Election Fraud Cases

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State Year Name Case Type Fraud Type Details
StateMinnesotaYear2018NameJeffrey SpanierCase TypeCriminal ConvictionFraud TypeIneligible VotingDetails

Jeffrey Spanier was convicted of felony gambling charges in 2014, but still completed a Minnesota voter registration form in November 2016, falsely certifying that he was not a felon. He pleaded guilty to a felony count of registering to vote while ineligible, and was sentenced to four years on probation, with a stay of imposition, and ordered to pay $137 in fees.

StateOklahomaYear2018NameRonald HenryCase TypeCriminal ConvictionFraud TypeFraudulent Use Of Absentee BallotsDetails

Ronald Henry, a 2015 candidate for trustee in Luther, Oklahoma, brought several absentee ballots to be notarized by Mayor Cecilia Taft. It is illegal for a ballot to be notarized without the person signing being present. Ronald Henry entered an Alford plea to the charges and received a five-year deferred sentence.

StateCaliforniaYear2018NameRichard HowardCase TypeCriminal ConvictionFraud TypeBallot Petition FraudDetails

Richard Howard offered homeless people cash and cigarettes in exchange for forging signatures on official petitions using the names and addresses of actual registered voters, in order to qualify several ballot measures. Howard and several others were arrested during an undercover operation. He pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor charge and was sentenced to 60 days in jail and 3 years of probation.

StateColoradoYear2018NameNathan ParksCase TypeCriminal ConvictionFraud TypeDuplicate VotingDetails

Nathan Parks pleaded guilty to voting in both Colorado and Washington in the 2016 election. Parks resided and voted in Washington during the November election, but also maintained his Colorado voter registration and used it to cast an absentee ballot there. After pleading guilty to a misdemeanor charge, Parks was given a 12-month deferred sentence, and was ordered to complete 30 hours of community service and pay courts costs and restitution fees.

StateIllinoisYear2018NameThomas RuddCase TypeCriminal ConvictionFraud TypeBallot Petition FraudDetails

Thomas Rudd, a former coroner in Lake County, Illinois, was charged with five felony counts of perjury for making false statements on nominating petitions for his 2016 re-election. Rudd signed the petitions, falsely indicating he had been personally present when voters signed them, and later made the same claim under oath. Prosecutors alleged that 15-20 petition signatures were falsified, including one in the name of a person who had been dead for over 10 years. The felony charges were dismissed as part of a plea deal, and Rudd pleaded guilty to five misdemeanor charges of disregard of the election code. He was given 24 months of probation, ordered to pay two $5,000 fines, and was barred from public employment for five years.

StateIllinoisYear2018NameEllen MauerCase TypeCriminal ConvictionFraud TypeBallot Petition FraudDetails

During her 2017 campaign for the High School District 128 board, Ellen Mauer signed four nomination petitions to be placed on the ballot as a candidate, falsely claiming she was present when voters signed them. Mauer initially faced felony perjury charges, but a plea deal saw those charges reduced to misdemeanor counts of disregard of the election code. Mauer pleaded guilty and was sentenced to one year of court supervision, and was ordered to complete 75 hours of public service, pay a $750 fine, and make a $250 donation to the Zacharias Sexual Abuse Center.

StateIllinoisYear2018NameDenise ZwitCase TypeCriminal ConvictionFraud TypeBallot Petition FraudDetails

Denise Zwit, assistant to the High School District 128 Superintendant, signed three nomination petitions for school board president Patrick Groody, falsely claiming she was present when voters signed them. Zwit initially faced felony perjury charges, but a plea deal saw those charges reduced to misdemeanor counts of disregard of the election code. Zwit pleaded guilty and was sentenced to one year of court supervision, and was ordered to complete 75 hours of public service, pay a $750 fine, and make a $250 donation to the Zacharias Sexual Abuse Center.

StateMarylandYear2018NameChris StroughCase TypeCriminal ConvictionFraud TypeBallot Petition FraudDetails

Chris Strough and her husband, Queensbury Supervisor John Strough, violated state election law while obtaining signatures on a petition to get John Strough on the Conservative Party primary ballot. John Strough, a Democrat, was required by law to have a notary present for each signature he obtained because he was targeting voters outside of his own party. His wife, a notary public, claimed to have witnessed each signature and read the signer an oath to swear. However, investigators determined she actually remained in the car for many signatures and did not interact with voters. As part of a plea deal, Chris Strough pleaded guilty to disorderly conduct, was fined $200, and gave up her notary license, while charges against John Strough will be dismissed pending six months of good behavior.

StateMinnesotaYear2018NameLarry RekerCase TypeDiversion ProgramFraud TypeDuplicate VotingDetails

Larry Reker, of Worthington, voted twice in a contentious Independent School District 518 bond referendum special election, once in person and once by absentee ballot. Reker pleaded guilty to a felony unlawful voting charge but final adjudication was withheld. He was sentenced to two years of supervised probation and a $500 fine. If he completes the supervised probation, his record will be cleared.

StateMississippiYear2018NameCory Ferreaz Case TypeCriminal ConvictionFraud TypeFalse RegistrationsDetails

Cory Ferreaz, of Hattiesburg, pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor charge of illegally voting outside his legal district. Ferreaz sought to run for state representative for District 102 in 2017. To run, he filed paperwork attesting to having been a resident of Hattiesburg, part of Forrest County, for two years. However, Ferreaz admitted to voting in Lowndes County in 2015 despite not residing there. He was given a six month suspended sentence, and was ordered to pay court costs, a $200 fine, and a $200 assessment to the Crime Victims Compensation Fund.

StateNew HampshireYear2018NameAnonymousCase TypeOfficial FindingFraud TypeFraudulent Use Of Absentee BallotsDetails

A woman filled out her late husband's absentee ballot for the 2016 general election, claiming he had done so prior to his death. She was given a $500 civil penalty. Her case was included in an official report compiled by New Hampshire Secretary of State Bill Gardner and other state election officials, but her name was redacted.

StateNew HampshireYear2018NameAnonymousCase TypeOfficial FindingFraud TypeDuplicate VotingDetails

A man who owned property in both Hampton and Salem voted once in each town. He admitted to investigators that he had done this previously. He was given a $2,500 civil fine and officially warned he faced criminal prosecution if he did it again. His case was included in an official report compiled by New Hampshire Secretary of State Bill Gardner and other state election officials, but his name was redacted.

StateNew HampshireYear2018NameAnonymousCase TypeOfficial FindingFraud TypeFalse RegistrationsDetails

Two individuals voted in 2016 in Dixville Notch's primary, despite not residing or having established a domicile there. They were warned they would face criminal prosecution if they did it again. Their cases were included in an official report compiled by New Hampshire Secretary of State Bill Gardner and other state election officials, but their names were redacted.

StateIllinoisYear2018NameCalvin Borders, Jr.Case TypeCriminal ConvictionFraud TypeFalse RegistrationsDetails

Calvin Borders, Jr., along with his son, daughter, and his son's girlfriend, registered to vote using a vacant lot on Jefferson Street in Brooklyn, Illinois. None of them lived in the city. After an investigation by the Public Corruption Task Force, he pleaded guilty to perjury in violation of the election code and was sentenced to probation with special conditions.

StateIllinoisYear2018NameJesse JohnsonCase TypeCriminal ConvictionFraud TypeDuplicate VotingDetails

Jesse Johnson was convicted of voting twice in the 2016 primary elections, once for a Republican and once for a Democrat. Johnson, who had previously been convicted on weapons and drug charges, was charged with perjury after the St. Clair County Public Corruption Task Force detected his effort to vote twice. Johnson was convicted and, owing to his prior criminal record, was sentenced to two years in Illinois state prison.