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  • Issue Brief posted February 5, 2016 by Walter Lohman Top Five Political-Security Priorities for the Asia–Pacific in 2016

    The Obama Administration’s formulation of American commitments to Asia, the “rebalance” or “pivot,” has had its successes and shortcomings. 2016 should serve as a time for the Obama Administration to deliver as best it can on the unfinished pieces of its Asia policy and thereby set the table for its successor to implement its own energetic formulation. In so doing, the…

  • News Releases on February 3, 2016 Heritage Foundation Names Gleba to Board of Trustees

    WASHINGTON, FEB. 3, 2016—Michael W. Gleba has been elected to serve on The Heritage Foundation’s Board of Trustees. The Washington D.C.-based think tank has been a leading conservative voice in public policy for more than 40 years. Mr. Gleba is Chairman/CEO, Treasurer and Trustee of the Sarah Scaife Foundation, a Pittsburgh-based philanthropic organization supporting…

  • Issue Brief posted February 2, 2016 by Riley Walters The 81st Terrorist Plot Against the U.S. Since 2001

    On January 26, 2016, Samy Mohamed Hamzeh was charged with possession of machine guns and a silencer.[1] According to the criminal complaint, Hamzeh, a 23-year-old Milwaukee resident, was intent on targeting a nearby Masonic temple to show “nobody can play with Muslims.”[2] This is the third Islamist-inspired domestic terrorist plot or attack in 2016 and the 81st since…

  • Issue Brief posted February 2, 2016 by Jason Snead, John-Michael Seibler Purposeless Regulation: The FAA Drone Registry

    Revised and Updated February 4, 2016 Economist Milton Friedman was onto something when he said that “[o]ne of the great mistakes is to judge policies and programs by their intentions rather than their results.”[1] Because of its severe criminal penalties and dubious purpose, the Federal Aviation Administration’s new drone owners’ registry might become a classic example of…

  • Issue Brief posted February 1, 2016 by Brian Slattery Top Five Modernization Priorities for the Coast Guard in 2016

    Congress showed progress in 2015 by helping the Coast Guard reach its modernization requirements, such as the allocation for a ninth National Security Cutter (NSC) and an increase in the overall acquisition, construction, and improvements (AC&I) account over what the Obama Administration requested. Yet the Coast Guard has a long way to go in recapitalizing its forces.…

  • Issue Brief posted January 29, 2016 by Ana Quintana Top Priorities for U.S. Policy Toward Latin America and the Caribbean in 2016

    In 2016, Congress has a unique opportunity to improve America’s foreign policy toward Latin America. For the first time in the 17-year rule of Venezuela’s Socialist Party, the opposition has taken control of the National Assembly. As part of the anticorruption movement sweeping the region, former Guatemalan President Otto Pérez Molina was peacefully forced to resign after…

  • Issue Brief posted January 28, 2016 by David Inserra, Riley Walters 80 Islamist Terrorist Plots: The U.S. Needs to Redouble Its Counterterrorism Efforts

    It is less than a month into 2016, and two terrorist plots have occurred, one foiled and the other successful. Additional information has become available regarding a case from December 2015, resulting in another addition to The Heritage Foundation’s list of terrorist plots and attacks. The FBI’s release of more information in December about the shooting at two…

  • Issue Brief posted January 27, 2016 by James L. Gattuso Binge of Regulation: Wireless Pricing and the FCC

    Wireless data caps, the annoying limits on how much data you can use from your phone, have been a fact of mobile life for several years. Now, a new pricing concept in the wireless marketplace, known as “zero-rating,” promises to relieve consumers of the fear that streaming one too many videos will trigger extra charges. But, instead of receiving plaudits, zero-rating has…

  • Makers of American Political Thought Series posted January 21, 2016 by Matthew J. Franck John Marshall: The Great Chief Justice

    John Marshall, the fourth Chief Justice of the United States, presided over the Supreme Court longer than any other occupant of that chair—34 years (1801–1835). Because the Court was a relatively insignificant legal forum when he arrived and an indispensable institution in American public life by the time he died, Marshall is justly the most celebrated judge in our…

  • News Releases on January 19, 2016 Heritage Foundation Welcomes Beverly Hallberg

    WASHINGTON, Jan. 20, 2016 — Beverly Hallberg, president of District Media Group, has joined The Heritage Foundation as a Visiting Fellow in Communications. She will focus on devising best media practices to promote the think tank’s policy recommendations and provide strategic communications advice to its issue development teams. Heritage Vice President of Communications…

  • Issue Brief posted January 15, 2016 by Joshua Meservey Four U.S. Policy Priorities for Africa in 2016

    There were some positive developments for U.S. interests in Africa in 2015. Nigeria, the continent’s most populous nation and boasting its largest economy, peacefully elected a new president. Congress reaffirmed the U.S.’s commitment to Tunisia, a fledgling democratic ally in the crosshairs of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS). The African Growth and Opportunity…

  • Legal Memorandum posted January 14, 2016 by Paul Larkin, Jordan Richardson, John-Michael Seibler The Supreme Court on Mens Rea: 2008–2015

    Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., was on to something when he said that even a dog knows the difference between “being stumbled over and being kicked.”[1] Anglo–American criminal law traditionally has marked a person as a criminal only if he or she[2] committed a morally blameworthy act, known as the actus reus, along with an “evil” frame of mind, known as mens rea or…

  • Issue Brief posted January 14, 2016 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Top 10 Areas for Congressional Action on the Arms Trade Treaty in 2016

    The Arms Trade Treaty (ATT), which Congress has rightly opposed, entered into force on December 24, 2014. The U.S. signed the ATT on September 25, 2013, but the Administration has yet to transmit the treaty to the Senate. The first Conference of States Parties (CSP) to the ATT was held in Cancun, Mexico, on August 24–27, 2015. The CSP set out the rules of procedure for…

  • Backgrounder posted January 12, 2016 by Don Palmer Faulty Data Fuel Challenges to Voter ID Laws

    Obtaining accurate statistics regarding voters is incredibly important because the courts rely on them in analyzing the legal issues and assessing the validity of a photo identification requirement. Election administrators also need accurate data to allocate resources for issuing free voter photo IDs. Policymakers need accurate data to formulate sound legislative…

  • Backgrounder posted January 12, 2016 by Olivia Enos, Bruce Klingner Next Steps for Human Rights in North Korea

    After the release of the report of the United Nations commission of inquiry on human rights in North Korea (COI) in February 2014, the world can no longer deny the severity of Pyongyang’s human rights crisis. The horrific tales of abuse and sheer magnitude of “systematic, widespread and grave violations of human rights” led the U.N. to conclude that North Korea was guilty…