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Sudan

Our Research & Offerings on Sudan
  • Issue Brief posted January 22, 2014 by Charlotte Florance, Brett D. Schaefer The United States Should Be More Assertive in South Sudan

    South Sudan, the world’s youngest nation, is embroiled in a conflict that began as a political dispute but has been intensified by pre-existing ethnic tensions. The number of casualties and refugees is straining government and international humanitarian efforts. If the situation deteriorates further, investments made by the U.S. and the international community will be…

  • Issue Brief posted September 5, 2012 by Brett D. Schaefer The U.N. Human Rights Council Does Not Deserve U.S. Support

    The African Union’s decision to nominate Sudan for the United Nations Human Rights Council (HRC) elicited justifiable outrage. Pressure from human rights groups and governments led Kenya to announce its own election bid, causing Sudan to withdraw. This was a welcome development; the notion of the genocidal government sitting on the most visible U.N. human rights body was…

  • Issue Brief posted August 3, 2012 by Morgan Lorraine Roach Sudan and South Sudan: Failed Talks Require New Strategy

    Today, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton travels to South Sudan as part of her two-week tour of Africa. During her visit she will meet with South Sudanese President Salva Kiir and discuss the country’s ongoing crisis with Sudan. Clinton’s visit takes place a day after the two countries failed to meet the deadline imposed by the United Nations Security Council Resolution…

  • Issue Brief posted July 31, 2012 by Morgan Lorraine Roach, Brett D. Schaefer How the New African Union Leadership Should Improve the Organization

    For the African Union (AU) Commission, the election earlier this month of South Africa’s Home Affairs minister, Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma, as chair offers a chance to address issues that have hindered the organization’s image and its impact on the continent. The new leader should provide leadership in pressing the organization to respond more effectively to the…

  • Issue Brief posted April 23, 2012 by Morgan Lorraine Roach Lord’s Resistance Army: A Symptom of Central Africa’s Larger Problems

    The Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) has caused enormous suffering and instability in central Africa, launching violent attacks in Uganda, the Central African Republic (CAR), the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), and newly independent South Sudan. While Congress and the Obama Administration have provided substantial political, financial, and military support aimed at…

  • Lecture posted April 21, 2011 by The Honorable Richard Williamson Referendum in Southern Sudan and the Road to Independence

    Abstract: Despite the comprehensive peace agreement on Sudan signed on January 9, 2005, several key issues have not been resolved: important political and economic issues, principally the future of Abyei; five contested border areas that were identified in 2005; citizenship; debt relief; and the underlying issue of oil-revenue sharing. Close to 70 percent of Sudan’s oil…

  • WebMemo posted March 16, 2011 by Morgan Lorraine Roach, Ray Walser, Ph.D. The Role of the United States in Southern Sudan’s Referendum

    On January 9, southern Sudanese voted for their independence from the government in Khartoum. In the days leading up to the referendum, the international community feared delay, bloodshed, or the complete breakdown of the peace process. Few expected the referendum to take place on time and as peacefully as it did. While Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir has…

  • PODCAST: Rob Bluey and Tina Korbe on the Budget, and Ambassador Richard Williamson on Sudan Audio Recorded on February 28, 2011 PODCAST: Rob Bluey and Tina Korbe on the Budget, and Ambassador Richard Williamson on Sudan

    In a Heritage in Focus podcast special, Rob Bluey and Tina Korbe discuss the president's budget, and special guest Ambassador Richard Williamson discusses the partition vote in Sudan. David Weinberger hosts. To get regular updates on Heritage in Focus podcasts, visit our RSS feed or subscribe on iTunes. To listen to more Heritage in Focus podcasts, return to the Podcast…

  • Backgrounder posted January 15, 2010 by James Phillips An Israeli Preventive Attack on Iran's Nuclear Sites: Implications for the U.S.

    Abstract: Iran's nuclear weapons ambitions are ominous in light of its hostile foreign policy and longstanding sup­port for terrorism. But Iran's repeated threats to annihilate the state of Israel while it develops the world's most dan­gerous weapons have created an even more explosive situ­ation. If diplomatic efforts to defuse the situation fail, Israel may see no other…

  • Play Movie Brett Schaefer on Fox New 8/5/09 Video Recorded on August 5, 2009 Brett Schaefer on Fox New 8/5/09

    Brett Schaefer discussing the trial of a Sudanese woman who faces 40 lashes for wearing pants.…

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  • Issue Brief posted August 3, 2012 by Morgan Lorraine Roach Sudan and South Sudan: Failed Talks Require New Strategy

    Today, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton travels to South Sudan as part of her two-week tour of Africa. During her visit she will meet with South Sudanese President Salva Kiir and discuss the country’s ongoing crisis with Sudan. Clinton’s visit takes place a day after the two countries failed to meet the deadline imposed by the United Nations Security Council Resolution…

  • Backgrounder posted January 15, 2010 by James Phillips An Israeli Preventive Attack on Iran's Nuclear Sites: Implications for the U.S.

    Abstract: Iran's nuclear weapons ambitions are ominous in light of its hostile foreign policy and longstanding sup­port for terrorism. But Iran's repeated threats to annihilate the state of Israel while it develops the world's most dan­gerous weapons have created an even more explosive situ­ation. If diplomatic efforts to defuse the situation fail, Israel may see no other…

  • Issue Brief posted January 22, 2014 by Charlotte Florance, Brett D. Schaefer The United States Should Be More Assertive in South Sudan

    South Sudan, the world’s youngest nation, is embroiled in a conflict that began as a political dispute but has been intensified by pre-existing ethnic tensions. The number of casualties and refugees is straining government and international humanitarian efforts. If the situation deteriorates further, investments made by the U.S. and the international community will be…

  • Issue Brief posted September 5, 2012 by Brett D. Schaefer The U.N. Human Rights Council Does Not Deserve U.S. Support

    The African Union’s decision to nominate Sudan for the United Nations Human Rights Council (HRC) elicited justifiable outrage. Pressure from human rights groups and governments led Kenya to announce its own election bid, causing Sudan to withdraw. This was a welcome development; the notion of the genocidal government sitting on the most visible U.N. human rights body was…

  • Issue Brief posted April 23, 2012 by Morgan Lorraine Roach Lord’s Resistance Army: A Symptom of Central Africa’s Larger Problems

    The Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) has caused enormous suffering and instability in central Africa, launching violent attacks in Uganda, the Central African Republic (CAR), the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), and newly independent South Sudan. While Congress and the Obama Administration have provided substantial political, financial, and military support aimed at…

  • WebMemo posted March 5, 2009 by Derek Scissors, Ph.D. China Will Follow the U.S.: A Climate Change Fable

    President Obama's emphasis on climate change has notable implications for U.S.-China relations. On her inaugural trip to Asia, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton sought to expand the Sino-American Strategic Economic Dialog to include climate change among America's chief China policy priorities.[1] Making climate change a high priority is a mistake. It…

  • WebMemo posted May 18, 2006 by Brett D. Schaefer Keeping the Pressure on Sudan

    In recent years violence and atrocities committed by "Arab" militias in the Darfur region of western Sudan have increased. The large numbers of deaths and displaced persons, as well as the ethnic component of the conflict, have led many to compare the situation to the genocide in Rwanda. Many have blamed the U.S. for failing to act more decisively to stop the crisis…

  • WebMemo posted February 5, 2009 by Brett D. Schaefer The Demise of the U.N. Procurement Task Force Threatens Oversight at the U.N.

    The United Nations has a well-earned reputation for mismanagement and vulnerability to corruption and fraud. In the past few years alone, the U.N. has been embroiled in numerous scandals, including: The Iraqi Oil-for-Food scandal that Saddam Hussein used to generate over $10 billion in illegal revenue, according to the U.S. Government Accountability…

  • WebMemo posted March 16, 2011 by Morgan Lorraine Roach, Ray Walser, Ph.D. The Role of the United States in Southern Sudan’s Referendum

    On January 9, southern Sudanese voted for their independence from the government in Khartoum. In the days leading up to the referendum, the international community feared delay, bloodshed, or the complete breakdown of the peace process. Few expected the referendum to take place on time and as peacefully as it did. While Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir has…

  • WebMemo posted March 8, 2007 by John J. Tkacik, Jr. A Chinese Military Superpower?

    Members of Congress are considering several bills designed to combat climate change. Chief among them is Senate bill 2191--America's Cli­mate Security Act of 2007--spearheaded by Joseph Lieberman (I-CT) and John Warner (R-VA). This bill would set a limit on the emissions of green­house gases, mainly carbon dioxide from the com­bustion of coal, oil, and natural…

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  • Issue Brief posted January 22, 2014 by Charlotte Florance, Brett D. Schaefer The United States Should Be More Assertive in South Sudan

    South Sudan, the world’s youngest nation, is embroiled in a conflict that began as a political dispute but has been intensified by pre-existing ethnic tensions. The number of casualties and refugees is straining government and international humanitarian efforts. If the situation deteriorates further, investments made by the U.S. and the international community will be…

  • Issue Brief posted September 5, 2012 by Brett D. Schaefer The U.N. Human Rights Council Does Not Deserve U.S. Support

    The African Union’s decision to nominate Sudan for the United Nations Human Rights Council (HRC) elicited justifiable outrage. Pressure from human rights groups and governments led Kenya to announce its own election bid, causing Sudan to withdraw. This was a welcome development; the notion of the genocidal government sitting on the most visible U.N. human rights body was…

  • Issue Brief posted August 3, 2012 by Morgan Lorraine Roach Sudan and South Sudan: Failed Talks Require New Strategy

    Today, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton travels to South Sudan as part of her two-week tour of Africa. During her visit she will meet with South Sudanese President Salva Kiir and discuss the country’s ongoing crisis with Sudan. Clinton’s visit takes place a day after the two countries failed to meet the deadline imposed by the United Nations Security Council Resolution…

  • Issue Brief posted July 31, 2012 by Morgan Lorraine Roach, Brett D. Schaefer How the New African Union Leadership Should Improve the Organization

    For the African Union (AU) Commission, the election earlier this month of South Africa’s Home Affairs minister, Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma, as chair offers a chance to address issues that have hindered the organization’s image and its impact on the continent. The new leader should provide leadership in pressing the organization to respond more effectively to the…

  • Issue Brief posted April 23, 2012 by Morgan Lorraine Roach Lord’s Resistance Army: A Symptom of Central Africa’s Larger Problems

    The Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) has caused enormous suffering and instability in central Africa, launching violent attacks in Uganda, the Central African Republic (CAR), the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), and newly independent South Sudan. While Congress and the Obama Administration have provided substantial political, financial, and military support aimed at…

  • WebMemo posted March 16, 2011 by Morgan Lorraine Roach, Ray Walser, Ph.D. The Role of the United States in Southern Sudan’s Referendum

    On January 9, southern Sudanese voted for their independence from the government in Khartoum. In the days leading up to the referendum, the international community feared delay, bloodshed, or the complete breakdown of the peace process. Few expected the referendum to take place on time and as peacefully as it did. While Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir has…

  • Backgrounder posted January 15, 2010 by James Phillips An Israeli Preventive Attack on Iran's Nuclear Sites: Implications for the U.S.

    Abstract: Iran's nuclear weapons ambitions are ominous in light of its hostile foreign policy and longstanding sup­port for terrorism. But Iran's repeated threats to annihilate the state of Israel while it develops the world's most dan­gerous weapons have created an even more explosive situ­ation. If diplomatic efforts to defuse the situation fail, Israel may see no other…

  • Backgrounder posted June 10, 2009 by Brett D. Schaefer, Steven Groves Durban II: Lessons for U.S. Engagement with the U.N. on Human Rights

    The 2009 Durban Review Conference (commonly referred to as Durban II) was the follow-up to the 2001 United Nations World Conference Against Racism, Racial Discrimination, Xenophobia and Related Intolerance held in Durban, South Africa. The 2001 conference was hijacked by nations and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) that used it as a platform to criticize…

  • WebMemo posted April 6, 2009 by Ariel Cohen, Ph.D., Owen Graham Obama in Ankara: Turkey's Dangerous Drift

    After attending the three summits--G-20, NATO, and the EU--President Obama arrived in Ankara, Turkey, Sunday for the final stop on his inaugural European tour. Obama's visit to Turkey highlights the importance Washington attaches to this country as a key regional player, a veteran NATO ally, and an influential state with a predominately Muslim population. During…

  • WebMemo posted March 5, 2009 by Derek Scissors, Ph.D. China Will Follow the U.S.: A Climate Change Fable

    President Obama's emphasis on climate change has notable implications for U.S.-China relations. On her inaugural trip to Asia, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton sought to expand the Sino-American Strategic Economic Dialog to include climate change among America's chief China policy priorities.[1] Making climate change a high priority is a mistake. It…

Find more work on Sudan
Find more work on Sudan