2018 Index of Economic Freedom

Moldova

overall score58.4
world rank105
Rule of Law

Property Rights53.5

Government Integrity26.6

Judicial Effectiveness26.3

Government Size

Government Spending56.7

Tax Burden85.3

Fiscal Health90.0

Regulatory Efficiency

Business Freedom66.0

Labor Freedom39.9

Monetary Freedom73.2

Open Markets

Trade Freedom78.3

Investment Freedom55.0

Financial Freedom50.0

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Quick Facts
  • Population:
    • 3.6 million
  • GDP (PPP):
    • $18.9 billion
    • -1.1% growth
    • 3.4% 5-year compound annual growth
    • $5,328 per capita
  • Unemployment:
    • 5.0%
  • Inflation (CPI):
    • 6.4%
  • FDI Inflow:
    • $143.2 million
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Moldova’s economic freedom score is 58.4, making its economy the 105th freest in the 2018 Index. Its overall score has increased by 0.4 point, with improvements in property rights and judicial effectiveness outweighing declines in government integrity and trade freedom. Moldova is ranked 40th among 44 countries in the Europe region, and its overall score is below the regional and world averages.

With a moderate climate and productive farmland, Moldova’s economy in theory should be more prosperous. The domestic political impasse caused partly by Russia undercuts structural reform and realization of the country’s potential. The government has tried to address weaknesses in the financial sector, but growth is hampered by endemic corruption and a Russian ban on imports of Moldova’s agricultural products. The economy remains vulnerable to weak administrative capacity, vested bureaucratic interests, higher fuel prices, Russian political and economic pressure, and unresolved separatism in the Transnistria region.

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Background

Moldova was forced into the Soviet Union after World War II and faces a secessionist pro-Russian movement in its Transnistria region, where more than 1,100 Russian troops are encamped. Excessive economic dependence on Russia further threatens its sovereignty. In 2014, a pro–European integration coalition of the center-right Liberal Democratic Party, the Liberal Party, and the center-left Democratic Party of current Prime Minister Pavel Filip blocked efforts by the pro-Russia Party of Socialists of the Republic of Moldova (PSRM) to form a government. In 2016, the PSRM’s Igor Dodan narrowly won the first direct presidential election since 1996. Moldova remains one of Europe’s poorest countries. Its economy depends on emigrants’ remittances and agriculture, especially fruits, vegetables, wine, and tobacco.

Rule of LawView Methodology

Property Rights 53.5 Create a Graph using this measurement

Government Integrity 26.6 Create a Graph using this measurement

Judicial Effectiveness 26.3 Create a Graph using this measurement

A system for recording property titles and mortgages is in place, and Moldova has laws to protect all property rights. The judicial sector remains weak and does not always fully guarantee the rights of citizens and foreign investors. Transparency International has urged withdrawal of pending legislation that would grant impunity to corrupt officials, civil servants, and businesses that declare illicitly acquired assets.

Government SizeView Methodology

The top personal income tax rate is 18 percent, and the top corporate tax rate is 12 percent. Other taxes include a value-added tax. The overall tax burden equals 31.6 percent of total domestic income. Over the past three years, government spending has amounted to 38.0 percent of total output (GDP), and budget deficits have averaged 2.1 percent of GDP. Public debt is equivalent to 38.1 percent of GDP.

Regulatory EfficiencyView Methodology

In 2016, Moldova made starting a business more expensive by increasing the cost of company registration. Getting electricity was made easier for small businesses, but several tax rates that businesses pay were raised. Labor regulations are rigid. The nonsalary cost of employing a worker is high. The government has resisted pressure from the International Monetary Fund to reduce agricultural subsidies.

Open MarketsView Methodology

Trade is extremely important to Moldova’s economy; the combined value of exports and imports equals 115 percent of GDP. The average applied tariff rate is 3.4 percent. Nontariff barriers impede trade. Government openness to foreign investment is below average. The financial sector is relatively stable, but the level of financial intermediation remains shallow, and government interference is significant.

Country's Score Over Time

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Regional Ranking

rank country overall change
1Switzerland81.70.2
2Ireland80.43.7
3Estonia78.8-0.3
4United Kingdom781.6
5Iceland772.6
6Denmark76.61.5
7Luxembourg76.40.5
8Sweden76.31.4
9Georgia76.20.2
10Netherlands76.20.4
11Lithuania75.3-0.5
12Norway74.30.3
13Czech Republic74.20.9
14Germany74.20.4
15Finland74.10.1
16Latvia73.6-1.2
17Austria71.8-0.5
18Macedonia71.30.6
19Romania69.4-0.3
20Armenia68.7-1.6
21Poland68.50.2
22Malta68.50.8
23Bulgaria68.30.4
24Cyprus67.8-0.1
25Belgium67.5-0.3
26Hungary 66.70.9
27Kosovo66.6-1.3
28Turkey65.40.2
29Slovakia65.3-0.4
30Spain65.11.5
31Slovenia64.85.6
32Albania64.50.1
33Montenegro64.32.3
34France63.90.6
35Portugal63.40.8
36Italy62.50.0
37Serbia 62.53.6
38Bosnia and Herzegovina61.41.2
39Croatia611.6
40Moldova58.40.4
41Russia58.21.1
42Belarus58.1-0.5
43Greece57.32.3
44Ukraine51.93.8
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