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Europe

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  • Backgrounder posted February 18, 2014 by Michaela Dodge U.S. Nuclear Weapons in Europe: Critical for Transatlantic Security

    Since the end of the Cold War, the U.S. nuclear weapons posture has undergone a dramatic change. The U.S. has withdrawn about 90 percent of its forward-deployed nuclear weapons from Europe. In 2012, the Obama Administration initiated the Life Extension Program (LEP) for the B61 tactical nuclear weapon, which is the last nuclear weapon the U.S. keeps in Europe and the only…

  • Backgrounder posted February 13, 2014 by Luke Coffey Self-Determination and National Security: Why the U.S. Should Back British Sovereignty over Gibraltar

    The more than three-centuries-long dispute between Spain and the United Kingdom over the status of Gibraltar has been heating up again. The United States has interests at stake in the dispute. The U.S. benefits from its close relationship with Gibraltar as a British Overseas Territory in a way that would not be possible if Gibraltar was under the control of Spain. The…

  • Commentary posted July 6, 2007 by Nile Gardiner, Ph.D., Sally McNamara Wrong Way Warsi

    British conservatives send the wrong message in the war on terror. The appointment by the Conservative party of Sayeeda Warsi as shadow minister for Community Cohesion sends the wrong signal at a time when Britain is fighting a global war against Islamic terrorism and extremism, both domestically and internationally. Mrs. Warsi has been a fierce critic of British…

  • Commentary posted December 19, 2013 by Daniel Kochis The Future Will Be Much Brighter If NATO and the U.S. Face It Together

    Since the signing of the North Atlantic Treaty in 1949, the trans-Atlantic community of free nations has formed the bedrock of world security. Almost sixty five years later, NATO is and will remain the irreplaceable vehicle by which the nation states that comprise the alliance will remain protected from external aggression, best able to cope with a new pandemic of threats…

  • Commentary posted June 16, 2005 by Ariel Cohen, Ph.D. Gitmo is No Gulag

    Perhaps she was blinded by a hatred of U.S. policies. Maybe she was seeking to shift attention from terrorist crimes. But one thing's certain: When Amnesty International's Secretary General Irene Zubeida Khan called the Guantanamo Bay detention facility the "Gulag of our times" (reportedly adding, "Ironic that this should happen as we mark the 60th anniversary of the…

  • Backgrounder posted February 7, 1996 by John Hillen Getting NATO Back to Basics

    Introduction Ever since the Cold War ended, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization has been in the midst of an identity crisis. When it lost the Soviet threat in the early 1990s, the Atlantic alliance went on a search to redefine itself. There have been many stops on this inchoate journey of redefinition. The Bush Administration used NATO forces, structure, and…

  • Issue Brief posted January 14, 2015 by Luke Coffey, Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D., Nile Gardiner, Ph.D. Top Five Policy Priorities for Europe in 2015

    The United States faces mounting challenges in Europe in 2015. Russia is on the march in Ukraine, many of America’s oldest allies question its commitment to transatlantic security, and the economies of Europe have still not fully recovered from the Euro crisis. In addition, the specter of Islamist terrorism has raised its ugly head again in Europe, with the brutal slaying…

  • Commentary posted March 9, 2009 by Nile Gardiner, Ph.D. Barack Obama Must Grow as a Statesman if He is to Lead the Free World

    One thing's certain when President Obama arrives in London at the end of March - he'll receive a far warmer and more cordial welcome than the one he doled out to Gordon Brown in Washington earlier this week. As the British media widely noted, the Prime Minister was given a humiliatingly low key reception at the White House at the hands of a new U.S. Administration…

  • Commentary posted May 8, 2008 by Helle C. Dale London drama

    You can call him Red Ken -- or the canary in the coalmine of British Labor politics. On Friday, that canary took a nosedive from its perch, when the citizens of London voted out Ken Livingstone as mayor of London after eight years in office. His part of the worst local election showing for the Labor Party in 40 years. It reflects just how fast and how far the party's…

  • Commentary posted April 5, 2005 by Peter Brookes Hugo Chavez: Castro's Mini-Me

    'One darned thing after another': That's how former Secretary of State Dean Acheson once defined foreign policy. The latest "darned thing" for the United States is Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez. For no apparent reason, the leftist strongman is arming Venezuela to the teeth. He's also supporting local narcoterrorists and other Latin…

Find more work on Europe
Find more work on Europe
Find more work on Europe