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  • Commentary posted July 25, 2016 by Hans A. von Spakovsky, Elizabeth Slattery Why Republicans Should Not Fold On Garland's Nomination

    Some pundits, such as Leon Wolf at RedState, are urging Senate Republicans to quickly confirm President Obama’s nominee, Merrick Garland, to fill the Supreme Court vacancy left by the sudden passing of Justice Antonin Scalia in February. Wolf argues that there’s “absolutely no reason to drag this out any longer” because “Republicans must know that there is absolutely no…

  • Commentary posted July 25, 2016 by Hans A. von Spakovsky, Elizabeth Slattery Left Disappointed with "Old White Guy" Supreme Court Nominee

    Once a lecturer at the University of Chicago law school, President Obama returned to his old stomping grounds to make the case for confirming his Supreme Court nominee, D.C. Circuit Chief Judge Merrick Garland. Many on the Left have bemoaned the fact that Garland is “an old white guy.” More specifically, he’s a 63-year-old Jewish, Ivy-League-educated white guy. Several…

  • Commentary posted July 25, 2016 by Elizabeth Slattery The Scalia Election

    The just-concluded Supreme Court term starkly makes the case for why the Court should be at the forefront of every voter’s mind this November. The sudden passing of Justice Antonin Scalia in February led to deadlocks and compromises in some of the biggest cases of the term, highlighting the importance of every seat on the Court. Whomever the next president selects as…

  • Commentary posted July 25, 2016 by Hans A. von Spakovsky, Elizabeth Slattery Left Disappointed with "Old White Guy" Supreme Court Nominee

    Once a lecturer at the University of Chicago law school, President Obama returned to his old stomping grounds to make the case for confirming his Supreme Court nominee, D.C. Circuit Chief Judge Merrick Garland. Many on the Left have bemoaned the fact that Garland is “an old white guy.” More specifically, he’s a 63-year-old Jewish, Ivy-League-educated white guy. Several…

  • Commentary on July 25, 2016 How is Russia's Economy? A Yeltsin-Style 'Not Good'

    Sometime in the mid-1990s, British Prime Minister John Major reportedly asked Russian President Boris Yeltsin to describe the Russian economy in one word. Yeltsin replied, “Good.” Seeking greater detail, Major asked Yeltsin if he could describe it in two words. Yeltsin replied, “Not good.” While this old joke is probably a myth, the current state of the Russian economy…

  • Commentary posted July 25, 2016 by Elizabeth Slattery Obama Can't Rewrite the Law

    The president does not have the power to create or rewrite legislation — that is Congress’s job. He is not authorized to dispense with or suspend the law. British kings made this practice familiar to the Framers of the Constitution, who deliberately chose to deny such a power to the president. Yet while history books are filled with disputes between the president and…

  • Commentary posted July 20, 2016 by Dean Cheng South China Sea After the Tribunal Ruling: Where Do We Go From Here?

    On July 12, the Permanent Court of Arbitration (PCA) at The Hague handed down perhaps the most long awaited finding in its history. After nearly four years of deliberation, the Court ruled on several South China Sea issues, based on a case filed by the Philippines against the People’s Republic of China (PRC). On issue after issue, the Court came down overwhelmingly in…

  • Commentary posted July 15, 2016 by David R. Burton How the OECD is Promoting More Identity Theft, Crime, Industrial Espionage, and Suppression of Political Dissidents

    Tax treaties are usually positive or benign. The protocol amending the multilateral Convention on Mutual Administrative Assistance in Tax Matters, currently being considered for ratification by the United States senate, is being marketed by the Obama Treasury, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) and tax officials in various national…

  • Commentary posted July 15, 2016 by David R. Burton The Treaty to End Financial Privacy

    Don't judge a treaty by its title, no matter how bureaucratically mundane it may sound. Exhibit A: The Protocol Amending the Multilateral Convention on Mutual Administrative Assistance in Tax Matters. The U.S. Treasury Department is marketing the agreement as just another tax treaty, because such treaties are usually positive or benign. But this is no ordinary tax…

  • Commentary posted July 15, 2016 by William T. Wilson, Ph.D. How is Russia's Economy? A Yeltsin-Style 'Not Good'

    Sometime in the mid-1990s, British Prime Minister John Major reportedly asked Russian President Boris Yeltsin to describe the Russian economy in one word. Yeltsin replied, “Good.” Seeking greater detail, Major asked Yeltsin if he could describe it in two words. Yeltsin replied, “Not good.” While this old joke is probably a myth, the current state of the Russian economy…

  • Commentary posted July 14, 2016 by Norbert J. Michel, Ph.D. Why Big-Wig Financial Execs Love Dodd-Frank

    House Financial Services Committee Chairman Jeb Hensarling (R-Texas) has released a discussion draft of the Financial CHOICE Act, legislation that would replace large parts of the failed Dodd-Frank Act. It has attracted some high-profile fans. Three Nobel Prize winning economists, a former U.S. Treasury Secretary, and a host of academics and policy officials have released…

  • Commentary posted July 11, 2016 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. The Truth About the America First Movement

    Only days after America’s entry into World War II, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill offered his new American allies some advice. “War is a constant struggle and must be waged day to day,” Churchill counseled. “It is only with some difficulty and within limits that provisions for the future can be made.” It was an axiom that Charles A. Lindbergh, the famed-aviator…

  • Commentary posted July 11, 2016 by Steven P. Bucci, Ph.D. Growing Ballistic Missile Threats Cannot Be Ignored

    China, Russia, Iran, North Korea—all are U.S. adversaries, and all are making remarkable and continual advances in long-range ballistic missile capabilities.  Maintaining and modernizing our upper-tier missile defense system has never been more vital in order for the U.S. to be able to win on the future war landscape. Repeated cuts to the U.S. ballistic missile defense…

  • Commentary posted July 6, 2016 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. Meet the Inspiring Soldiers of Veteran Nation

    We knew when we decided to make our award-winning documentary on the past, present, and future of how the nation treats its veterans, well, we knew it would have to include—well veterans.  We had no idea what an incredible group of inspiring men and women would step forward to tell their stories. Just introducing the soldiers, airman, and Marines that helped bring…

  • Commentary posted July 6, 2016 by Robert E. Moffit, Ph.D. Here's How Congress Can Save Medicare

    When will Medicare’s hospital insurance trust fund run out of money? A newly released report from the Medicare Trustees says it will be exhausted in 2028—two years earlier than they projected last year. Using slightly different assumptions, the Congressional Budget Office earlier predicted that the trust fund would be insolvent by 2026. No matter how you slice it, the…