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China

China’s economic, military, and diplomatic capabilities are growing quickly, helping it to emerge as a possible peer competitor to the United States in the Asia-Pacific. China’s economic opportunities offer areas for cooperation and discussion, yet its political and military ambitions still create uncertainty amongst its neighbors and the United States.

HIGHLIGHTS

Our Research & Offerings on China
  • Testimony posted September 27, 2016 by Dean Cheng China and Asian Maritime Security

    Testimony before the Subcommittee on Asia and the Pacific Committee on Foreign Affairs U.S. House of Representatives September 22, 2016 Chairman Salmon, Ranking Member Sherman, and Members of the Subommittee. Thank you for the opportunity to testify to you this morning. My name is Dean Cheng, and I am a Senior Research Fellow in the Asian Studies Center of the Kathryn…

  • Testimony posted September 27, 2016 by Dean Cheng U.S.-China Competition in Space

    Testimony before Subcommittee on Space Committee on Science, Space, and Technology U.S. House of Representatives September 27, 2016 Subcommittee Chairman Babin, Ranking Member Edwards, and Members of the House Subcommittee on Space. My name is Dean Cheng, and I am the Senior Research Fellow for Chinese political and security affairs with The Heritage Foundation. The…

  • Backgrounder posted September 15, 2016 by Michaela Dodge President Obama’s Missile Defense Policy: A Misguided Legacy

    As a candidate, Barack Obama called ballistic missile defense programs “unproven” and vowed to cut them.[1] As President, Barack Obama eventually had to appreciate the value that missile defense brings to the U.S. strategic posture and allied relationships. The Obama Administration initially cancelled some of the most important missile defense programs that were started…

  • Backgrounder posted September 12, 2016 by Tori K. Whiting The U.S. Steel Market Needs Free Trade, Not Favoritism

    Since 2012, the global economy has been experiencing average growth rates of less than 3 percent. As a result, demand for steel has weakened. Despite the procyclical nature of the global steel market, some nations, most notably China, are producing large amounts of steel, thereby driving down the price. In response to alleged unfair trade practices, domestic steel…

  • Backgrounder posted August 11, 2016 by Bruce Klingner Chinese Foot-dragging on North Korea Thwarts U.S. Security Interests

    North Korea’s fourth nuclear test, held in January 2016, paradoxically triggered a stronger international response than any of its first three. Although this latest test was not significantly larger than its previous ones, it did result in an international consensus that stronger, more comprehensive sanctions must be imposed on North Korea for its serial violations of its…

  • Commentary posted July 20, 2016 by Dean Cheng South China Sea After the Tribunal Ruling: Where Do We Go From Here?

    On July 12, the Permanent Court of Arbitration (PCA) at The Hague handed down perhaps the most long awaited finding in its history. After nearly four years of deliberation, the Court ruled on several South China Sea issues, based on a case filed by the Philippines against the People’s Republic of China (PRC). On issue after issue, the Court came down overwhelmingly in…

  • Testimony posted July 18, 2016 by William T. Wilson, Ph.D. Evaluating the Financial Risks in China

    Testimony before the Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs U.S. Senate July 14, 2016 My name is William Wilson. I am a Senior Research Fellow at The Heritage Foundation. The views I express in this testimony are my own and should not be construed as representing any official position of The Heritage Foundation. Overview Despite its size, direct global…

  • Posted on July 14, 2016 by Steven Groves How the US Must Respond to China’s Rejection of South China Sea Court Decision

    An arbitration court accepted claims made by the Philippines against China in the South China Sea, however, China’s...…

  • Lecture posted July 7, 2016 by Franklin L. Lavin Thinking Seriously About China

    Thank you to Ed Feulner for the kind introduction, and let me also thank The Heritage Foundation for hosting me today. I have had the privilege of serving on the Advisory Council of Heritage’s Asian Studies Center for a number of years, and I am grateful for the good work it does. We are here today to discuss U.S.–China relations, and the title of my speech was selected…

  • Issue Brief posted June 17, 2016 by Michaela Dodge, John Venable Why the United States Needs an LRSO Capability

    The debate over the Long-Range Stand-Off (LRSO) weapon continues to heat up both in Congress and within the nuclear weapons community. The LRSO is an essential component of a credible future U.S. nuclear and conventional deterrent force. Having it in the nation’s arsenal will increase the security of the United States and that of its allies. The Air-Launched Cruise…

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  • Commentary posted February 2, 2010 by Lee Edwards, Ph.D. The Legacy of Mao Zedong is Mass Murder

    Can you name the greatest mass murderer of the 20th century? No, it wasn’t Hitler or Stalin. It was Mao Zedong. According to the authoritative “Black Book of Communism,” an estimated 65 million Chinese died as a result of Mao’s repeated, merciless attempts to create a new “socialist” China. Anyone who got in his way was done away with -- by execution, imprisonment…

  • Backgrounder posted February 26, 2015 by Lisa Curtis, Olivia Enos Combating Human Trafficking in Asia Requires U.S. Leadership

    Despite increased U.S. foreign policy attention over the past decade, human trafficking remains widespread and deeply entrenched in many Asian countries. The precise number of people being trafficked is difficult to estimate, but new studies suggest nearly 36 million victims worldwide. Of those 36 million, nearly two-thirds are from Asia.[1] Total profits from worldwide…

  • Issue Brief posted January 12, 2015 by Dean Cheng Why Taiwan Needs Submarines

    In 2001, President George W. Bush’s Administration agreed to a major arms sale to Taiwan. Approved for sale to Taipei were anti-submarine warfare aircraft, anti-ship missiles, self-propelled howitzers, minesweepers, and destroyers. The United States also agreed to help Taiwan obtain new diesel-electric submarines, to modernize the island’s underwater forces. At the time,…

  • Issue Brief posted April 28, 2015 by Dean Cheng America Needs a Comprehensive Strategy for Countering China’s Expanding Perimeter of National Interests

    What do Central Asia, the South China Sea, the Internet, and outer space have in common? All of these are parts of China’s expanding perimeter of national interest. Over the past decade, the People’s Republic of China (PRC) has demonstrated a willingness to use its increasing economic influence to pressure neighboring countries in physical geographic disputes and to…

  • Commentary posted April 17, 2011 by Derek Scissors, Ph.D. No Crisis in Rare Earths

    If you're not familiar with rare earth elements, they are metals valuable in energy generation and advanced military equipment. Some are genuinely rare, others less so. Nearly all are currently being produced in the People's Republic of China (PRC). Some commentators mix the value of rare earths and the location of their production and discover a crisis that demands…

  • Commentary posted April 14, 2015 by Peter Brookes China sets out to claim high seas

    Check this: In a brazen move, the People’s Republic of China is now building “islands” in the South China Sea to bolster its position against several other East Asian countries — and the United States. Yes, I said “building.” China is actually dredging sand and piling it up on existing reefs to create new islands that, according to Beijing, will have both civilian and —…

  • Backgrounder posted April 26, 2002 by John J. Tkacik, Jr. Stating America's Case to China's Hu Jintao: A Primer on U.S.-China-Taiwan Policy

    As Washington prepares for the April 29 arrival of China's heir apparent, Vice President Hu Jintao, the depth of misinformation that beclouds relations with China should encourage policymakers to refresh their understandings of basic documents and principles that guide U.S. policy toward Taiwan so that no statements can be taken out of context or assigned a broader…

  • Commentary posted May 15, 2012 by Jennifer A. Marshall Horror Behind Dissent in China

    It has all the makings of a spellbinding screenplay: A blind Chinese dissident outwits a communist regime's thugs to escape house arrest and seek sanctuary in the U.S. Embassy in Beijing. Chen Guangcheng scaled walls, crossed fields, slept in a pig pen, injured a foot, and -- after 17 hours -- connected with an activist he'd never met who drove him toward the…

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  • Testimony posted September 27, 2016 by Dean Cheng China and Asian Maritime Security

    Testimony before the Subcommittee on Asia and the Pacific Committee on Foreign Affairs U.S. House of Representatives September 22, 2016 Chairman Salmon, Ranking Member Sherman, and Members of the Subommittee. Thank you for the opportunity to testify to you this morning. My name is Dean Cheng, and I am a Senior Research Fellow in the Asian Studies Center of the Kathryn…

  • Testimony posted September 27, 2016 by Dean Cheng U.S.-China Competition in Space

    Testimony before Subcommittee on Space Committee on Science, Space, and Technology U.S. House of Representatives September 27, 2016 Subcommittee Chairman Babin, Ranking Member Edwards, and Members of the House Subcommittee on Space. My name is Dean Cheng, and I am the Senior Research Fellow for Chinese political and security affairs with The Heritage Foundation. The…

  • Backgrounder posted September 15, 2016 by Michaela Dodge President Obama’s Missile Defense Policy: A Misguided Legacy

    As a candidate, Barack Obama called ballistic missile defense programs “unproven” and vowed to cut them.[1] As President, Barack Obama eventually had to appreciate the value that missile defense brings to the U.S. strategic posture and allied relationships. The Obama Administration initially cancelled some of the most important missile defense programs that were started…

  • Backgrounder posted August 11, 2016 by Bruce Klingner Chinese Foot-dragging on North Korea Thwarts U.S. Security Interests

    North Korea’s fourth nuclear test, held in January 2016, paradoxically triggered a stronger international response than any of its first three. Although this latest test was not significantly larger than its previous ones, it did result in an international consensus that stronger, more comprehensive sanctions must be imposed on North Korea for its serial violations of its…

  • Testimony posted July 18, 2016 by William T. Wilson, Ph.D. Evaluating the Financial Risks in China

    Testimony before the Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs U.S. Senate July 14, 2016 My name is William Wilson. I am a Senior Research Fellow at The Heritage Foundation. The views I express in this testimony are my own and should not be construed as representing any official position of The Heritage Foundation. Overview Despite its size, direct global…

  • Lecture posted July 7, 2016 by Franklin L. Lavin Thinking Seriously About China

    Thank you to Ed Feulner for the kind introduction, and let me also thank The Heritage Foundation for hosting me today. I have had the privilege of serving on the Advisory Council of Heritage’s Asian Studies Center for a number of years, and I am grateful for the good work it does. We are here today to discuss U.S.–China relations, and the title of my speech was selected…

  • Backgrounder posted May 5, 2016 by William T. Wilson, Ph.D. The Prospects for Economic Transition in China Are Questionable

    During the financial and economic crisis of 2008 and 2009, Beijing passed a $600 billion stimulus package (representing 13.4 percent of Chinese gross domestic product (GDP)) which allowed China to breeze through the worst global contraction since the Great Depression. With the U.S. mired in depression-like conditions, some believed that the “Beijing Consensus” of…

  • Lecture posted January 21, 2016 by Dean Cheng Prospects for Extended Deterrence in Space and Cyber: The Case of the PRC

    While there has been discussion about whether today’s security environment constitutes a “neo-Cold War,” the reality is that it is actually more complex than the Cold War. For most of the period between 1947 and 1992, the situation was largely marked by a bipolar balance, where the two major players created somewhat symmetrical blocs of allies, friends, and client states.…

  • Issue Brief posted January 15, 2016 by Joshua Meservey Four U.S. Policy Priorities for Africa in 2016

    There were some positive developments for U.S. interests in Africa in 2015. Nigeria, the continent’s most populous nation and boasting its largest economy, peacefully elected a new president. Congress reaffirmed the U.S.’s commitment to Tunisia, a fledgling democratic ally in the crosshairs of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS). The African Growth and Opportunity…

  • Special Report posted December 31, 2015 by Walter Lohman, John Fleming, Olivia Enos 2015 Asia Update: The Trends and What They Mean for America

    The Asian Studies Center America's Commitment to the Pacific Previous editions of this product have illustrated America’s resident power status in Asia and the continuing, critical importance of its commitment to leadership there. They have sought to demonstrate in graphic fashion what is at stake for the U.S. from the economy to security to human liberty. This year’s…

Find more work on China
Find more work on China