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  • News Releases posted May 27, 2016 by Harold Kazianis Breaking Down President Obama’s Speech at Hiroshima

    Bruce Klingner, who specializes in Korean and Japanese affairs as the senior research fellow for Northeast Asia at The Heritage Foundation's Asian Studies Center, gives his take on Obama’s speech at Hiroshima: “President Obama’s speech at Hiroshima was a poignant discourse on the horrors of war. But his remarks reflect an aloof view disdainful of all violence, lumping…

  • Issue Brief posted May 26, 2016 by Ana Quintana Alleviating the Humanitarian Crisis in Venezuela

    In recent months, the already dire situation in Venezuela has worsened. Socialist economic policies have led to food shortages, electricity blackouts, and runaway inflation. Criminal elements have taken over the government and imprisoned democratic opposition figures. All the while, a citizen security crisis has caused the Venezuelan capital, Caracas, to become the…

  • Issue Brief posted May 26, 2016 by Rachel Sheffield, Daren Bakst Child Nutrition Reauthorization: Time for Serious Reform, Not Tinkering

    Congress is currently working on reauthorizing the federal child nutrition programs, which include school meal programs. The last time Congress reauthorized these programs, it passed the controversial Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010,[1] a major priority for President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama.[2] The Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act made a number of…

  • News Releases posted May 24, 2016 by Sarah Mills Facebook Needs to Live Up to Its Promise to Be a Platform for All Ideas

    On Monday, Facebook responded to an inquiry from Senate Commerce Chairman John Thune, R-S.D., following allegations that the social media giant exhibited anti-conservative bias in its handling of news content. "Facebook's decision to provide greater transparency is helpful, but it can't stop here,"  said Rob Bluey, vice president of publishing at The Heritage Foundation,…

  • News Releases posted May 24, 2016 by Justin Posey Senate Ponders Reeling In Catfish Inspection Program

    The Senate could vote as early as today on a joint resolution disapproving the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) rule on catfish inspections. Heritage Foundation agriculture policy expert Daren Bakst called the program “a poster child for cronyism and government waste.” According to the Foundation’s Budget Book, published earlier this year, getting rid of the…

  • News Releases posted May 24, 2016 by Daniel Woltornist TSA Should Expand Privatization of Security at Airports

    Burgeoning wait lines at TSA checkpoints have some airports advising flyers to arrive three hours before their departure. Heritage Foundation researcher Riley Walters says it doesn’t have to be this way. “Many factors have contributed to the long lines, but the solutions are quite simple,” Walters says. “For starters, the TSA can expand privatization of security at…

  • Backgrounder posted May 23, 2016 by James L. Gattuso, Diane Katz Red Tape Rising 2016: Obama Regs Top $100 Billion Annually

    The number and cost of federal regulations increased substantially in 2015, as regulators continued to tighten restrictions on American businesses and individuals. The addition of 43 new major rules last year increased annual regulatory costs by more than $22 billion, bringing the total annual costs of Obama Administration rules to an astonishing $100 billon-plus in just…

  • News Releases posted May 23, 2016 by Justin Posey Obama Era Regulations Now Top $100 Billion Annually

    “An unparalleled expansion of the regulatory state.” That’s how Heritage Foundation analysts Diane Katz and James Gattuso describe President Obama’s regulatory record in a new report released today. The report, “Red Tape Rising, 2016,” documents that the Obama Administration since 2009 has increased regulatory costs by $108 billion a year, adding 229 new major…

  • Issue Brief posted May 23, 2016 by Justin Bogie, Daren Bakst, Nicolas Loris, Katie Tubb House Energy and Water Appropriations Bill: Makes Progress but Could Do More to Cut Spending

    This week, the Energy and Water appropriations bill is expected to be debated on the House floor. The second of 12 appropriations bills providing discretionary funding for the federal government, the bill provides funding for projects under the direction of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Reclamation, the Department of Energy,…

  • Issue Brief posted May 20, 2016 by Daren Bakst Federal and State Governments Should Not Require Mandatory Labeling of Genetically Engineered Food

    Genetically engineered food is widely used by food companies in their products. Genetic engineering involves an intentional and targeted change to an organism’s gene sequence or genetic makeup to give the organism a specific new trait.[1] This process can improve the quality and quantity of food. For example, such activity can generate pest-resistant crops or crops that…

  • News Releases posted May 20, 2016 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. What is "Brexit" and Why Does it Matter?

    On June 23, Great Britain will vote in a nationwide referendum to decide if it wants to remain part of the European Union. If Britain exits – Brexit – it will remain a member of NATO, but it will recover the freedom to make its own trade agreements and write its own laws. President Obama believes that it’s in the interests of the U.S. that Britain stay in the European…

  • News Releases posted May 20, 2016 by Justin Posey Revised Puerto Rico Bill Leaves Much to be Desired

    House leaders yesterday introduced a revised bill to help Puerto Rico deal with its debilitating mountain of debt. While the revised bill had the blessing of House leaders from both parties, experts at The Heritage Foundation were not impressed. “The bill still contains an unprecedented legal stay, suspending creditors rights to access the courts and allowing President…

  • Issue Brief posted May 19, 2016 by Jason Snead, John-Michael Seibler Seizing the Sky: Federal Regulators Use Drones to Justify Controlling the Airspace Over Your Backyard

    As the availability of small, recreational, mass-market drones has expanded, so too have attempts by officials at the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to stake an exclusive regulatory claim in the drone space. In December 2015, at the same time the FAA was rushing its unprecedented drone-owners’ registry into effect,[1] the agency issued a “Fact Sheet” restating its…

  • Issue Brief posted May 19, 2016 by James Sherk California’s Unprecedented Minimum Wage Increase Will Hurt Vulnerable Workers

    The California legislature has passed an unprecedented statewide minimum wage hike. By 2023, the minimum wage across California will be $15 an hour. Adjusted for inflation, this will be higher than any statewide minimum wage in U.S. history. It will also be higher than the national minimum wage of any country in the world. The real increase will be even greater in inland…

  • News Releases posted May 19, 2016 by Sarah Mills Facebook Meeting Should Be 'The Start, Not the End' of Conservative Outreach

    Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg met with 16 conservative leaders Wednesday over allegations of liberal bias on the part the social media giant.  Heritage Foundation President Jim DeMint and Vice President of Publishing Rob Bluey were among those participating. “Mark Zuckerberg reaffirmed his commitment to give everyone a voice on Facebook,” said Bluey after the meeting.…