• Heritage Action
  • Heritage Libertad
  • More
  • Commentary posted August 26, 2014 by Lisa Curtis, William T. Wilson, Ph.D. India's Big WTO Mistake

    It appeared to be a done deal. Last December in Bali, the 159 member countries of the World Trade Organization (WTO) signed off on the trade facilitation agreement (TFA). While not garnering much media attention, it should have. The accord was easily the largest multilateral trade agreement since the omnibus GATT (WTO’s predecessor) Uruguay Round in 1994. The TFA sought…

  • Commentary posted August 19, 2014 by Lisa Curtis Is Modi Ready to Lead?

    The new Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) government in India bodes well for the country's future economic prospects as well as its role in global affairs. Prime Minister Narendra Modi is seeking to erase his reputation as a communal leader and to demonstrate he will rule the nation in a way that benefits all Indians, not just the Hindu majority. Whether he will live up to his…

  • Testimony posted July 16, 2014 by Lisa Curtis Indispensable Partners—Re-energizing U.S.–Indian Ties

    Testimony before the Subcommittee on Near Eastern and South and Central Asian Affairs, Committee on Foreign Relations United States Senate My name is Lisa Curtis. I am Senior Research Fellow on South Asia in the Asian Studies Center at The Heritage Foundation. The views I express in this testimony are my own, and should not be construed as representing any official…

  • Commentary posted June 27, 2014 by William T. Wilson, Ph.D. India Unleashed

    Only a decade ago, India seemed destined to rival China. Annual growth had averaged almost 9 percent over a seven-year stretch; domestic investment was booming; domestic companies were building global brands, and its military power was growing. India seemed confident; almost cocky. Unfortunately, all that confidence has largely dissipated. Economic growth has dropped to…

  • Backgrounder posted June 2, 2014 by Lisa Curtis After the Election: Opportunity for Revitalizing U.S.–India Relations

    India’s recent election of a new Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) government presents an opportunity for reinvigorating U.S.–Indian ties, and ending the malaise that has taken over the relationship in the past few years. The previous government, led by the Congress Party under Manmohan Singh, had been weakened by a series of corruption scandals and showed little initiative in…

  • Commentary posted April 2, 2014 by Lisa Curtis India and Pakistan Under Modi

    Indian election results will not be in for another six weeks, but the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) seems on track to win the most parliamentary seats, making it likely that Narendra Modi will be the country’s next prime minister. With Modi’s rise to power comes an increased likelihood of greater Indo-Pakistani tensions and potential for military escalation, especially if…

  • Commentary posted December 21, 2013 by Lisa Curtis Time to arrest downward spiral: US must say sorry and India cut rhetoric

    US Secretary of State John Kerry's expression of regret over the US arrest of Indian diplomat Devyani Khobragade is not enough to get relations back on an even keel. For the sake of the partnership, which Secretary Kerry himself has referred to as one of the most important for the US in the twenty-first century, the US must apologize for the manner in which Khobragade…

  • Special Report posted October 7, 2013 by Walter Lohman, John Fleming, Olivia Enos A New View of Asia: 24 Charts that Show What's at Stake for America

    The Asian Studies Center Introduction Geography Economic Stakes Political Stakes Security Challenges Introduction: A New View of America's "Near West" At The Heritage Foundation’s annual B. C. Lee Lecture this year, the Chairman of the House Committee on Foreign Affairs summed up perfectly America’s destiny as regards Asia: It is America’s “Near…

  • Issue Brief posted September 26, 2013 by Lisa Curtis India: Congress and White House Should Have Modest Expectations for PM Singh Visit

    Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh’s meeting with U.S. President Barack Obama on Friday is unlikely to result in any major breakthroughs in the relationship. At most, it will provide an opportunity for the two sides to continue a strategic dialogue on critical global and regional issues. Disappointment among the American business community over India’s lack of economic…

  • Commentary posted July 16, 2013 by Lisa Curtis The Strategic Disconnect: There’s a Kayani in the Kerry-Khurshid Room

    US Secretary of State John Kerry’s visit to India this week focused largely on climate change and economic issues. From a US domestic perspective, this was no surprise. President Obama laid out Tuesday a sweeping plan for the US to address climate change and over 200 US Congressional leaders last week chastised India for discriminatory trade practices. In choosing this…

  • Issue Brief posted June 24, 2013 by Lisa Curtis Kerry in India: Setting the Tone on Security Issues

    U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry’s current visit to India will set the tone for cooperation between the two countries over the next few years, especially in key areas of shared interest, such as managing the security risks associated with China’s rise and the stabilization of Afghanistan. Focusing on the long-term potential of a strong U.S. relationship with India,…

  • Special Report posted April 26, 2013 by Sunjoy Joshi, C. Raja Mohan, Vikram Sood, Rajeswari Pillai Rajagopalan, Ph.D., James Jay Carafano, Ph.D., Walter Lohman, Lisa Curtis, Derek Scissors, Ph.D. Beyond the Plateau in U.S. – India Relations

    IntroductionIn real terms, there is no denying the extraordinary progress in the engagement between India and the United States over the past two decades. Throughout, and even after, the Cold War, the world's two largest democracies remained estranged. In the first decade after the end of the Cold War, the two countries quarreled over nuclear nonproliferation; the U.S.…

  • Testimony posted March 13, 2013 by Walter Lohman The Importance of Reality in US-India East Asia Cooperation

    Testimony before the Subcommittee on Asia and the Pacific Committee on Foreign Affairs United States House of Representatives   March 13, 2013 Walter Lohman My name is Walter Lohman. I am Director of the Asian Studies Center at The Heritage Foundation. The views I express in this testimony are my own, and should not be construed as representing any official position of…

  • Issue Brief posted February 15, 2013 by Walter Lohman, Derek Scissors, Ph.D. U.S. Should Back India’s Membership in APEC

    It has been a bad half-decade for American foreign economic policy. The World Trade Organization’s (WTO) Doha round was mortally wounded in 2008. The last three bilateral trade agreements were stalled and then renegotiated. The next one is not even on the radar screen. While the 11-nation Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) and a possible agreement with the 27-nation European…

  • Issue Brief posted January 25, 2013 by Lisa Curtis Indo–Pakistani Tension: Pakistan Should Crack Down on Militant Infiltration

    Tensions between India and Pakistan are heating up along the Line of Control (LoC) that divides Kashmir. A series of border incidents in early January left three Pakistani and two Indian soldiers dead. One of the Indian soldiers was beheaded and another severely mutilated, provoking Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh to say that India’s ties with Pakistan would not be…