Election Fraud Cases

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State Year Name Type of Case Type of Fraud
StateConnecticutYear2018NameTroy StevensonCase TypeCriminal ConvictionFraud TypeFraudulent Use Of Absentee Ballots

Troy Stevenson was convicted of making a false statement on an absentee ballot as well as second degree forgery, both class D felonies. He committed this crime on October 28, 2017, in connection with the November 2017 mayoral election in Stafford. Stevenson was given a three year suspended sentence.

Source: bit.ly/2EXrYKs, bit.ly/2CWpFF5

StateConnecticutYear2018NameBetty ChappellCase TypeCriminal ConvictionFraud TypeFraudulent Use Of Absentee Ballots

Betty Chappell was convicted of making a false statement on an absentee ballot as well as second degree forgery, both class D felonies. She committed this crime on October 28, 2017, in connection with the November 2017 mayoral election in Stafford. Chappell received a five year suspended sentence.

Source: bit.ly/2EXrYKs, bit.ly/2CWpFF5

StateConnecticutYear2015NameChristina AyalaCase TypeCriminal ConvictionFraud TypeFalse Registrations

Former state representative Christina Ayala pleaded guilty to two counts of providing a false statement and was sentenced to a suspended one-year prison term followed by two years of conditional discharge. Ayala had voted in a series of elections, including the 2012 presidential election, in districts in which she did not live. When confronted about residency discrepancies by state investigators, Ayala fabricated evidence to corroborate her false residency claims. Before agreeing to a plea deal, she faced eight counts of fraudulent voting, 10 counts of primary or enrollment violations, and one count of tampering with or fabricating physical evidence. As a condition of her plea deal, she is barred from seeking elected office for two years.

Source: bit.ly/2fEQGlx

StateConnecticutYear2013NameMinnie GonzalezCase TypeCivil PenaltyFraud TypeFraudulent Use Of Absentee Ballots

The State Elections Enforcement Commission ruled that State Rep. Minnie Gonzalez was "knowingly present" while four voters fraudulently filled out absentee ballots at City Hall during the 2006 election. She was fined $4,500 by the Commission. Gonzalez appealed the fine but lost in the state Superior Court.

Source: bit.ly/2fbIQ1Z, bit.ly/2feJ32q

StateConnecticutYear2011NameLydia MartinezCase TypeCivil PenaltyFraud TypeFraudulent Use Of Absentee Ballots

City Councilwoman Lydia Martinez admitted to illegally assisting in the filling out of absentee ballots, as well as encouraging those not eligible to vote absentee to do so. Martinez targeted residents of an assisted living home, Harborview Towers. She was ordered by the Connecticut Elections Enforcement Commission to pay a $500 fine. This was not the first time she was fined by the Commission: In 2008, she was found liable to pay $664 to the Citizens Election Fund for the excess expenditures her campaign committee made for her failed run for the State House.

Source: bit.ly/2tJbYTh, bit.ly/2u9rIkG

StateConnecticutYear2010NameCarlos LopezCase TypeCivil PenaltyFraud TypeFalse Registrations

Carlos Lopez and his wife, Luz Lopez, registered to vote and voted on three separate occasions (2004, 2006, and 2007) in Hartford, where they own a furniture store, while actually living in Farmington. Lopez and his wife were ordered to pay a civil penalty to the Connecticut Elections Enforcement Commission in the amount of $2,000.

Source: bit.ly/2tmjN2r

StateConnecticutYear2010NameLuz LopezCase TypeCivil PenaltyFraud TypeFalse Registrations

Luz Lopez and her husband, Carlos Lopez, registered to vote and voted on three separate occasions (2004, 2006, and 2007) in Hartford, where they own a furniture store, while actually living in Farmington. Lopez and her husband were ordered to pay a civil penalty to the Connecticut Elections Enforcement Commission in the amount of $2,000.

Source: bit.ly/2tmjN2r

StateConnecticutYear2009NameLillian Cummings StevensonCase TypeCivil PenaltyFraud TypeFraudulent Use Of Absentee Ballots

In 2009, Lillian Cummings Stevenson agreed to a consent order after the State Elections Enforcement Commission found her guilty of illegally signing and submitting two absentee ballot request forms on behalf of her sons, who were living in Europe. She was given a $200 fine.

Source: bit.ly/2u4lhzT

StateConnecticutYear2005NamePrenzina HollowayCase TypeCivil PenaltyFraud TypeFraudulent Use Of Absentee Ballots

Prenzina Holloway, of Hartford, Connecticut, voted using another voter's absentee ballot in the 2004 Democratic primary. She was ordered to pay a civil penalty to the Connecticut Elections Enforcement Commission in the amount of $10,000, but she was only required to pay $2,000 because of financial hardship. Ironically, she was later hired by the Hartford Democratic registrar of voters to work in connection with a 2009 municipal election.

Source: bit.ly/2uvxzyi, bit.ly/2uw0EtM

StateConnecticutYear2003NameEva CorriganCase TypeCivil PenaltyFraud TypeFraudulent Use Of Absentee Ballots

Eva Corrigan admitted to failing to co-sign the absentee ballots of those she assisted. She was ordered by the Connecticut Elections Enforcement Commission to pay a $100 civil penalty.

Source: bit.ly/2u4xi8p

StateConnecticutYear2003NameBarnaby HortonCase TypeCivil PenaltyFraud TypeFraudulent Use Of Absentee Ballots

Former state representative Barnaby Horton was charged with absentee ballot fraud after he was caught inducing elderly residents to cast absentee ballots for him. After a lengthy court battle, he pleaded guilty to felony charges of ballot fraud and agreed to pay a $10,000 fine, one of the largest fines ever imposed by the State Elections Enforcement Commission. A Superior Court judge sentenced Horton to two years' probation and ordered to perform 1,000 hours of community service.

Source: bit.ly/2f1uXk9

StateConnecticutYear2002NameHector RiellanoCase TypeCivil PenaltyFraud TypeFraudulent Use Of Absentee Ballots

Hector Riellano admitted to failing to acknowledge assisting someone with the filing of their absentee ballot. He was fined $350 by the Connecticut Elections Enforcement Commission.

Source: bit.ly/2u4xi8p

StateConnecticutYear2002NameDolores ScalesseCase TypeCivil PenaltyFraud TypeBallot Petition Fraud

Dolores Scalesse admitted to violating Connecticut law by falsely claiming she was a witness to all the signatures on a state petition. She entered into a consent agreement with the Connecticut Elections Enforcement Commission and was ordered to pay a $250 civil penalty.

Source: bit.ly/2u4xi8p

StateConnecticutYear2002NameMichael SinghCase TypeCivil PenaltyFraud TypeIneligible Voting

Michael Singh, of Stratford, CT, registered to vote, voted, and eventually was elected to the town council despite the fact that he is not a U.S. citizen. An immigrant from Jamaica, he registered to vote in 1999, ran unsuccessfully for state senate in 2000, and won a seat on the Stratford town council in 2001, where he became majority leader. The Connecticut Elections Enforcement Commission later found that he was not a U.S. citizen and required that he pay $4,000 in fines and resign from his position.

Source: nyti.ms/2rUNmEk, nyti.ms/2rCDakt

StateConnecticutYear2001NameSybil AllenCase TypeCivil PenaltyFraud TypeFraudulent Use Of Absentee Ballots

Sybil Allen, while serving as a Democrat on the Bridgeport Town Committee, engaged in a range of absentee ballot-related fraud. Allen completed ballot applications in the name of residents, forged signatures, and on at least one occasion got a voter to forge a ballot registration form for a family member who no longer lived in the community. Allen also told one voter that a candidate was not on the ballot and watched voters fill out their ballots before taking possession of them. Allen eventually agreed to pay a civil fine of $5,000 and was barred from running for re-election for two years.

Source: bit.ly/2tNpunG

StateConnecticutYear2001NameWarren BluntCase TypeCivil PenaltyFraud TypeFraudulent Use Of Absentee Ballots

Warren Blunt, a city councilman in Bridgeport, pleaded guilty to being present while people cast their absentee ballots and subsequently taking those ballots while running for re-election in the town's Democratic primary. The State of Connecticut Elections Enforcement Commission fined Blunt $2,500 and required him to resign from the town committee. He was also barred from running for elected office again for two years.

Source: bit.ly/2tNpunG

StateConnecticutYear2001NameRonald CavenessCase TypeCivil PenaltyFraud TypeFraudulent Use Of Absentee Ballots

As part of a "get out the vote" campaign leading up to the 2000 election, Ronald Caveness admitted to distributing absentee ballots, being present while people filled them out, and then collecting them. After an investigation by the Connecticut Elections Enforcement Commission, he agreed to resign from the Democratic Town Committee, not seeking re-election for two years, and pay a fine of $4,000, which was eventually reduced to $1,000.

Source: bit.ly/2tNpunG

StateConnecticutYear2001NamePaulette ParkCase TypeCivil PenaltyFraud TypeFraudulent Use Of Absentee Ballots

Paulette Park, while working for a candidate for Bridgeport's 2000 Democratic Town Committee primary election, illegally persuaded voters to list false reasons for requesting absentee ballots, assisted them in applying for absentee ballots, and took possession of the absentee ballots after watching voters fill them out. The State of Connecticut Elections Enforcement Commission fined her $5,000 and banned her from working on future campaigns.

Source: bit.ly/2tNpunG

StateConnecticutYear2000NameGeorge Cabrera, Jr.Case TypeCivil PenaltyFraud TypeFraudulent Use Of Absentee Ballots

George Cabrera, Jr., entered into a settlement with State of Connecticut Election Enforcement Commission. Cabrera admitted to observing a resident fill out an absentee ballot before taking possession of that ballot during the Democratic primary for town council. Cabrera agreed to pay a $750 fine.

Source: bit.ly/2tNpunG

StateConnecticutYear2000NameCarlos ReinosoCase TypeCivil PenaltyFraud TypeIneligible Voting

Carlos Reiniso admitted to voting in the 2000 election, when he was ineligible to do so. After an investigation by the Connecticut Elections Enforcement Commission, he agreed to pay $250 fine.

Source: bit.ly/2tNpunG

StateConnecticutYear1997NameLiz DiazCase TypeCriminal ConvictionFraud TypeFraudulent Use Of Absentee Ballots

Liz Diaz, a former 4th District town committee member in Hartford, pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit election fraud and to witness tampering after she registered ineligible voters to receive absentee ballots and intimidated a witness to lie about her reason for requesting an absentee ballot in a court hearing regarding the 1996 Democratic town committee election. She was sentenced to two months in jail.

Source: bit.ly/2spLC9K, bit.ly/2rCxdV0, bit.ly/2ttdkRq

StateConnecticutYear1997NameVirgen FigueroaCase TypeCriminal ConvictionFraud TypeFraudulent Use Of Absentee Ballots

Virgen Figueroa, a former town committee member from Hartford, pleaded guilty to absentee ballot fraud and forgery. In a plot with several other individuals to elect Democrat candidates for town committee in the 1996 election, Figueroa registered ineligible voters to receive absentee ballots and helped them to mark their ballots. She was sentenced to two months in jail.

Source: bit.ly/2spLC9K, bit.ly/2rCxdV0, bit.ly/2ttdkRq

StateConnecticutYear1996NameEdwin E. GarciaCase TypeCriminal ConvictionFraud TypeFraudulent Use Of Absentee Ballots

Edwin E. Garcia, a former lawmaker and Hartford Police Sergeant, pleaded no contest to three felony counts of absentee ballot fraud, tampering with a witness, and accepting an illegal campaign contribution. Garcia and his campaign workers systematically registered hundreds of young voters and furnished many with absentee ballots that they neither qualified for nor understood. He received a sentence of one year of house arrest.

Source: bit.ly/2fbGd0o

StateConnecticutYear1994NameJacqueline RogersCase TypeCivil PenaltyFraud TypeFraudulent Use Of Absentee Ballots

Jacqueline Rogers was a campaign worker for James Holloway, a candidate for City Council. In the 1993 primary, she was paid $150 to dress up in a nurse's uniform with a certified nurse nametag and solicit "emergency" absentee ballots from patients. She instructed at least one voter to cast her ballot for Holloway. The primary was ultimately decided in Holloway's favor by just nine votes. The Connecticut Elections Enforcement Commission barred her from participating in political campaigns for five years.

Source: bit.ly/2tNpunG

StateConnecticutYear1991NameCurtis MouningCase TypeCivil PenaltyFraud TypeFraudulent Use Of Absentee Ballots

Curtis Mouning, a campaign volunteer for State Representative Mario Testa during the 1990 election, admitted to signing the names of five of his friends and family members to request absentee ballots to vote in the primary. He was ordered to pay a civil penalty to the Connecticut Elections Enforcement Commission in the amount of $500.

Source: bit.ly/2tNpunG

StateConnecticutYear1988NameErnest NewtonCase TypeCriminal ConvictionFraud TypeFraudulent Use Of Absentee Ballots

Ernest Newton, a former state senator, agreed to pay a civil penalty of $1,000 for assisting in filling out someone else's absentee ballot. Newton illegally filled out and mailed an absentee ballot for Ada Crosby. The fraud occurred in the 1988 primary while Newton was a state senate candidate in the 124th District. Following his election, he was imprisoned after accepting a bribe, using campaign contributions for personal expenses, and failing to report improper income on his federal tax return. In 2015, Newton was sentenced to six months' imprisonment for campaign finance violations stemming from having three campaign workers fraudulently sign donation cards in order for the campaign to reach the threshold to qualify for state matching funds.

Source: bit.ly/2oK27sa, cour.at/2pm8u8S, bit.ly/2pmpSKO