Election Fraud Cases

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State Year Name Case Type Fraud Type Details
StateMinnesotaYear2018NameJeffrey SpanierCase TypeCriminal ConvictionFraud TypeIneligible VotingDetails

Jeffrey Spanier was convicted of felony gambling charges in 2014, but still completed a Minnesota voter registration form in November 2016, falsely certifying that he was not a felon. He pleaded guilty to a felony count of registering to vote while ineligible, and was sentenced to four years on probation, with a stay of imposition, and ordered to pay $137 in fees.

StateOklahomaYear2018NameRonald HenryCase TypeCriminal ConvictionFraud TypeFraudulent Use Of Absentee BallotsDetails

Ronald Henry, a 2015 candidate for trustee in Luther, Oklahoma, brought several absentee ballots to be notarized by Mayor Cecilia Taft. It is illegal for a ballot to be notarized without the person signing being present. Ronald Henry entered an Alford plea to the charges and received a five-year deferred sentence.

StateCaliforniaYear2018NameRichard HowardCase TypeCriminal ConvictionFraud TypeBallot Petition FraudDetails

Richard Howard offered homeless people cash and cigarettes in exchange for forging signatures on official petitions using the names and addresses of actual registered voters, in order to qualify several ballot measures. Howard and several others were arrested during an undercover operation. He pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor charge and was sentenced to 60 days in jail and 3 years of probation.

StateColoradoYear2018NameNathan ParksCase TypeCriminal ConvictionFraud TypeDuplicate VotingDetails

Nathan Parks pleaded guilty to voting in both Colorado and Washington in the 2016 election. Parks resided and voted in Washington during the November election, but also maintained his Colorado voter registration and used it to cast an absentee ballot there. After pleading guilty to a misdemeanor charge, Parks was given a 12-month deferred sentence, and was ordered to complete 30 hours of community service and pay courts costs and restitution fees.

StateIllinoisYear2018NameThomas RuddCase TypeCriminal ConvictionFraud TypeBallot Petition FraudDetails

Thomas Rudd, a former coroner in Lake County, Illinois, was charged with five felony counts of perjury for making false statements on nominating petitions for his 2016 re-election. Rudd signed the petitions, falsely indicating he had been personally present when voters signed them, and later made the same claim under oath. Prosecutors alleged that 15-20 petition signatures were falsified, including one in the name of a person who had been dead for over 10 years. The felony charges were dismissed as part of a plea deal, and Rudd pleaded guilty to five misdemeanor charges of disregard of the election code. He was given 24 months of probation, ordered to pay two $5,000 fines, and was barred from public employment for five years.

StateIllinoisYear2018NameEllen MauerCase TypeCriminal ConvictionFraud TypeBallot Petition FraudDetails

During her 2017 campaign for the High School District 128 board, Ellen Mauer signed four nomination petitions to be placed on the ballot as a candidate, falsely claiming she was present when voters signed them. Mauer initially faced felony perjury charges, but a plea deal saw those charges reduced to misdemeanor counts of disregard of the election code. Mauer pleaded guilty and was sentenced to one year of court supervision, and was ordered to complete 75 hours of public service, pay a $750 fine, and make a $250 donation to the Zacharias Sexual Abuse Center.

StateIllinoisYear2018NameDenise ZwitCase TypeCriminal ConvictionFraud TypeBallot Petition FraudDetails

Denise Zwit, assistant to the High School District 128 Superintendant, signed three nomination petitions for school board president Patrick Groody, falsely claiming she was present when voters signed them. Zwit initially faced felony perjury charges, but a plea deal saw those charges reduced to misdemeanor counts of disregard of the election code. Zwit pleaded guilty and was sentenced to one year of court supervision, and was ordered to complete 75 hours of public service, pay a $750 fine, and make a $250 donation to the Zacharias Sexual Abuse Center.

StateMarylandYear2018NameChris StroughCase TypeCriminal ConvictionFraud TypeBallot Petition FraudDetails

Chris Strough and her husband, Queensbury Supervisor John Strough, violated state election law while obtaining signatures on a petition to get John Strough on the Conservative Party primary ballot. John Strough, a Democrat, was required by law to have a notary present for each signature he obtained because he was targeting voters outside of his own party. His wife, a notary public, claimed to have witnessed each signature and read the signer an oath to swear. However, investigators determined she actually remained in the car for many signatures and did not interact with voters. As part of a plea deal, Chris Strough pleaded guilty to disorderly conduct, was fined $200, and gave up her notary license, while charges against John Strough will be dismissed pending six months of good behavior.

StateMinnesotaYear2018NameLarry RekerCase TypeDiversion ProgramFraud TypeDuplicate VotingDetails

Larry Reker, of Worthington, voted twice in a contentious Independent School District 518 bond referendum special election, once in person and once by absentee ballot. Reker pleaded guilty to a felony unlawful voting charge but final adjudication was withheld. He was sentenced to two years of supervised probation and a $500 fine. If he completes the supervised probation, his record will be cleared.

StateMississippiYear2018NameCory Ferreaz Case TypeCriminal ConvictionFraud TypeFalse RegistrationsDetails

Cory Ferreaz, of Hattiesburg, pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor charge of illegally voting outside his legal district. Ferreaz sought to run for state representative for District 102 in 2017. To run, he filed paperwork attesting to having been a resident of Hattiesburg, part of Forrest County, for two years. However, Ferreaz admitted to voting in Lowndes County in 2015 despite not residing there. He was given a six month suspended sentence, and was ordered to pay court costs, a $200 fine, and a $200 assessment to the Crime Victims Compensation Fund.

StateNew HampshireYear2018NameAnonymousCase TypeOfficial FindingFraud TypeFraudulent Use Of Absentee BallotsDetails

A woman filled out her late husband's absentee ballot for the 2016 general election, claiming he had done so prior to his death. She was given a $500 civil penalty. Her case was included in an official report compiled by New Hampshire Secretary of State Bill Gardner and other state election officials, but her name was redacted.

StateNew HampshireYear2018NameAnonymousCase TypeOfficial FindingFraud TypeDuplicate VotingDetails

A man who owned property in both Hampton and Salem voted once in each town. He admitted to investigators that he had done this previously. He was given a $2,500 civil fine and officially warned he faced criminal prosecution if he did it again. His case was included in an official report compiled by New Hampshire Secretary of State Bill Gardner and other state election officials, but his name was redacted.

StateNew HampshireYear2018NameAnonymousCase TypeOfficial FindingFraud TypeFalse RegistrationsDetails

Two individuals voted in 2016 in Dixville Notch's primary, despite not residing or having established a domicile there. They were warned they would face criminal prosecution if they did it again. Their cases were included in an official report compiled by New Hampshire Secretary of State Bill Gardner and other state election officials, but their names were redacted.

StateIllinoisYear2018NameCalvin Borders, Jr.Case TypeCriminal ConvictionFraud TypeFalse RegistrationsDetails

Calvin Borders, Jr., along with his son, daughter, and his son's girlfriend, registered to vote using a vacant lot on Jefferson Street in Brooklyn, Illinois. None of them lived in the city. After an investigation by the Public Corruption Task Force, he pleaded guilty to perjury in violation of the election code and was sentenced to probation with special conditions.

StateIllinoisYear2018NameJesse JohnsonCase TypeCriminal ConvictionFraud TypeDuplicate VotingDetails

Jesse Johnson was convicted of voting twice in the 2016 primary elections, once for a Republican and once for a Democrat. Johnson, who had previously been convicted on weapons and drug charges, was charged with perjury after the St. Clair County Public Corruption Task Force detected his effort to vote twice. Johnson was convicted and, owing to his prior criminal record, was sentenced to two years in Illinois state prison.

State Year Name Case Type Fraud Type Source Details
Minnesota 2018 Jeffrey Spanier Criminal Conviction Ineligible Voting on.sctimes.com/2GIs1JI

Jeffrey Spanier was convicted of felony gambling charges in 2014, but still completed a Minnesota voter registration form in November 2016, falsely certifying that he was not a felon. He pleaded guilty to a felony count of registering to vote while ineligible, and was sentenced to four years on probation, with a stay of imposition, and ordered to pay $137 in fees.

Oklahoma 2018 Ronald Henry Criminal Conviction Fraudulent Use Of Absentee Ballots bit.ly/2pQJdCy, bit.ly/2uAIbAg

Ronald Henry, a 2015 candidate for trustee in Luther, Oklahoma, brought several absentee ballots to be notarized by Mayor Cecilia Taft. It is illegal for a ballot to be notarized without the person signing being present. Ronald Henry entered an Alford plea to the charges and received a five-year deferred sentence.

California 2018 Richard Howard Criminal Conviction Ballot Petition Fraud bit.ly/2Mmxxpe

Richard Howard offered homeless people cash and cigarettes in exchange for forging signatures on official petitions using the names and addresses of actual registered voters, in order to qualify several ballot measures. Howard and several others were arrested during an undercover operation. He pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor charge and was sentenced to 60 days in jail and 3 years of probation.

Colorado 2018 Nathan Parks Criminal Conviction Duplicate Voting bit.ly/2KXN5dq, bit.ly/2nKK72W

Nathan Parks pleaded guilty to voting in both Colorado and Washington in the 2016 election. Parks resided and voted in Washington during the November election, but also maintained his Colorado voter registration and used it to cast an absentee ballot there. After pleading guilty to a misdemeanor charge, Parks was given a 12-month deferred sentence, and was ordered to complete 30 hours of community service and pay courts costs and restitution fees.

Illinois 2018 Thomas Rudd Criminal Conviction Ballot Petition Fraud trib.in/2MRf3Js, bit.ly/2vLytJc

Thomas Rudd, a former coroner in Lake County, Illinois, was charged with five felony counts of perjury for making false statements on nominating petitions for his 2016 re-election. Rudd signed the petitions, falsely indicating he had been personally present when voters signed them, and later made the same claim under oath. Prosecutors alleged that 15-20 petition signatures were falsified, including one in the name of a person who had been dead for over 10 years. The felony charges were dismissed as part of a plea deal, and Rudd pleaded guilty to five misdemeanor charges of disregard of the election code. He was given 24 months of probation, ordered to pay two $5,000 fines, and was barred from public employment for five years.

Illinois 2018 Ellen Mauer Criminal Conviction Ballot Petition Fraud bit.ly/2PcAd6y, trib.in/2BiqLf6

During her 2017 campaign for the High School District 128 board, Ellen Mauer signed four nomination petitions to be placed on the ballot as a candidate, falsely claiming she was present when voters signed them. Mauer initially faced felony perjury charges, but a plea deal saw those charges reduced to misdemeanor counts of disregard of the election code. Mauer pleaded guilty and was sentenced to one year of court supervision, and was ordered to complete 75 hours of public service, pay a $750 fine, and make a $250 donation to the Zacharias Sexual Abuse Center.

Illinois 2018 Denise Zwit Criminal Conviction Ballot Petition Fraud bit.ly/2PcAd6y, trib.in/2BiqLf6

Denise Zwit, assistant to the High School District 128 Superintendant, signed three nomination petitions for school board president Patrick Groody, falsely claiming she was present when voters signed them. Zwit initially faced felony perjury charges, but a plea deal saw those charges reduced to misdemeanor counts of disregard of the election code. Zwit pleaded guilty and was sentenced to one year of court supervision, and was ordered to complete 75 hours of public service, pay a $750 fine, and make a $250 donation to the Zacharias Sexual Abuse Center.

Maryland 2018 Chris Strough Criminal Conviction Ballot Petition Fraud bit.ly/2OGYuRb, bit.ly/2MUgYwW

Chris Strough and her husband, Queensbury Supervisor John Strough, violated state election law while obtaining signatures on a petition to get John Strough on the Conservative Party primary ballot. John Strough, a Democrat, was required by law to have a notary present for each signature he obtained because he was targeting voters outside of his own party. His wife, a notary public, claimed to have witnessed each signature and read the signer an oath to swear. However, investigators determined she actually remained in the car for many signatures and did not interact with voters. As part of a plea deal, Chris Strough pleaded guilty to disorderly conduct, was fined $200, and gave up her notary license, while charges against John Strough will be dismissed pending six months of good behavior.

Minnesota 2018 Larry Reker Diversion Program Duplicate Voting bit.ly/2nLCd9b, bit.ly/2OFH1IC

Larry Reker, of Worthington, voted twice in a contentious Independent School District 518 bond referendum special election, once in person and once by absentee ballot. Reker pleaded guilty to a felony unlawful voting charge but final adjudication was withheld. He was sentenced to two years of supervised probation and a $500 fine. If he completes the supervised probation, his record will be cleared.

Mississippi 2018 Cory Ferreaz Criminal Conviction False Registrations hatne.ws/2MvaTKs

Cory Ferreaz, of Hattiesburg, pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor charge of illegally voting outside his legal district. Ferreaz sought to run for state representative for District 102 in 2017. To run, he filed paperwork attesting to having been a resident of Hattiesburg, part of Forrest County, for two years. However, Ferreaz admitted to voting in Lowndes County in 2015 despite not residing there. He was given a six month suspended sentence, and was ordered to pay court costs, a $200 fine, and a $200 assessment to the Crime Victims Compensation Fund.

New Hampshire 2018 Anonymous Official Finding Fraudulent Use Of Absentee Ballots bit.ly/2KXx3jQ, bit.ly/2KXxj2i

A woman filled out her late husband's absentee ballot for the 2016 general election, claiming he had done so prior to his death. She was given a $500 civil penalty. Her case was included in an official report compiled by New Hampshire Secretary of State Bill Gardner and other state election officials, but her name was redacted.

New Hampshire 2018 Anonymous Official Finding Duplicate Voting bit.ly/2KXx3jQ, bit.ly/2KXxj2i

A man who owned property in both Hampton and Salem voted once in each town. He admitted to investigators that he had done this previously. He was given a $2,500 civil fine and officially warned he faced criminal prosecution if he did it again. His case was included in an official report compiled by New Hampshire Secretary of State Bill Gardner and other state election officials, but his name was redacted.

New Hampshire 2018 Anonymous Official Finding False Registrations bit.ly/2KXx3jQ, bit.ly/2KXxj2i

Two individuals voted in 2016 in Dixville Notch's primary, despite not residing or having established a domicile there. They were warned they would face criminal prosecution if they did it again. Their cases were included in an official report compiled by New Hampshire Secretary of State Bill Gardner and other state election officials, but their names were redacted.

Illinois 2018 Calvin Borders, Jr. Criminal Conviction False Registrations bit.ly/2MPkRU4, bit.ly/2MggG7v

Calvin Borders, Jr., along with his son, daughter, and his son's girlfriend, registered to vote using a vacant lot on Jefferson Street in Brooklyn, Illinois. None of them lived in the city. After an investigation by the Public Corruption Task Force, he pleaded guilty to perjury in violation of the election code and was sentenced to probation with special conditions.

Illinois 2018 Jesse Johnson Criminal Conviction Duplicate Voting bit.ly/2SonSh8, bit.ly/2Sqf0rz

Jesse Johnson was convicted of voting twice in the 2016 primary elections, once for a Republican and once for a Democrat. Johnson, who had previously been convicted on weapons and drug charges, was charged with perjury after the St. Clair County Public Corruption Task Force detected his effort to vote twice. Johnson was convicted and, owing to his prior criminal record, was sentenced to two years in Illinois state prison.

Illinois 2018 Calvin Borders III Criminal Conviction False Registrations bit.ly/2MPkRU4, bit.ly/2MggG7v

Calvin Borders III, along with his father, sister, and girlfriend, registered to vote using a vacant lot on Jefferson Street in Brooklyn, Illinois. None of them lived in the city. Borders III pleaded guilty to perjury and was sentenced to probation with special conditions.

Illinois 2018 Candice Borders Criminal Conviction False Registrations bit.ly/2MPkRU4, bit.ly/2MggG7v

Candice Borders, along with her father, brother, and her brother's girlfriend, registered to vote using a vacant lot on Jefferson Street in Brooklyn, Illinois. None of them lived in the city. Candace Borders pleaded guilty to forgery and was sentenced to probation with special conditions.

Illinois 2018 Janie Walker Criminal Conviction False Registrations bit.ly/2MPkRU4, bit.ly/2MggG7v, bit.ly/2StXT8f

Janie Walker, along with her boyfriend, his father, and his sister, registered to vote using a vacant lot on Jefferson Street in Brooklyn, Illinois. None of them lived in the city. Janie Walker pleaded guilty to forgery and is scheduled to be sentenced in November.

Illinois 2018 Marcello Villaruz Criminal Conviction Ineligible Voting trib.in/2zdkpt9, bit.ly/2zfRy7E

Marcello Villaruz and his wife Gina claimed to be U.S. citizens when they voted in the 2016 presidential election. Marcello was charged with two felony counts of perjury, but, as part of a plea agreement, pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor disorderly conduct charge. Marcello Villaruz was sentenced to six months of probation and ordered to pay a $200 fine and to complete 20 hours of community service.

Illinois 2018 Gina Villaruz Criminal Conviction Ineligible Voting trib.in/2zdkpt9, bit.ly/2zfRy7E

Gina Villaruz and her husband Marcello claimed to be U.S. citizens when they voted in the 2016 presidential election. Gina was charged with two felony counts of perjury, but, as part of a plea agreement, pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor disorderly conduct charge. Gina Villaruz was sentenced to six months of probation and ordered to pay a $200 fine and to complete 20 hours of community service.

Illinois 2018 Yvette Yust Criminal Conviction Ineligible Voting trib.in/2zdkpt9, bit.ly/2zfRy7E

Yvette Yust, a resident of Waukegan, claimed to be a citizen in order to vote in the 2016 presidential election. Yust was charged with two felony counts of perjury, but, as part of a plea agreement, pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor disorderly conduct charge. Yust was sentenced to six months of probation and ordered to pay a $200 fine and to complete 20 hours of community service.

New York 2018 Bert Goldfinger Criminal Conviction Duplicate Voting bit.ly/2zbBlAk, bit.ly/2zfM5gL

Bert Goldfinger voted twice in the 2013 general election - by absentee ballot in Columbia County, and in person in New York City. At the time, Goldfinger was a dentist in New York who maintained a summer home in Columbia County. Goldfinger initially faced two felony charges for knowingly filing a false instrument and illegal voting, but as part of a plea agreement, he pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor disorderly conduct charge. Goldfinger was ordered to pay a fine and surcharge of $225 and complete 20 hours of community service.

North Carolina 2018 Alessandro Cannizzaro Criminal Conviction Ineligible Voting Case No. 5:18-cr-00328-BO, bit.ly/2JIuCmd, bit.ly/2zlXj3J

Alessandro Cannizzaro, of Italy, pleaded guilty to a charge of illegal voting by an alien. Cannizzaro was one of nineteen non-citizens prosecuted in the Eastern District of North Carolina for illegally voting in the 2016 election. Cannizzaro was ordered to pay a $200 fine and a $10 special assessment.

Pennsylvania 2018 Calvin Mattox Criminal Conviction Miscellaneous bit.ly/2zc7I1A, cbsloc.al/2zfYBNh

Calvin Mattox, a Philadelphia election-board worker, pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor "qualification of election officials" charge. Mattox, a Democrat, worked at Poll 43-7 despite not being a resident of the 43rd Ward as required by state law. He and three others were charged following allegations of fraud in a 2017 special election for the statehouse seat for the 197th District. The cabal were accused of, among other things, intimidating voters who did not want to vote for the Democrat candidate. In court, witnesses testified that they were not able to cast ballots for the candidates of their choice. Mattox was sentenced to one year of probation and stripped of his voting rights until 2022.

Pennsylvania 2018 Wallace Hill Criminal Conviction Miscellaneous bit.ly/2zbCtUp, bit.ly/2zc7I1A

Wallace Hill, a translator at Philadelphia Poll 43-7, pleaded guilty to a charge of failure to perform duty. Hill and three other board members were indicted after allegations of fraud in Philadelphia's 43rd Ward surfaced after the 2017 special election for the statehouse seat for the 197th District. The cabal were accused of, among other things, intimidating voters who did not want to vote for the Democratic candidate. In court, witnesses testified that they were not able to cast ballots for the candidates of their choice. Hill was sentenced to 18 months of probation and was stripped of his right to vote until 2022.

Pennsylvania 2018 Thurman George Criminal Conviction Miscellaneous bit.ly/2zcmqpj, cbsloc.al/2zfYBNh

Thurman George, a Democrat election-board member and machine inspector at Philadelphia Poll 43-7, pleaded guilty to a felony charge of fraud by an election officer. George and three other board members were indicted after allegations of fraud in Philadelphia's 43rd Ward surfaced after the 2017 special election for the statehouse seat for the 197th District. The cabal were accused of, among other things, intimidating voters who did not want to vote for the Democratic candidate. In court, witnesses testified that they were not able to cast ballots for the candidates of their choice. George was sentenced to five years of probation and was stripped of his right to vote until 2022.

Pennsylvania 2018 Dolores Shaw Diversion Program Miscellaneous bit.ly/2zbCtUp, bit.ly/2zc7I1A, cbsloc.al/2zfYBNh

Dolores Shaw, the Judge of Election at Philadelphia Poll 43-7, and three other election-board members were indicted after allegations of fraud in Philadelphia's 43rd Ward surfaced after the 2017 special election for the statehouse seat for the 197th District. The cabal were accused of, among other things, intimidating voters who did not want to vote for the Democratic candidate. In court, witnesses testified that they were not able to cast ballots for the candidates of their choice. Shaw received an accelerated rehabilitative disposition for compromising the local election board.

Texas 2018 Miguel Hernandez Criminal Conviction Fraudulent Use Of Absentee Ballots bit.ly/2zaemWj, bit.ly/2zg2yl5

Miguel Hernandez visited an elderly woman shortly before the 2017 Dallas City Council election, collected her blank absentee ballot, filled it out, and forged her signature before mailing it back. Hernandez was the first person arrested as part of a larger voter fraud investigation in the Dallas area, stemming from claims by elderly voters that someone was forging their signatures and the return of nearly 700 mail-in ballots all signed by the same witness using a fake name. Hernandez faced a felony illegal voting charge, but pleaded to a lesser misdemeanor offense of "method of returning marked ballot." He was sentenced to 180 days in jail and given credit for time served.

Texas 2018 Russ Casey Criminal Conviction Ballot Petition Fraud bit.ly/2zcdz74

Russ Casey, a Texas Justice of the Peace, submitted false signatures in order to ensure his place on the Republican primary ballot during his 2018 reelection campaign. Casey withdrew and resigned following the revelation that he had falsified multiple petition signatures and falsely attested to having witnessed the signatures. Casey pleaded guilty to a charge of tampering with a government record, and received a suspended two-year prison sentence and five years of probation.

Texas 2018 Rosita Flores Criminal Conviction Illegal "Assistance" At The Polls bit.ly/2zcAEGS

Rosita Flores, of Robstown, illegally obtained an elderly voter's mail-ballot, filled it out, and cast the ballot without the permission of the voter. Flores pleaded guilty and received a suspended one-year jail sentence, 18 months of probation, and was ordered to pay a $1,000 fine and $316 in court costs. She was also ordered to complete 60 hours of community service and spend 10 consecutive Saturdays in the San Patricio County Jail.

Virginia 2018 Cassandra Amber Marie Ritter Criminal Conviction Ineligible Voting bit.ly/2zcXldZ

Cassandra Ritter, a felon convicted on heroin distribution charges, cast a ballot despite being an ineligible voter due to her prior conviction. Ritter pleaded guilty and received a suspended two-year prison sentence and two years of supervised probation.

West Virginia 2018 Jeffrey Hartman Criminal Conviction False Registrations bit.ly/2Suajgq, bit.ly/2SrvvU9

Jeffrey Hartman, a resident of Westminster, Maryland, illegally registered to vote in both Maryland and Morgan County, West Virginia, and cast ballots in both states nine times since 2006. Hartman pleaded guilty in West Virginia to illegal voting and was given a suspended 30-day jail sentence, was put on probation for one year, and ordered to pay a $100 fine and court costs.

Connecticut 2018 Troy Stevenson Criminal Conviction Fraudulent Use Of Absentee Ballots bit.ly/2EXrYKs, bit.ly/2CWpFF5

Troy Stevenson was convicted of making a false statement on an absentee ballot as well as second degree forgery, both class D felonies. He committed this crime on October 28, 2017, in connection with the November 2017 mayoral election in Stafford. Stevenson was given a three year suspended sentence.

Connecticut 2018 Betty Chappell Criminal Conviction Fraudulent Use Of Absentee Ballots bit.ly/2EXrYKs, bit.ly/2CWpFF5

Betty Chappell was convicted of making a false statement on an absentee ballot as well as second degree forgery, both class D felonies. She committed this crime on October 28, 2017, in connection with the November 2017 mayoral election in Stafford. Chappell received a five year suspended sentence.

Illinois 2018 Janet Pokryfke Criminal Conviction Duplicate Voting bit.ly/2zlhPkP

Janet Pokryfke voted twice in the November 2016 election. She entered an Alford. Per her plea agreement, she was convicted of one misdemeanor count of disregarding the election code while two felony double voting charges and one perjury charge were dropped. Pokryfke was sentenced to six months of probation, and was ordered to complete 20 hours of community service and pay a $200 fine.

North Carolina 2018 Roberto Hernandez-Cuarenta Criminal Conviction Ineligible Voting bit.ly/2znNodA, bit.ly/2zmJVvZ

Roberto Hernandez-Cuarenta voted in both the 2012 and 2016 presidential elections despite not being a citizen. Hernandez-Cuarenta, a Mexican citizen, was granted a Special Agricultural Worker application in 1992 and had since acquired permanent resident status. He was convicted on two charges of voting by an alien, and was sentenced to time served, which amounted to four months of incarceration.

North Dakota 2018 Hannan Yassin Aboubaker Criminal Conviction Duplicate Voting bit.ly/2zcskqt, bit.ly/2DiNXKi

Hannan Yassin Aboubaker submitted an absentee ballot in Minnesota's Scott County for the 2016 election. She then voted at the Fargo Public Library in North Dakota "since she believed her absentee ballot for Minnesota was null and void." Aboubaker pleaded guilty to voting twice by entering an Alford plea to a Class A misdemeanor election offense. Her sentence was deferred, and she was placed on unsupervised probation for six months, after which the case will be dismissed if she does not violate the term of her probation.

Texas 2018 Kleberg County, TX Judicial Finding Election Overturned bit.ly/2zgdbEz, bit.ly/2P4S96y

A closely contested run-off election for a Justice of Peace seat was overturned by Visiting District Court Judge Joel Johnson, following a two-day hearing. A challenge to the election was filed by Ofelia "Ofie" Gutierrez, the candidate running against long time seatholder, Esequiel "Cheque" De La Paz, for the Justice of the Peace seat in Kleberg County. After a recount narrowed the vote differential to just six votes (312 to 318), seven of the sixteen votes contested by Guiterrez were thrown out by Judge Johnson, because they were cast by relatives of De La Paz who lived outside the Precinct 4 boundaries. A new election was ordered to be held before the end of August.

Texas 2018 Kaufman County, TX Judicial Finding Election Overturned bit.ly/2Dg3wCt, bit.ly/2Dg2Xsl, bit.ly/2Dg1yC5

In a Republican primary for a seat on the Kaufman County Court, Dennis Jones appeared to beat his challenger Tracy Gray by one vote. Gray challenged the results, claiming that a "vote harvester" had submitted a number of illegal mail-in ballots and that numerous eligible provisional ballots were uncounted. A district judge agreed, invalidating the election results and ordering a new election. The special election was held on July 21 and Tracy Gray prevailed, winning by 404 votes.

Texas 2018 Laura Janeth Garza Criminal Conviction Ineligible Voting bit.ly/2zrZ9QD, bit.ly/2zj96zG

Laura Janeth Garza, a Mexican citizen, pleaded guilty to two felony charges of voter impersonation and ineligible voting. Garza stole the identity of her cousin, a US citizen, in order to remain in the United States, and used it to register and vote in multiple elections, including the 2016 presidential election. Garza received a probated 10-year prison sentence, 180 days in jail, and was ordered to pay a $10,000 fine. After her jail term is completed, Garza will be deported.

Texas 2018 Mario Obdulio Orellana Criminal Conviction Ineligible Voting bit.ly/2Q8u4Zi, bit.ly/2RtzfD8, bit.ly/2zuOBjJ

Mario Obdulio Orellana, a 57-year-old Salvadoran national, was indicted in June 2018 by the Department of Justice on federal immigration and voter fraud violations. An investigation by the U.S. Attorney's office in the Eastern District of Texas revealed that Orellana illegally entered the United States in the 1980s, falsified documents to obtain a U.S. birth certificate and social security number, and then used these documents to apply for a U.S. passport and register to vote. His five-count indictment included voter fraud charges related to his voting in the November 2016 election. As part of a plea agreement, Orellana pleaded guilty to making false statements in a U.S. passport application in exchange for the other charges being dropped. He faces up to 10 years in federal prison.

Texas 2018 City of Mission, TX Judicial Finding Election Overturned bit.ly/2AG1aKA, bit.ly/2OirgqH, bit.ly/2qmTLtT

Armando O'Cana won a run-off mayoral election in Mission, Texas, unseating longtime holder Norberto 'Beto' Salinas. Salinas contested the results of the election, after strong evidence emerged that O'Cana's campaign was bribing voters, tampering with mail-in ballots, and improperly assisting voters at the polls. After a two week trial during which numerous witnesses testified, Judge J. Bonner Dorsey voided the election stating, 'I hold or find, by clear and convincing evidence, that the number of illegal votes was in excess of 158.' Attorneys for O'Cana are currently appealing the ruling in the 13th Texas Court of Appeals.

Virginia 2018 Shaun Brown Judicial Finding Ballot Petition Fraud bit.ly/2zfTjl7, bit.ly/2zs7bcf, bit.ly/2zjQcIP

Shaun Brown, a candidate for the Virginia 2nd Congressional District, was removed from the ballot in the lead-up to the 2018 election after a judge ruled that signatures on the petition to get her on the ballot had been forged. Brown, who ran and lost as a Democrat in 2016, was running as an Independent. Democrats in Virginia filed the suit against Brown, claiming that Republican incumbent Representative Scott Taylor's campaign hoped to get Brown on the ballot to bolster Taylor's own re-election chances. All of the petition signatures submitted by Taylor's staff were thrown out due to errors and forgeries. Brown appealed, but the Virginia Supreme Court upheld her removal from the ballot. An investigation into the alleged forgeries by Taylor campaign staff is ongoing. In the midst of the election drama, Brown was convicted on unrelated charges that she defrauded a federal program intended to serve summer meals to children.

Wisconsin 2018 Peggy West Criminal Conviction Ballot Petition Fraud bit.ly/2zle3b9, bit.ly/2zlln6J, bit.ly/2zpLOYK

Peggy West, a former Milwaukee county supervisor, submitted false signatures on a petition to place her on the ballot for the spring 2018 election. According to the complaint filed against her, West forged the signatures of multiple residents within her district, and used a third party to collect other signatures despite the legal requirement that she collect them herself. She later falsely attested to have done so. West pleaded guilty to a charge of election fraud, and was sentenced to two years of probation and ordered to pay a $2,500 fine.

Florida 2018 Bret Warren Criminal Conviction Fraudulent Use Of Absentee Ballots bit.ly/2Db1jWo, bit.ly/2HQqsLQ (Case No. 2018CF001075A)

Bret Warren, of Casselberry, entered a plea of nolo-contendere to two third-degree felony voter fraud charges. Warren's fraud was uncovered when five residents of Altamonte Springs noted they had not received their absentee ballots for the 2016 presidential election. The ballots had nonetheless been returned, and were filled out and signed. Investigators matched fingerprints on the envelope to Warren through a federal database, and DNA obtained from the envelope also matched Warren. Warren was charged with two counts of felony false swearing in connection with voting or elections, and after pleading nolo-contendere was sentenced to 154 days' imprisonment with credit for time served, and ordered to pay $468 in fees and court costs.

North Carolina 2018 Jose Cruz Solano-Rodriguez Criminal Conviction Ineligible Voting Case No. 2:18-cr-00029-BO, bit.ly/2zlXj3J, bit.ly/2JIuCmd, bit.ly/2BtQTRZ

Jose Cruz Solano-Rodriguez, of Mexico, pleaded guilty to one count of voting by an alien. He was one of nineteen non-citizens prosecuted in the Eastern District of North Carolina for illegally voting in the 2016 election. Solano-Rodriguez also faced a second charge that he falsely claimed citizenship in order to register to vote, but that charge was dropped as part of a plea agreement. Solano-Rodriguez was ordered to pay a $100 fine and a $25 special assessment.

North Carolina 2018 Ramon Esteban Paez-Jerez Criminal Conviction Ineligible Voting Case No. 5:18-cr-00131-FL, bit.ly/2JIuCmd, bit.ly/2JIuCmd, nyti.ms/2SxyJbL, bit.ly/2zlXj3J

Ramon Esteban Paez-Jerez, of the Dominican Republic, pleaded guilty to two charges of passport fraud and illegal voting by an alien. Paez-Jerez was one of nineteen non-citizens prosecuted in the Eastern District of North Carolina for illegally voting in the 2016 election. Following Paez-Jerez's guilty plea, he was sentenced to one year's imprisonment on each charge, to be served concurrently, and three years' probation for each charge, also to be served concurrently. For each charge, he was ordered to pay a $5,500 fine and a $125 special assessment.

North Carolina 2018 Jose Jaime Ramiro-Torres Criminal Conviction Ineligible Voting Case No. 2:18-cr-00029-BO, bit.ly/2JIuCmd, bit.ly/2zlXj3J

Jose Jaime Ramiro-Torres, of El Salvador, pleaded guilty to a charge of illegal voting by an alien. Ramiro-Torres was one of nineteen non-citizens prosecuted in the Eastern District of North Carolina for illegally voting in the 2016 election. He was ordered to pay a $100 fine and a $25 special assessment.

North Carolina 2018 Dieudonne Soifils Criminal Conviction Ineligible Voting Case No. 4:18-cr-00045-FL, bit.ly/2JIuCmd, bit.ly/2zlXj3J

Dieudonne Soifils, of Haiti, pleaded guilty to a charge of illegal voting by an alien. Soifils was one of nineteen non-citizens prosecuted in the Eastern District of North Carolina for illegally voting in the 2016 election. Soifils is awaiting sentencing.

North Carolina 2018 Guadalupe Espinosa-Pena Criminal Conviction Ineligible Voting Case No. 5:18-cr-00298-FL, bit.ly/2JIuCmd, bit.ly/2zlXj3J

Guadalupe Espinosa-Pena, of Mexico, pleaded guilty to one count of voting by an alien. She was one of nineteen non-citizens prosecuted in the Eastern District of North Carolina for illegally voting in the 2016 election. Espinosa-Pena also faced a second charge that she falsely claimed citizenship in order to register to vote, but that charge was dropped as part of a plea agreement. She is awaiting sentencing.

North Carolina 2018 Maria Rufina Castillo-Boswell Criminal Conviction Ineligible Voting Case No. 7:18-cr-00135-D, bit.ly/2JIuCmd, bit.ly/2zlXj3J

Maria Rufina Castillo-Boswell, of the Philippines, pleaded guilty to one count of voting by an alien. She was one of nineteen non-citizens prosecuted in the Eastern District of North Carolina for illegally voting in the 2016 election. Castillo-Boswell also faced a second charge that she falsely claimed citizenship in order to register to vote, but that charge was dropped as part of a plea agreement. She is awaiting sentencing.

North Carolina 2018 Dora Maybe Damata-Rodriguez Criminal Conviction Ineligible Voting Case No. 7:18-cr-00133-FL, bit.ly/2JIuCmd, bit.ly/2zlXj3J

Dora Maybe Damata-Rodriguez, of Panama, pleaded guilty to one count of voting by an alien. She was one of nineteen non-citizens prosecuted in the Eastern District of North Carolina for illegally voting in the 2016 election. Damata-Rodriguez also faced a second charge that she falsely claimed citizenship in order to register to vote, but that charge was dropped as part of a plea agreement. She is awaiting sentencing.

North Carolina 2018 Juan Francisco Landeros-Mireles Criminal Conviction Ineligible Voting Case No. 5:18-cr-00325-D, bit.ly/2JIuCmd, bit.ly/2zlXj3J

Juan Francisco Landeros-Mireles, of Mexico, pleaded guilty to a charge of illegal voting by an alien. Landeros-Mireles was one of nineteen non-citizens prosecuted in the Eastern District of North Carolina for illegally voting in the 2016 election. He is awaiting sentencing.

North Carolina 2018 Hyo Suk George Criminal Conviction Ineligible Voting Case No. 7:18-cr-00138-BO, bit.ly/2JIuCmd, bit.ly/2zlXj3J

Hyo Suk George, of Korea, pleaded guilty to a charge of illegal voting by an alien. George was one of nineteen non-citizens prosecuted in the Eastern District of North Carolina for illegally voting in the 2016 election. He was ordered to pay a $100 fine and a $25 special assessment.

North Carolina 2018 Merious Jean Criminal Conviction Ineligible Voting Case No. 5:18-cr-00327-BO, bit.ly/2JIuCmd, bit.ly/2zlXj3J

Merious Jean, of Haiti, pleaded guilty to a charge of illegal voting by an alien. Jean was one of nineteen non-citizens prosecuted in the Eastern District of North Carolina for illegally voting in the 2016 election. He was ordered to pay a $100 fine and a $25 special assessment.

North Carolina 2018 Daniel Tadeusz Romanowski Criminal Conviction Ineligible Voting Case No. 5:18-cr-00326-D, bit.ly/2JIuCmd, bit.ly/2zlXj3J

Daniel Tadeusz Romanowski, of Poland, pleaded guilty to a charge of illegal voting by an alien. Romanowski was one of nineteen non-citizens prosecuted in the Eastern District of North Carolina for illegally voting in the 2016 election. He is awaiting sentencing.

Tennessee 2018 Betty Best Criminal Conviction Buying Votes on.wbir.com/2YJRz2W, bit.ly/2YGaN9L, bit.ly/33otI7T

Betty Best, of Monroe County, conspired with Brian "Wormy" Hodge to buy votes for Randy White's campaign for Sheriff. White narrowly won the race, but was subsequently removed from the post. The pair paid between $20 and $40 per vote. Both pleaded guilty to conspiracy to buy votes, mainly absentee ballots. Best was sentenced to three years of probation.