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  • Lecture posted August 12, 2014 by Kim R. Holmes, Ph.D. The Great Divide: The Ideological Legacies of the American and French Revolutions

    Kim R. Holmes, PhD Let me take you back to 225 years ago to what were then the suburbs of Paris. An angry crowd gathered outside an old fortress in search of arms and gunpowder. The Bastille was nearly empty. There were only seven inmates, old men who reportedly were annoyed by all the noise outside their cells: four forgers, two “lunatics,” and a so-called deviant…

  • Lecture posted July 17, 2014 by A. B. Lowther, PhD A Strategy for American Renewal

    Historian Paul Johnson opens A History of the American People with, “The creation of the United States of America is the greatest of all human adventures. No other national story holds such tremendous lessons, for the American people themselves and for the rest of mankind.”[1] While many Americans may see Johnson’s words as an example of a mythical “American…

  • Lecture posted July 8, 2014 by Jim DeMint Conserving the Promise of Freedom in Asia

    L‌et me start by thanking the Sasakawa Peace Foundation, and Mr.‌ ‌Takagi in particular, for inviting me to Tokyo. I am very pleased to be here. As was mentioned, this is my first trip. It is my purpose today to offer you an American conservative vision of the values of free markets and free peoples that bind the U.S. and our allies and how these values shape American…

  • Lecture posted June 11, 2014 by Barry C. Black Bridging the Religious and Secular Divide

    Bret Bernhardt: It’s a real joy and honor to be here today, along with Senator DeMint, to introduce Chaplain Barry Black. Having served in the Senate as a chief of staff to Senator DeMint, I can tell you that Chaplain Black stands in a unique position in the Senate, which is indeed a secular institution. As we look at the topic for today, bridging the religious and…

  • Lecture posted May 22, 2014 by Adam J. White Congress and the New Administrative State

    The administrative state begins with Congress. As the Supreme Court has observed, “an agency literally has no power to act…unless and until Congress confers power upon it.”[1] So let me offer a few words about what previous Congresses have done to create the new administrative state and what Congress can do, today and tomorrow, to restore some limits. Delegating Powers…

  • Lecture posted May 15, 2014 by Michaela Dodge The U.S. Missile Defense Program: An Opportunity for Canadian International Leadership

    Thank you for the opportunity to testify on the vitally important subject of the importance of ballistic missile defense in the current security environment and on the benefits of ballistic missile defense cooperation between Canada and the United States. I would like to concentrate on the key issues that, in my judgment, the Canadian government should consider with…

  • Lecture posted April 29, 2014 by General Barry R. McCaffrey, USA (Ret.) National Security in an Uncertain Age

    General Barry R. McCaffrey, USA (Ret.) Brigadier General Thomas V. Draude: It is a real honor and pleasure to be with you today to co-host this most worthwhile endeavor with The Heritage Foundation. We’re just delighted. Basically, our foundation provides resources to enhance and enrich professional military education and leadership to those attending the Marine Corps…

  • Lecture posted April 28, 2014 by Ryan T. Anderson A New Time for Choosing on Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness: Today’s Challenges to the Principles of Ronald Reagan’s Conservative Manifesto

    Ryan T. Anderson The more things change, the more they stay the same. Rereading “A Time for Choosing,” it is amazing to see just how much things haven’t changed. Ronald Reagan expresses concern that government taxes too much of our incomes, that government spends more than it raises, that government is transforming into a welfare state that’s trapping the poor, that…

  • Lecture posted March 14, 2014 by The Honorable Ted Cruz Does the Treaty Power Threaten Our System of Limited Government?

    Let me say at the outset, it is a particular privilege being here at Heritage. Heritage plays such an important role in helping articulate and defend conservative principles across this country, and in no fight has that been more apparent than in the fight over stopping the enormous harms that are coming from Obamacare. Heritage has played an absolutely leading role in…

  • Lecture posted March 6, 2014 by Kim R. Holmes, Ph.D. Is Ukraine a Watershed?

    I’d like to offer some preliminary observations on the implications of the Ukrainian crisis for American foreign policy—specifically on perceptions of President Obama’s national strategy and his handling of foreign policy. We may have reached a watershed in the post–Iraq War era. For years now, we’ve been traumatized by the aftermath of the Iraq War. Barack Obama’s…

  • Lecture on February 13, 2014 The Prospect for Freedom: Can the U.S. Sustain Its Experiment in Self-Government?

    Some years ago, I was in China at one of the major universities and speaking to a forum of Chinese CEOs. After the final banquet, I walked back to the lecture hall with the dean of the business school. “Let me ask you a question I wouldn’t ask in public,” he said. “What am I missing? We in China are fascinated with the Christian roots of your Western past—for the sake of…

  • Lecture posted February 3, 2014 by Diarmuid F. O'Scannlain Joseph Story, the Natural Law, and Modern Jurisprudence

    It is a singular honor to be delivering the Joseph Story Distinguished Lecture at The Heritage Foundation, and Ed Meese’s presence here tonight makes this honor all the more meaningful.[1] For those of us who believe that judges are required to enforce the original meaning of the Constitution, General Meese is a real hero. Not only was Ed instrumental in the appointment…

  • Lecture posted January 7, 2014 by Mike Lee Defending the Senate’s Constitutional Duty to Advise and Consent to Presidential Appointments

    I’m very grateful for the opportunity to speak about the Recess Appointments Clause today. In the small town of Alpine, Utah, where I live, we speak of little else. It is of great interest to those of us who watch the Supreme Court to see this case get teed up. I was very happy, of course, when the Supreme Court of the United States granted certiorari to review this…

  • Lecture posted December 11, 2013 by Robin Harris, D. Phil. Not for Turning: The Life of Margaret Thatcher

    Thank you all for coming. Thank you very much to the Heritage Foundation for hosting and organizing this event. A particular thank you to Ed Feulner and Heritage for tolerating me for the last five years or so—an occasionally visiting Brit who loves America and loves Heritage. Mrs. Thatcher made many good decisions, but one of the best was to become patron of The…

  • Lecture posted October 15, 2013 by Cristián Larroulet Chile’s Path to Development: Key Reforms to Become the First Developed Country in Latin America

    Finding the best path to lead Chile toward economic development has been a continuous task of Chilean governments and leaders during the last century. The mission of building a society of opportunities—where each person has the chance to reach personal fulfillment, and can live with dignity and without poverty—seems now closer than ever before. After a period of economic…