closing chapter of a not so special relationship?

    The White House announced Prime Minister David Cameron’s two-day visit to Washington in a statement issued last Saturday. It was a tellingly low-key announcement for an Anglo-American relationship that has mostly drifted in the past five years. The alliance, though, does have one big idea up its sleeve. Unfortunately, it’s a bad one. It’s entirely possible that this will…

  • Issue Brief posted January 13, 2015 by Nile Gardiner, Ph.D., Luke Coffey, Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. David Cameron’s Visit to Washington: An Important Opportunity to Renew Anglo–American Leadership

    President Barack Obama will host British Prime Minister David Cameron at the White House on January 15–16. This will be Cameron’s last visit to the United States before the U.K.’s general election on May 7, 2015. Five issues should dominate the visit: (1) Russia’s aggression in Eastern Europe; (2) the crisis in Iran and the Levant; (3) the future of the U.K. inside the…

  • Commentary posted November 21, 2014 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. In Britain, Conservatives Face Defeat in ‘Crisis’ By-Election

    On Thursday, English voters in the constituency of Rochester and Strood, in the country of Kent south-east of London, are likely to return Mark Reckless to Parliament as the UK Independence Party’s (UKIP) second MP. When Conservative Prime Minister David Cameron promised a month ago to throw “everything we can” at the campaign, this wasn’t the result he anticipated. Like…

  • Commentary posted October 6, 2014 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Politics of Floating Voters Dominate the Conferences

    This year, I attended the Conservative Party Conference, which has just concluded in Birmingham. As a historian of British politics, and as an American conservative who believes that the American and British systems are each excellent in their own way, it was not what I expected. One point of comparison is obvious: both the US and Britain have party conventions. In…

  • Commentary posted October 2, 2014 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. In Birmingham, Shut Up and Cheer

    The first thing that strikes an American about the Conservative party’s annual conference — which opened on Sunday in Birmingham, in Britain’s Midlands — is how small it feels. The convention center will supposedly welcome almost 14,000 attendees, but it looked less crowded — and less engaged — than the meeting in the United States of the Conservative Political Action…

  • Backgrounder posted September 26, 2014 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D., Nile Gardiner, Ph.D. Freedom from the EU: Why Britain and the U.S. Should Pursue a U.S.–U.K. Free Trade Area

    The United Kingdom is considering leaving the European Union, and a referendum on British membership is currently scheduled for 2017. The most common argument against a British exit from the EU is that it would be bad for Britain’s economy and, in particular, would damage its ability to negotiate trading arrangements with the rest of the world—a responsibility currently…

  • Commentary posted September 25, 2014 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. The Scottish Referendum: Who Won, Who Lost

    In the end, the vote in Scotland wasn’t particularly close. With 97 percent of the eligible population registered to vote, and an 85 percent turnout, Scotland rejected independence by a decisive margin of just over 2 million votes against (and 1.6 million for). The independence campaign put a serious scare into the supporters of the Union, but they started behind. As…

  • Commentary posted September 24, 2014 by Nile Gardiner, Ph.D. Scotland votes 'No': Good news for Britain and the US

    Today, on Friday, September 19, Great Britain can breathe a huge sigh of relief. The people of Scotland voted Thursday to remain a part of the United Kingdom. This is great news not only for Britain, but also for the United States.   The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is America’s closest ally on the world stage. The Anglo-American "Special…

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  • Backgrounder posted March 4, 2013 by Luke Coffey, Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D., Nile Gardiner, Ph.D. The United States Should Recognize British Sovereignty Over the Falkland Islands

    In 1982, the United Kingdom, led by Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, went to war with Argentina in the South Atlantic to retake the Falkland Islands. Unprovoked, Argentina had invaded the Islands and occupied them for two months. Against the odds, Prime Minister Thatcher assembled a naval task force and deployed it to the South Atlantic to liberate the Islands and their…

  • Issue Brief posted January 13, 2015 by Nile Gardiner, Ph.D., Luke Coffey, Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. David Cameron’s Visit to Washington: An Important Opportunity to Renew Anglo–American Leadership

    President Barack Obama will host British Prime Minister David Cameron at the White House on January 15–16. This will be Cameron’s last visit to the United States before the U.K.’s general election on May 7, 2015. Five issues should dominate the visit: (1) Russia’s aggression in Eastern Europe; (2) the crisis in Iran and the Levant; (3) the future of the U.K. inside the…

  • Backgrounder posted February 13, 2014 by Luke Coffey Self-Determination and National Security: Why the U.S. Should Back British Sovereignty over Gibraltar

    The more than three-centuries-long dispute between Spain and the United Kingdom over the status of Gibraltar has been heating up again. The United States has interests at stake in the dispute. The U.S. benefits from its close relationship with Gibraltar as a British Overseas Territory in a way that would not be possible if Gibraltar was under the control of Spain. The…

  • Special Report posted April 29, 2013 by Robin Harris, D. Phil. Britain and Europe: Where America’s Interests Really Lie

    Introduction The United States has a strong and continuing interest in a prosperous and stable Europe, but the policies and pronouncements of President Barack Obama and the U.S. Department of State are making that goal less, not more, attainable. This is especially true as regards current, very public U.S. pressure on Britain to stay inside the European Union, apparently…

  • Special Report posted June 6, 2011 by Robin Harris, D. Phil. Problems in British Foreign Policy

    Abstract It may take years before the results of NATO’s military operations against Colonel Muammar Qadhafi’s Libyan regime can finally be judged, but the issues raised by the crisis are of immediate importance. First, the way in which the operation has been conducted is a reminder of the importance to the United States of its European allies. The…

  • Lecture posted July 2, 2013 by Jim DeMint Britain and the U.S.: Two Peoples United by an Attachment to Self-Determination

    I would like to thank the Henry Jackson Society, not just for this event today, but for the very important work you do on transatlantic relations and security concerns. You stand up for freedom around the world, and I salute you for that. I would like to say one word about the man after whom you’re named. Scoop Jackson was the kind of Democrat I wish we had more of today.…

  • WebMemo posted October 26, 2010 by Nile Gardiner, Ph.D., Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D., J.D. Foster, Ph.D. The U.K. Budget Cuts: Lessons for the United States

    British Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne unveiled a series of major austerity cuts on October 20 aimed at eliminating Britain’s structural budget deficit by 2015, which currently stands at 11.4 percent of GDP.[1] The Conservative-led coalition government in London plans to cut a total of £81 billion ($130 billion) from public spending over the next four years,…

  • Backgrounder posted November 18, 2008 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. British Defense Cuts Threaten the Anglo-American Special Relationship

    Great Britain is a founding member of NATO. It is currently fighting wars in both Iraq and Afghanistan, but is spending less of its gross domestic product (GDP) on its armed forces than at any point since the Great Depression. A failure of political leadership in Britain has allowed defense issues, and the standing of its Ministry of Defense (MoD), to slide to…

  • Lecture posted January 3, 2011 by The Honorable John Howard The Anglosphere and the Advance of Freedom

    Abstract: The ties that bind the U.S., Great Britain, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and in different ways other nations that share some of the values of the Anglosphere are deeper and more abiding, says former Australian Prime Minister John Howard, than the bonds between any other countries with which his country has been associated. The English-speaking nations have…

  • Special Report posted February 22, 2012 by Robin Harris, D. Phil. The U.K. Governing Coalition: The Challenges Ahead and Why America Has a Stake in Britain’s Success

    Abstract: In May 2010, the U.K. general election resulted in a hung Parliament from which emerged a Conservative–Liberal Democrat coalition with Conservative leader David Cameron as Prime Minister. The experiment was widely justified by the evident need to cope with the economic crisis and, in particular, the unsustainable budget deficit inherited from the outgoing Labour…

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Find more work on United Kingdom
Find more work on United Kingdom