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  • Commentary posted September 2, 2014 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. An American’s perspective on the rise of Ukip

    After its triumph in the European elections in May, Ukip was stuck in the doldrums before the backbencher Douglas Carswell electrified politics by resigning his Tory-held seat in Clacton and announcing his intention to stand for the United Kingdom Independence Party in an unexpected by-election. Meanwhile, in the USA, the Tea Party is up one week, down the next. But the…

  • Special Report posted June 6, 2014 by Alberto Alesina, Ph.D., Romina Boccia, Ryan Bourne, Salim Furth, Ph.D., David Howden, Ph.D., Filip Jolevski, Miguel Marin, Matthew Melchiorre, Derrick Morgan, Dalibor Rohac, Veronique de Rugy Europe’s Fiscal Crisis Revealed: An In-Depth Analysis of Spending, Austerity, and Growth

    About the Authors Alberto Alesina, PhD, is Nathaniel Ropes Professor of Political Economy at Harvard University. He is also a member of the National Bureau of Economic Research, the Center for Economic Policy Research, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the Econometric Society. Romina Boccia is Grover M. Hermann Fellow in Federal Budgetary Affairs in the…

  • Commentary posted May 26, 2014 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Growing Pains

    "So, what are you going to do about the problem of dog fouling?” I was following Donna Edmunds, a district councilor and a United Kingdom Independence party (UKIP) candidate for the European parliament, as she went door to door in the center of Lewes, a picturesque town nestled just below the South Downs, on the edge of the London commuter belt. There weren’t many votes…

  • Commentary posted April 7, 2014 by Edwin J. Feulner, Ph.D. Remembering Margaret Thatcher a year after her death

    It’s no secret that your average politician avoids plain speaking at all costs. He mouths platitudes that sound good, but which enable him to dodge accountability and turn whichever way the wind happens to be blowing. So it’s always a bit startling when you hear one who lays it on the line. Using the following three examples, see if you can you identify one famous…

  • Commentary posted March 22, 2014 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Can Britain learn to stand up for itself?

    ONE way or another, Britain will have a national referendum on EU membership. But the point of the referendum is not to vote. It is to choose between different futures. The advocates of the EU, like Lord Mandelson, argue that Britain needs to “concentrate on using all of our influence and energy in building up Britain’s influence in Europe”. That is the same siren song…

  • Backgrounder posted February 13, 2014 by Luke Coffey Self-Determination and National Security: Why the U.S. Should Back British Sovereignty over Gibraltar

    The more than three-centuries-long dispute between Spain and the United Kingdom over the status of Gibraltar has been heating up again. The United States has interests at stake in the dispute. The U.S. benefits from its close relationship with Gibraltar as a British Overseas Territory in a way that would not be possible if Gibraltar was under the control of Spain. The…

  • Commentary posted November 23, 2013 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. UK needs freedom to pick talent from whole world

    Make no mistake, New York is a great city. I can’t visit it without a sense of ant-like awe. Yet while I respect New York, I love London. It’s gigantic, but it still feels like civilization on a human scale. I’ve been coming to Britain – not just London – regularly since 1989. But when I visited London again last month, I felt something different. New York is…

  • Commentary posted October 7, 2013 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Flexible relations will help Britain achieve a more prosperous future

    In public policy, what starts as the unthinkable can first become simply the impossible, then the undesirable, then the possible, then the inevitable – and, finally, the right choice all along. Forty years ago, permanent British membership of the EEC – as it then was – appeared all but inevitable. Now it’s Britain’s exit that is well into the ‘possible’ stage, with…

  • Lecture posted July 2, 2013 by Jim DeMint Britain and the U.S.: Two Peoples United by an Attachment to Self-Determination

    I would like to thank the Henry Jackson Society, not just for this event today, but for the very important work you do on transatlantic relations and security concerns. You stand up for freedom around the world, and I salute you for that. I would like to say one word about the man after whom you’re named. Scoop Jackson was the kind of Democrat I wish we had more of today.…

  • Play Movie The London Attacks: A Closer Look - Brookes on 'Cavuto' Video Recorded on May 22, 2013 The London Attacks: A Closer Look - Brookes on 'Cavuto'

    Senior Fellow Peter Brookes discusses the grizzly terrorism and murder in London on Fox News' 'Your World w/Cavuto'.…

  • Special Report posted April 29, 2013 by Robin Harris, D. Phil. Britain and Europe: Where America’s Interests Really Lie

    Introduction The United States has a strong and continuing interest in a prosperous and stable Europe, but the policies and pronouncements of President Barack Obama and the U.S. Department of State are making that goal less, not more, attainable. This is especially true as regards current, very public U.S. pressure on Britain to stay inside the European Union, apparently…

  • Backgrounder posted March 4, 2013 by Luke Coffey, Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D., Nile Gardiner, Ph.D. The United States Should Recognize British Sovereignty Over the Falkland Islands

    In 1982, the United Kingdom, led by Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, went to war with Argentina in the South Atlantic to retake the Falkland Islands. Unprovoked, Argentina had invaded the Islands and occupied them for two months. Against the odds, Prime Minister Thatcher assembled a naval task force and deployed it to the South Atlantic to liberate the Islands and their…

  • Heritage in Focus: Bullying the Falklands Audio Recorded on March 1, 2013 Heritage in Focus: Bullying the Falklands

    Fellows Luke Coffey and Ted Bromund discuss the century-long feud between Argentina and the United Kingdom over sovereignty of the Falkland Islands on this week's Heritage in Focus. Jackie Anderson hosts. To get regular updates on Heritage in Focus podcasts, visit our RSS feed or subscribe on iTunes.…

  • Issue Brief posted February 27, 2013 by Luke Coffey, Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D., Nile Gardiner, Ph.D. Falkland Islands: U.S. Should Support Right to Self-Determination

    On March 10–11, the Falkland Islands, a British Overseas Territory in the South Atlantic, will hold a referendum to decide whether to maintain allegiance to Great Britain. The islands are self-governing but maintain the British monarch as their head of state. The referendum is an answer to Argentina, which, though defeated by Britain in the 1982 Falklands War, is again…

  • Issue Brief posted January 9, 2013 by Nile Gardiner, Ph.D., Luke Coffey, Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Hagel, Kerry, and Brennan Senate Confirmation Hearings: U.S. Policy on Europe

    In the coming weeks, the United States Senate will begin the confirmation process for three key Administration positions: Senator John Kerry (D–MA) for Secretary of State, former Senator Chuck Hagel (R–NE) for Secretary of Defense, and White House Chief Counterterrorism Advisor John Brennan for Director of the CIA. All three have been prominent backers of President…