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  • Commentary posted April 26, 2016 by Nile Gardiner, Ph.D. Butt out of Brexit

    President Obama was in London on Friday, warning the British people against leaving the European Union. He has already been sharply criticized by British members of Parliament, including London Mayor Boris Johnson. And with good reason: Obama is sending the wrong message. His intervention is proving both controversial and unpopular, a demonstration of how out of touch he…

  • Commentary posted March 14, 2016 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Britain's Move to Perhaps Leave the EU Is Not Radical

    How would you like it if the United States got together with Canada, Mexico, and every other nation in the New World and set up a new government, headquartered in Guatemala? This government would be run by an unelected bureaucracy with its own supreme court. It could void any of our laws. It would tax us, impose rules on us, and tell us who we could trade freely…

  • Commentary posted March 7, 2016 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Symbols Without Substance

    A few weeks ago, I met a group of Europeans who were touring the US on the State Department’s International Visitor Leadership Program. When the conversation turned to the proposed US-EU trade deal, most of the European delegation seemed to agree (sensibly) that its economic impact would be minor. But they supported it none the less, on the argument that it would be a…

  • Commentary posted February 26, 2016 by Nile Gardiner, Ph.D. O Americans, Embrace Brexit

    President Obama is no supporter of Brexit. Just as David Cameron is warning of grave consequences for Britain if it leaves the European Union – floods of migrants crossing the English Channel, economic isolation, heightened terrorism risks – the American president has told the British people that Brexit is against US interests and will weaken the transatlantic alliance.…

  • Commentary posted January 21, 2016 by Robin Simcox Meet Mr. McDonnell: Jeremy Corbyn’s Right-Hand Man Is A Far-Left Radical

    Few Americans will have heard of John McDonnell MP. Yet a demonstration he attended in support of Guantanamo Bay detainees outside the U.S. Embassy in London last week shows why they should begin to take notice. This far-left firebrand is now just a Conservative government implosion away from becoming the second most powerful politician in the UK, and that spells bad news…

  • Commentary posted January 11, 2016 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Why Project Fear Is David Cameron's Ultimate Weapon in EU Struggle

    David Cameron launched his renegotiation of Britain’s EU membership with the hope that “we can deliver a more flexible, adaptable and open European Union”. As that optimism has faded, the resort to fear has grown. And so far, the US has lent a willing hand. It’s startling to go back now to Cameron’s Bloomberg speech. It appeared to make the case for fundamental reform…

  • Commentary posted May 18, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. They Said It Couldn’t Be Done

    London The smart money said there was no way the Conservatives could win a majority in last Thursday’s general election in Britain. On the left, the New Statesman’s widely followed May2015 blog offered a cogent argument that there would be a blocking majority even against any repeat of the Conservative-led coalition government. On the right, columnist Matthew Parris…

  • Commentary posted May 13, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. A very British shock result and what it may mean

    I’ve studied Britain for 20 years, but this last week gave me an appreciation for its politics I’ve never had before. Over the last seven days, I followed Conservative candidates in Darlington, Bradford West and Brent Central as they canvassed and addressed the public. All worked hard; all were worthy, and all were in tough constituencies. In the end, none won. Like…

  • Commentary posted April 20, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Election reveals a battle for Britain’s true liberal soul

    The debates between the party leaders have made one thing clear. The election isn’t just a struggle between the Tories, Labour, and the rest. It’s a moment that reveals the state of British liberalism. By liberalism, I don’t mean the nanny-statism that today passes for liberalism, with its identity group politics, its ravenous appetite for state spending in the name of…

  • Commentary posted January 20, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. The closing chapter of a not so special relationship?

    The White House announced Prime Minister David Cameron’s two-day visit to Washington in a statement issued last Saturday. It was a tellingly low-key announcement for an Anglo-American relationship that has mostly drifted in the past five years. The alliance, though, does have one big idea up its sleeve. Unfortunately, it’s a bad one. It’s entirely possible that this will…

  • Issue Brief posted January 13, 2015 by Nile Gardiner, Ph.D., Luke Coffey, Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. David Cameron’s Visit to Washington: An Important Opportunity to Renew Anglo–American Leadership

    President Barack Obama will host British Prime Minister David Cameron at the White House on January 15–16. This will be Cameron’s last visit to the United States before the U.K.’s general election on May 7, 2015. Five issues should dominate the visit: (1) Russia’s aggression in Eastern Europe; (2) the crisis in Iran and the Levant; (3) the future of the U.K. inside the…

  • Commentary posted November 21, 2014 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. In Britain, Conservatives Face Defeat in ‘Crisis’ By-Election

    On Thursday, English voters in the constituency of Rochester and Strood, in the country of Kent south-east of London, are likely to return Mark Reckless to Parliament as the UK Independence Party’s (UKIP) second MP. When Conservative Prime Minister David Cameron promised a month ago to throw “everything we can” at the campaign, this wasn’t the result he anticipated. Like…

  • Commentary posted October 6, 2014 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Politics of Floating Voters Dominate the Conferences

    This year, I attended the Conservative Party Conference, which has just concluded in Birmingham. As a historian of British politics, and as an American conservative who believes that the American and British systems are each excellent in their own way, it was not what I expected. One point of comparison is obvious: both the US and Britain have party conventions. In…

  • Commentary posted October 2, 2014 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. In Birmingham, Shut Up and Cheer

    The first thing that strikes an American about the Conservative party’s annual conference — which opened on Sunday in Birmingham, in Britain’s Midlands — is how small it feels. The convention center will supposedly welcome almost 14,000 attendees, but it looked less crowded — and less engaged — than the meeting in the United States of the Conservative Political Action…

  • Commentary posted September 25, 2014 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. The Scottish Referendum: Who Won, Who Lost

    In the end, the vote in Scotland wasn’t particularly close. With 97 percent of the eligible population registered to vote, and an 85 percent turnout, Scotland rejected independence by a decisive margin of just over 2 million votes against (and 1.6 million for). The independence campaign put a serious scare into the supporters of the Union, but they started behind. As…