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  • Lecture posted November 23, 2016 by Mike Gonzalez Multiculturalism and the Fight for America’s National Identity

    2016 has been the year of national identity, not just in America, but throughout the industrialized West. Political entrepreneurs who have recognized the salience of this issue have experienced success—on the right and the left and on both sides of the Atlantic. In fact, many of our most insightful public intellectuals, from Samuel Huntington on the right to Arthur…

  • Lecture posted October 27, 2016 by The Honorable Mike Rogers The Strategic Value of Intelligence to Confront 21st-Century Threats

    Thank you to The Heritage Foundation for inviting me to speak at this symposium on the role of intelligence.[1] When I was the Chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, we assembled some of the most able national security people in this town and in this country. Any success that I had was due, in part, to my staff director and the able team that he put together. I…

  • Lecture posted September 1, 2016 by Mike Lee Recovering the Senate’s Rightful Role in Foreign Affairs

    I’m honored to be here today to talk about the new climate-change deal President Obama is pursuing, the dangers it poses to the American energy sector and to U.S. sovereignty, and what Congress can and should do about it. Conference of Parties In a few weeks Paris will host the latest round of climate-change negotiations—what’s called the “Conference of Parties”—under…

  • Lecture posted August 12, 2016 by Lee Edwards, Ph.D., Edwin Meese III, Alan Charles Kors, George Weigel Pursuing Freedom and Democracy: Lessons from the Fall of the Berlin Wall

    Introduction The Cold War was the most protracted and unconventional conflict of the 20th century. World War I and World War II were great sweeping wars that shaped our history and our world, but they didn’t match the length or the complexity of the ideological and strategic struggle that occupied superpowers and lesser powers on every continent for more than four…

  • Lecture posted August 4, 2016 by Noel J. Francisco A Law Clerk’s Reflections on Justice Scalia

    It’s a great honor to talk to you today about the legacy of my hero and my boss, the late Justice Antonin Scalia, who I had the deep privilege and honor to clerk for during the 1997 term. My remarks are going to be pretty simple. I’m going to tell a couple stories. I’m going to read some lengthy quotes from Justice Scalia’s opinions because what better way to remember…

  • Lecture posted July 7, 2016 by Franklin L. Lavin Thinking Seriously About China

    Thank you to Ed Feulner for the kind introduction, and let me also thank The Heritage Foundation for hosting me today. I have had the privilege of serving on the Advisory Council of Heritage’s Asian Studies Center for a number of years, and I am grateful for the good work it does. We are here today to discuss U.S.–China relations, and the title of my speech was selected…

  • Lecture posted February 19, 2016 by Stephen F. Hayes, James Ceaser, Ph.D., Michael A. Needham A New Era in Conservative Politics: The Tea Party’s Lasting Influence

    The Tea Party: Movement or Mood? In the spring of 2012, I had a conversation with a top advisor to Mitt Romney. He and I were delayed at an airport and discussed whether the Tea Party is a mood or a movement. The more beers we had, the more heated the discussion became, and I argued that the Tea Party is in fact a movement. His argument was that the Tea Party is just a…

  • Lecture posted February 1, 2016 by Daniel Hannan, A. E. Dick Howard The Enduring Legacy of Magna Carta

    Daniel Hannan: Let me take you back to another summer’s day in August 1647 in London—a tense and frightened city. The second phase of the English Civil War had just come to an end, resulting in victory for supporters of parliamentary supremacy over supporters of monarchical absolutism. The troops of the New Model Army, mainly Calvinists, were marching angry and unpaid on…

  • Lecture posted February 1, 2016 by The Honorable Carlos T. Bea Who Should Interpret Our Statutes and How It Affects Our Separation of Powers

    The interpretation of statutes is so often decisive in cases of national importance, which touch all our lives. Specifically, I want to talk with you about how courts are relinquishing the power to interpret Congress’s statutes through deference to executive agency interpretations. This undermines our system of separation of powers. It tends to decrease the powers of…

  • Lecture posted January 21, 2016 by John Malcolm Persistent Forensics Lab Problems Undermine Faith in Our Criminal Justice System

    Judge Alex Kozinski of the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit has done a real service to the bar through his Georgetown Law Journal article “Criminal Law 2.0.”[1] As is typical of Judge Kozinski’s writings, it is clear, articulate, insightful, and provocative. In that article, he says, “there are disturbing indications that a non-trivial number of…

  • Lecture posted January 21, 2016 by Dean Cheng Prospects for Extended Deterrence in Space and Cyber: The Case of the PRC

    While there has been discussion about whether today’s security environment constitutes a “neo-Cold War,” the reality is that it is actually more complex than the Cold War. For most of the period between 1947 and 1992, the situation was largely marked by a bipolar balance, where the two major players created somewhat symmetrical blocs of allies, friends, and client states.…

  • Lecture posted December 21, 2015 by Mark B. Schneider Nuclear Deterrence in the Context of the European Security Crisis and Beyond

    Legacy Soviet attitudes toward the West have always shaped Russian foreign and defense policy. Vladimir Putin replaced Boris Yeltsin’s stance that Russia had no enemies with the rather paranoid view that the U.S., NATO, and Japan are Russia’s enemies and that the U.S. is seeking the destruction of Russia.[1] Putin has characterized the collapse of the Soviet Union as “the…

  • Lecture posted December 8, 2015 by Roger Scruton The Future of European Civilization: Lessons for America

    In a gloomy but strangely enthralling book published at the end of the First World War, the historian and polymath Oswald Spengler wrote of the decline of the West, arguing that Europe was moving inevitably to its end according to a pattern that can be observed among civilizations from the beginning of recorded history. Each historical superorganism, he argued, displays…

  • Lecture posted December 2, 2015 by Andrew Grossman Evenwel v. Abbott: What Does One Person, One Vote Really Mean?

    Evenwel v. Abbott may prove to be the most consequential case of the coming Supreme Court term due to its possible electoral impact, but as a legal matter—which is what I’m here to discuss—there’s not much room for controversy or consequence. The meaning of the one-person, one-vote (OPOV) rule is one of the great open questions in election law. At least, that’s what…

  • Lecture posted August 11, 2015 by James Talent U.S. National Security and Rising China

    The 2014 B. C. Lee Lecture Delivered Monday, December 8, 2014 THE HONORABLE JIM DEMINT: This is a special event at Heritage, the annual B.C. Lee Lecture. The B.C. Lee Lecture is named for the founder of Samsung, a man of real vision for the U.S.–Korean alliance and South Korea’s role in the world. He was a remarkable entrepreneur and leader. I had the pleasure of meeting…