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  • Lecture posted March 14, 2014 by The Honorable Ted Cruz Does the Treaty Power Threaten Our System of Limited Government?

    Let me say at the outset, it is a particular privilege being here at Heritage. Heritage plays such an important role in helping articulate and defend conservative principles across this country, and in no fight has that been more apparent than in the fight over stopping the enormous harms that are coming from Obamacare. Heritage has played an absolutely leading role in…

  • Lecture posted March 6, 2014 by Kim R. Holmes, Ph.D. Is Ukraine a Watershed?

    I’d like to offer some preliminary observations on the implications of the Ukrainian crisis for American foreign policy—specifically on perceptions of President Obama’s national strategy and his handling of foreign policy. We may have reached a watershed in the post–Iraq War era. For years now, we’ve been traumatized by the aftermath of the Iraq War. Barack Obama’s…

  • Lecture on February 13, 2014 The Prospect for Freedom: Can the U.S. Sustain Its Experiment in Self-Government?

    Some years ago, I was in China at one of the major universities and speaking to a forum of Chinese CEOs. After the final banquet, I walked back to the lecture hall with the dean of the business school. “Let me ask you a question I wouldn’t ask in public,” he said. “What am I missing? We in China are fascinated with the Christian roots of your Western past—for the sake of…

  • Lecture posted February 3, 2014 by Diarmuid F. O'Scannlain Joseph Story, the Natural Law, and Modern Jurisprudence

    It is a singular honor to be delivering the Joseph Story Distinguished Lecture at The Heritage Foundation, and Ed Meese’s presence here tonight makes this honor all the more meaningful.[1] For those of us who believe that judges are required to enforce the original meaning of the Constitution, General Meese is a real hero. Not only was Ed instrumental in the appointment…

  • Lecture posted January 7, 2014 by Mike Lee Defending the Senate’s Constitutional Duty to Advise and Consent to Presidential Appointments

    I’m very grateful for the opportunity to speak about the Recess Appointments Clause today. In the small town of Alpine, Utah, where I live, we speak of little else. It is of great interest to those of us who watch the Supreme Court to see this case get teed up. I was very happy, of course, when the Supreme Court of the United States granted certiorari to review this…

  • Lecture posted December 11, 2013 by Robin Harris, D. Phil. Not for Turning: The Life of Margaret Thatcher

    Thank you all for coming. Thank you very much to the Heritage Foundation for hosting and organizing this event. A particular thank you to Ed Feulner and Heritage for tolerating me for the last five years or so—an occasionally visiting Brit who loves America and loves Heritage. Mrs. Thatcher made many good decisions, but one of the best was to become patron of The…

  • Lecture posted October 15, 2013 by Cristián Larroulet Chile’s Path to Development: Key Reforms to Become the First Developed Country in Latin America

    Finding the best path to lead Chile toward economic development has been a continuous task of Chilean governments and leaders during the last century. The mission of building a society of opportunities—where each person has the chance to reach personal fulfillment, and can live with dignity and without poverty—seems now closer than ever before. After a period of economic…

  • Lecture posted September 18, 2013 by Kenneth L. Wainstein The Changing Nature of Terror: Law and Policies to Protect America

    I want to thank The Heritage Foundation and Senior Legal Fellow Cully Stimson for having me here today. I was thinking back as I was preparing for these remarks, and it occurred to me that this is the fourth time I’ve spoken about terrorism at a Heritage event over the past five years. It’s been a pleasure to speak at Heritage on each of those occasions, but today it’s a…

  • Lecture posted July 18, 2013 by Hans A. von Spakovsky Requiring Photographic Identification by Voters in North Carolina

    Protecting the Integrity of Elections Guaranteeing the integrity of elections requires having security throughout the entire election process, from voter registration to the casting of votes to the counting of ballots after the polls have closed. For example, jurisdictions that use paper ballots seal their ballot boxes when all of the ballots have been deposited, and…

  • Lecture posted July 15, 2013 by Luke Coffey The Future of U.S. Bases in Europe: A View from America

    I would first like to thank James Corum and his team here at the Baltic Defense College for putting together this interesting panel and for inviting me to speak here today. It is an honor to be able to address such an esteemed audience on an issue that is of such importance: the future of U.S. forces in Europe. This is an issue that often gets overlooked in the larger…

  • Lecture posted July 2, 2013 by Jim DeMint Britain and the U.S.: Two Peoples United by an Attachment to Self-Determination

    I would like to thank the Henry Jackson Society, not just for this event today, but for the very important work you do on transatlantic relations and security concerns. You stand up for freedom around the world, and I salute you for that. I would like to say one word about the man after whom you’re named. Scoop Jackson was the kind of Democrat I wish we had more of today.…

  • Lecture posted June 25, 2013 by Joseph Postell, Ph.D., Robert E. Moffit, Ph.D., Todd F. Gaziano How to Limit Government in the Age of Obama

    The Role of Congress Joseph Postell, PhD: Limiting government in the age of Obama is a tall order, but it is a tall order not simply because of who occupies the White House. It is a tall order because it requires limiting government in the age of the administrative state, which stacks the deck against those hoping to place limits on government. To mount an effective…

  • Lecture posted June 4, 2013 by Walter Lohman Honoring America’s Superpower Responsibilities

    Thank you for having me here today. I have to say, at first, it sounded like a setup. Lewis & Clark College has quite a reputation as a liberal institution. But the director of the symposium, Professor Bob Mandel, speaks so sincerely about his interest in developing diversity of opinion, I’m starting to believe it. I spent some time today with students touring the campus.…

  • Lecture posted June 4, 2013 by Charles Moore United States of … America or Europe?

    Edwin J. Feulner: Thank you for being here. This is the eighth Margaret Thatcher lecture at The Heritage Foundation. Our previous distinguished speakers have included former Australian Prime Minister John Howard, human rights champion and Soviet dissident Natan Sharansky, and leading free-market economist Hernando de Soto. The purpose of the lecture series is to advance…

  • Lecture posted May 29, 2013 by The Honorable Dr. István Stumpf, Mila Versteeg, Ronald D. Rotunda, Jeremy Rabkin Model, Resource, or Outlier? What Effect Has the U.S. Constitution Had on the Recently Adopted Constitutions of Other Nations?

    The Birth of the New Fundamental Law of Hungary Dr. István Stumpf: I would like first to thank The Heritage Foundation for inviting me to this panel discussion on a very important topic. I would also like to say a special “thank you” to Attorney General Ed Meese, who experienced the Hungarian constitution-making environment firsthand last summer when Hungary inaugurated a…