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  • Commentary posted August 31, 2015 by William T. Wilson, Ph.D. Easier Path To Recovery Chosen By Beijing Has Hard Landing

    In mid-June, China's Shanghai Composite Index was up a dazzling 60% since the beginning of the year. It was the highest level in more than six years. Some took it as a sign that the recent weakness in China's economy would be short-lived. Yet only a little more than two months later, and the index had lost all its gains since the first of the year. Many small domestic…

  • Commentary posted August 31, 2015 by James Phillips The Iran nuclear deal: Peeling back the layers

    "This thing is like an onion," George Costanza once said on an episode of "Seinfeld." "The more layers you peel, the more it stinks." Just about anyone who examines the Iran nuclear deal knows how he feels. Look at the recent bombshell report that revealed Iran will be allowed to use its own officials to investigate a military site where it's suspected of conducting…

  • Commentary posted August 28, 2015 by Norbert J. Michel, Ph.D. Market Swing No Cause for Fed Action, or Non-Action

    Back in grad school (not all that long ago), we pondered whether a central bank should target equity (or other asset) prices to conduct monetary policy. In theory, as the value of consumers' stock portfolios rise, they will spend more because they are wealthier. It turned out, though, that the empirical link between monetary policy, equity prices, and consumption has…

  • Commentary posted August 28, 2015 by Justin T. Johnson Politicians and Analysts Call for Larger Navy: Can We Afford It?

    The United States Navy has been shrinking for decades and is now at levels last seen in the 1930’s. Politicians on both sides of the aisle say they want to reverse that trend. But is a larger Navy really affordable? Today’s Navy has 273 active duty ships—14% fewer than were afloat on 9/11. During his 2012 presidential campaign, Mitt Romney proposed a plan to get the Navy…

  • Commentary posted August 28, 2015 by Justin T. Johnson What Should America Spend on Defense and Why?

    The debate about defense spending will likely reignite in September as Congress returns from recess and the end of the fiscal year draws near. Unfortunately, much of that debate will not be very helpful or informative. Instead of arguing the merits of a particular military spending level, much of the debate will revolve around Democratic opposition to increasing defense…

  • Commentary posted August 26, 2015 by Nicolas Loris California green failure a warning for states facing Clean Power Plan

    In the eyes of the Obama administration, California is the gold standard for state energy policy. The feds lavishly laud the Golden State’s aggressive green energy mandates and stringent energy efficiency requirements. But few states have jumped on California’s green energy bandwagon — and with good reason. The California Clean Energy Jobs Act (Proposition 39) raised…

  • Commentary posted August 26, 2015 by Edwin J. Feulner, Ph.D. An unhealthy dependence on food stamps

    Good news: The number of Americans using food stamps in 2014 declined slightly from the previous year. So why does the 2015 Index of Culture and Opportunity say this indicator is headed in the “wrong direction”? There are a couple of reasons. For one, the food-stamp program (officially known now as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP) is still much…

  • Commentary posted August 24, 2015 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. Nuclear Distraction: Inattention Has Put The U.S. In Danger

    The Iran Deal is the biggest nuclear story of the decade. Yet most Americans are paying little attention. Even the 70th anniversary of dropping the atomic bombs on Japan stirred little interest. Today, nuclear weapons are pretty much “out of sight, out of mind.” That’s quite a change from the Cold War era, when an entire generation of Americans was raised on worrying…

  • Commentary posted August 24, 2015 by Hans A. von Spakovsky America's Sanctuary City Nightmare

    A litigation battle is raging between the states and President Barack Obama over his attempt to impose a nationwide “sanctuary” policy for illegal aliens. Yet, there is no question that existing sanctuary policies implemented by numerous towns and cities have victimized innocent Americans. Those sanctuary policies have enabled illegal aliens to commit thousands of crimes…

  • Commentary posted August 21, 2015 by Jim DeMint Get the Government Out of Public Broadcasting

    The rest of PBS should follow the lead of Sesame Street Big Bird, like the dodo, doesn’t fly. But he may now fair better than the ungainly fowl last seen in Mauritius in the 1600s. That’s because Big Bird has migrated to HBO, leaving behind the unchallenging environment of public broadcasting. The dodo became extinct because it was flightless. It was flightless because,…

  • Commentary posted August 19, 2015 by Riley Walters Robotics Answers: Japan aims to lead next Industrial Revolution

    Imagine a bed that turns into an electric wheelchair, or a sensor system on the factory floor of an automated warehouse that tells machines to slow down when humans are walking nearby, or an exoskeleton that can help a stroke victim learn to walk again. These are examples of robots that exist today. Now imagine a robot with which you can have meaningful conversations; a…

  • Commentary posted August 19, 2015 by Ana Quintana Don't Celebrate America's Diplomatic Opening to Cuba

    On Friday August 14, John Kerry is slated to arrive in Havana, where he will formally reopen the United States’ embassy on the island. It will be the first time a U.S. Secretary of State has set foot in Cuba in 70 years. But the embassy opening should be no cause for celebration. It is a simply one more false step in this administration’s foreign policy—a miscue that…

  • Commentary posted August 19, 2015 by Brett D. Schaefer, Ambassador Terry Miller The UN Turns Its Economic Development Goals to Mush

    The United Nations is quite proud of its Millennium Development Goals - the criteria it uses to measure the success of economic development programs. In a 2013 report, U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon "modestly" stated that "Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) have been the most successful global anti-poverty push in history." Of course, this is vastly…

  • Commentary posted August 19, 2015 by Kim R. Holmes, Ph.D. What happens if Congress says no to the Iran deal?

    You’ve heard the argument. If Congress turns down the Iran nuclear deal, Tehran will rush to get a nuclear bomb within two to three months. Our only alternative then is war. But what about Congress voting “no” and re-adjusting the terms of the agreement? Robert Satloff, the executive director of the Washington Institute for Near East Policy, recently made such a…

  • Commentary posted August 19, 2015 by Jim DeMint, Bruce Klingner Easing the Strains Between Japan and South Korea

    As world attention has recently been focused elsewhere, longstanding tensions between two critical U.S. allies, Japan and South Korea, have quietly been easing. This is the result of initiatives by the leaders of both countries, as well as the concerted efforts of diplomats. That’s good news for Washington, since together the three nations can better address common…