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  • Special Report posted April 24, 2015 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D., Charlotte Florance, Daniel J Kaniewski The Ebola Outbreak of 2013–2014: An Assessment of U.S. Actions

    The task force chairmen, steering committee members, and participants remind readers of this report that the affiliations of the contributors are listed only for identification and that they do not imply institutional endorsement. Contributors to this report do not necessarily represent their institutions, and every member of the task force does not necessarily endorse…

  • Issue Brief posted April 23, 2015 by Jamie Bryan Hall The Research on Same-Sex Parenting: “No Differences” No More

    In its 2004 endorsement of what is commonly referred to as the “no differences” theory, the American Psychological Association (APA) declared that “there is no scientific evidence that parenting effectiveness is related to parental sexual orientation: lesbian and gay parents are as likely as heterosexual parents to provide supportive and healthy environments for their…

  • Issue Brief posted April 22, 2015 by David Inserra, James Phillips 67 Islamist Terrorist Plots Since 9/11: Spike in Plots Inspired by Terrorist Groups, Unrest in Middle East

    In late February, Abdirahman Sheik Mohamud, a naturalized U.S. citizen born in Somalia, was arrested in Ohio and charged with various terrorist activities. Last week, news came that a Federal Grand Jury had indicted Mohamud on additional federal charges, including providing material support to terrorists and making a false statement involving international terrorism. With…

  • Legal Memorandum posted April 21, 2015 by Paul Larkin The Constitutional Problems Raised by Domestic Convictions for Foreign Crimes

    Most federal criminal legislation is designed to regulate domestic affairs.[1] Over the past few decades, however, Congress has increasingly adopted several laws that apply beyond our shores. One example is the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, which makes it a crime to bribe a foreign official, a crime that can occur overseas. In those cases, Congress has clearly defined…

  • Issue Brief posted April 20, 2015 by Ryan T. Anderson, Ph.D. Physician-Assisted Suicide Corrupts the Practice of Medicine

    Allowing physician-assisted suicide (PAS) would be a grave mistake for four reasons, as explained in a Heritage Foundation Backgrounder, “Always Care, Never Kill.”[1] First, it would endanger the weak and vulnerable. Second, it would corrupt the practice of medicine and the doctor–patient relationship. Third, it would compromise the family and intergenerational…

  • Legal Memorandum posted April 20, 2015 by John Malcolm Civil Asset Forfeiture: Good Intentions Gone Awry and the Need for Reform

    The chairmen of the Senate and House Judiciary Committees have stated that reforming federal civil asset forfeiture laws is a top priority for them.[1] The Department of Justice’s Office of the Inspector General (DOJ IG) has issued several critical reports on how some federal agencies and state and local authorities administer their forfeiture programs.[2] And Attorney…

  • Issue Brief posted April 20, 2015 by David Inserra Revisiting Efforts to Counter Violent Extremism: Leadership Needed

    Several months ago, President Obama announced that the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) would provide work authorization and protection from deportation to as many as 5 million unlawful immigrants. In government, senior leadership focuses on two or three issues at a time at most. The Obama Administration’s immigration action, given its massive scope and controversial…

  • Backgrounder posted April 20, 2015 by Bruce Klingner Respond Cautiously to North Korean Engagement Offers

    In what is now something of an annual rite on the Korean Peninsula, 2015 dawned with perceived signals of North Korea’s supposed desire to resurrect diplomatic ties with the United States and South Korea. Although these signals were met with predictions of another inter-Korean summit, Pyongyang’s offer to refrain from nuclear tests in return for a freeze on allied…

  • First Principles Series Report posted April 20, 2015 by Carson Holloway Alexander Hamilton and American Progressivism

    Was Alexander Hamilton, one of the most consequential of the American Founders, actually an early version of a modern progressive? One could entertain such a suspicion on the basis of some of today’s political discourse. On the right, certain libertarians and limited-government conservatives dismiss Hamilton as a prophet of big government, the odd man out in a Founding…

  • Issue Brief posted April 17, 2015 by Brian Slattery Congress Should Continue Momentum on Coast Guard Cutter Fleet

    Seasonal Arctic operations, need for presence and engagement in Southeast Asia, and declining availability of U.S. Navy assets for joint operations are a few examples of the Coast Guard’s increasing mission requirements. As such, the need to meet their modernization goals is growing more urgent. The Coast Guard budget request for fiscal year (FY) 2016 shows some promise…

  • Issue Brief posted April 17, 2015 by Steven P. Bucci, Ph.D., Brian Slattery, Emil Maine Progress Is Coming on Defense Acquisition Reform

    On March 23, Representative Mac Thornberry (R–TX), Chairman of the House Armed Services Committee (HASC), announced his defense reform proposal.[1] As anticipated, the proposal is a long-term effort primarily focused on reducing wasteful spending and eliminating cumbersome bureaucratic obstacles.[2] The HASC Chairman’s approach is realistic and effective and would be a…

  • Issue Brief posted April 16, 2015 by Steven Groves U.N. Conference Debating a Ban on Autonomous Weapons: Understanding Key Issues

    This week, a ban on lethal autonomous weapons systems (LAWS) is being debated at the Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons (CCW) in Geneva. The U.S. delegation has been non-committal on such a ban, and U.S. policy currently permits the Department of Defense (DOD) to pursue the development of LAWS in a responsible manner. At the conference, the United States should…

  • Issue Brief posted April 16, 2015 by David Inserra, Charles "Cully" Stimson Three Terrorist Plots Disrupted in Three Weeks: 66th Islamist Plot Reconfirms Scope of Threat

    On Friday, April 10, the FBI Joint Terrorism Task Force (JTTF) in Topeka, Kansas, arrested John T. Booker Jr., as he prepared a car bomb for use against the nearby Fort Riley Army post. Booker, a 20-year-old U.S. citizen who goes by the name Mohammed Abdullah Hassan, expressed a desire to support the Islamic State by engaging in violent jihad here in the U.S.[1] Through…

  • Issue Brief posted April 16, 2015 by Michaela Dodge, Steven Groves, James Phillips Senate’s Iran Nuclear Bill Misses the Point

    Two days ago, the Senate Foreign Relations Committee (SFRC) unanimously passed the Iran Nuclear Agreement Review Act of 2015, a bill that attempts to bolster the congressional role in the Obama Administration’s negotiations on the Iranian nuclear program. While the effort is well intentioned, the bill sets up Congress to allow the Administration to act as if it had…

  • Issue Brief posted April 15, 2015 by David Inserra Time to Reform the U.S. Counterterrorism Enterprise—Now

    Several months ago, President Obama announced that the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) would provide work authorization and protection from deportation to as many as 5 million unlawful immigrants. While The Heritage Foundation has written extensively on the harm done to the U.S. immigration system and the rule of law, another serious side effect of Obama’s executive…