2017 Index of Economic Freedom

Côte d'Ivoire

overall score63.0
world rank75
Rule of Law

Property Rights42.6

Government Integrity34.3

Judicial Effectiveness45.8

Government Size

Government Spending84.6

Tax Burden78.4

Fiscal Health87.0

Regulatory Efficiency

Business Freedom62.1

Labor Freedom50.6

Monetary Freedom73.2

Open Markets

Trade Freedom72.3

Investment Freedom75.0

Financial Freedom50.0

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Quick Facts
  • Population:
    • 23.3 million
  • GDP (PPP):
    • $78.6 billion
    • 8.6% growth
    • 6.3% 5-year compound annual growth
    • $3,316 per capita
  • Unemployment:
    • 9.5%
  • Inflation (CPI):
    • 1.2%
  • FDI Inflow:
    • $430.2 million
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Côte d’Ivoire’s economic expansion has been notable, with a robust GDP growth rate averaging around 6 percent over the past five years. The government has undertaken much-needed reforms to maintain and further enhance the potential for growth. These measures include strengthening management of public finances and regulatory reforms to foster the emergence of a more dynamic private sector. Fiscal policy has focused on promoting investment and funding other development needs.

Effective implementation of deeper institutional reforms related to the rule of law remains critical to reinforcing vibrant economic growth. Protection of property rights and anticorruption measures are not enforced effectively, and the judiciary remains vulnerable to political influence.

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Background

In 2002, Côte d’Ivoire plunged into a civil war that lasted until peace largely returned in 2007, when rebel leader Guillaume Soro joined President Laurent Gbagbo’s government as prime minister. After the 2010 presidential elections, Gbagbo refused to surrender power to internationally recognized winner Alassane Ouattara. U.N. and French forces removed Gbagbo, who is now facing trial at The Hague on charges of crimes against humanity. Ouattara won a second term in late 2015, and the U.N. plans to withdraw its troops by April 2017. Côte d’Ivoire is West Africa’s second-largest economy and a leading producer of cocoa and cashews.

Rule of LawView Methodology

Property Rights 42.6 Create a Graph using this measurement

Government Integrity 34.3 Create a Graph using this measurement

Judicial Effectiveness 45.8 Create a Graph using this measurement

Protection of property rights is fragile, and land titles are rare outside of urban areas, although the introduction of new alternative dispute resolution mechanisms has made it easier to enforce contracts. The judiciary is not independent, and judges are highly susceptible to external interference and bribes. Corruption persists in the judiciary, the police, the military, customs, contract awards, tax offices, and other government institutions.

Government SizeView Methodology

The top individual income tax rate is 36 percent, and the top corporate tax rate is 25 percent. Other taxes include a value-added tax and a tax on interest. The overall tax burden equals 15.5 percent of total domestic income. Government spending has amounted to 22.7 percent of total output (GDP) over the past three years, and budget deficits have averaged 2.6 percent of GDP. Public debt is equivalent to 34.7 percent of GDP.

Regulatory EfficiencyView Methodology

Considerable effort has been made to modernize the regulatory framework. The business start-up process has become more straightforward, and minimum capital requirements have been reduced. The nonsalary cost of employing a worker is relatively low. To lessen dependence on cocoa, the government encourages crop diversification by guaranteeing high prices for other crops while still guaranteeing a minimum price to cocoa farmers.

Open MarketsView Methodology

Trade is important to Côte d’Ivoire’s economy; the value of exports and imports taken together equals 88 percent of GDP. The average applied tariff rate is 6.3 percent. The government does not screen or discriminate against most foreign investment. The financial system is dominated by banking, which, despite some modernization and restructuring, still lacks the capacity to support rapid private-sector growth.

Country's Score Over Time

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Regional Ranking

rank country overall change
1Mauritius74.70.0
2Botswana70.1-1.0
3Rwanda67.64.5
4Côte d'Ivoire 633.0
5Namibia62.50.6
6South Africa62.30.4
7Seychelles61.8-0.4
8Swaziland61.11.4
9Uganda60.91.6
10Burkina Faso59.60.5
11Benin59.2-0.1
12Mali58.62.1
13Gabon58.6-0.4
14Tanzania58.60.1
15Madagascar57.4-3.7
16Nigeria57.1-0.4
17Cabo Verde56.9-9.6
18Democratic Republic of Congo56.410.0
19Ghana56.2-6.8
20Guinea-Bissau56.14.3
21Senegal55.9-2.2
22Comoros55.83.4
23Zambia55.8-3.0
24São Tomé and Príncipe 55.4-1.3
25Mauritania54.4-0.4
26Lesotho53.93.3
27Kenya53.5-4.0
28The Gambia53.4-3.7
29Togo53.2-0.4
30Burundi53.2-0.7
31Ethiopia52.71.2
32Sierra Leone52.60.3
33Malawi52.20.4
34Cameroon51.8-2.4
35Central African Republic51.86.6
36Niger50.8-3.5
37Mozambique 49.9-3.3
38Liberia49.1-3.1
39Chad492.7
40Sudan48.8N/A
41Angola48.5-0.4
42Guinea47.6-5.7
43Djibouti46.7-9.3
44Equatorial Guinea451.3
45Zimbabwe445.8
46Eritrea42.2-0.5
47Republic of Congo 40-2.8
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