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  • Commentary posted March 25, 2014 by Diane Katz EU's cheesy food fight stinks to high heaven

    The European Union (EU) regulates the curvature of cucumbers, the contour of radish “shoulders” and the arc of pea pods. We should not be surprised, then, by Brussels’ recent demand that American cheese makers refrain from labeling their products as “feta,” “mozzarella,” “parmesan” or any other appellation of European origin. One might reasonably wonder whether cheese…

  • Commentary posted March 22, 2014 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Can Britain learn to stand up for itself?

    ONE way or another, Britain will have a national referendum on EU membership. But the point of the referendum is not to vote. It is to choose between different futures. The advocates of the EU, like Lord Mandelson, argue that Britain needs to “concentrate on using all of our influence and energy in building up Britain’s influence in Europe”. That is the same siren song…

  • Commentary posted February 16, 2014 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. Visa waivers shouldn't be hostage to fight over illegal immigrant amnesty

    In 2007, then Sen. George Voinovich told the story of a young Czech soldier who wanted to visit some American veterans with whom he had served side-by-side in Iraq. He applied for a visa, but the U.S. consular office gave him an expected answer: Application denied. The reason? He had recently been in a country with an active terrorist threat. Iraq. One year later, things…

  • Issue Brief posted January 24, 2014 by Ariel Cohen, Ph.D. Ukraine’s Anti-Protest Laws: A Step Backwards in Time

    Violent clashes between police and demonstrators erupted in Kyiv, Ukraine, last weekend in the wake of new legislation effectively banning public protest. If the two sides do not take a step back from the brink, the confrontation may lead to chaos, when neither the government nor the opposition have control. The legislation, passed on January 16 by President Victor…

  • Issue Brief posted December 5, 2013 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D., Rea S. Hederman, Jr., Bryan Riley, Luke Coffey Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP): Pitfalls and Promises

    The United States and the European Union (EU) have begun the negotiation of the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP), which could greatly reduce or eliminate both tariff and non-tariff barriers to trade between the U.S. and the EU, a trade relationship that accounts for about 30 percent of world trade. The promotion of economic freedom is a vital part of…

  • Backgrounder posted October 21, 2013 by Ariel Cohen, Ph.D. Why the U.S. Should Support Ukraine’s Association and Free Trade Agreements with Europe

    On August 17, 2013, the Kyiv-based website Ukraine Today published a document summarizing the Kremlin’s strategy on how to force Ukraine to join Russia’s sphere of influence.[1] The Russian strategy, which the Kremlin has not disavowed, is designed to pressure Ukraine into joining a Moscow-led Customs Union (which currently includes Belarus and Kazakhstan). The strategy…

  • Lecture posted July 2, 2013 by Jim DeMint Britain and the U.S.: Two Peoples United by an Attachment to Self-Determination

    I would like to thank the Henry Jackson Society, not just for this event today, but for the very important work you do on transatlantic relations and security concerns. You stand up for freedom around the world, and I salute you for that. I would like to say one word about the man after whom you’re named. Scoop Jackson was the kind of Democrat I wish we had more of today.…

  • Backgrounder posted June 6, 2013 by Luke Coffey EU Defense Integration: Undermining NATO, Transatlantic Relations, and Europe’s Security

    When it comes to defense and military capability in the 21st century, it is clear that Europe is not pulling its weight. Spending and investment in defense across Europe has steadily declined since the end of the Cold War. The political will to deploy troops into harm’s way when it is in the national interest has all but evaporated for most EU countries. During the recent…

  • Lecture posted June 4, 2013 by Charles Moore United States of … America or Europe?

    Edwin J. Feulner: Thank you for being here. This is the eighth Margaret Thatcher lecture at The Heritage Foundation. Our previous distinguished speakers have included former Australian Prime Minister John Howard, human rights champion and Soviet dissident Natan Sharansky, and leading free-market economist Hernando de Soto. The purpose of the lecture series is to advance…

  • Issue Brief posted May 10, 2013 by Luke Coffey, James Phillips On Hezbollah, the U.S. Should Work Around the EU

    The European Union (EU) has repeatedly failed to designate Hezbollah as a terrorist organization. This failure makes Europeans and the Euro-Atlantic region less safe. It also shows the EU’s shortcomings when it comes to agreeing on common positions and demonstrates why individual European countries need to develop their own policies regarding national security. Since the…

  • Special Report posted April 29, 2013 by Robin Harris, D. Phil. Britain and Europe: Where America’s Interests Really Lie

    Introduction The United States has a strong and continuing interest in a prosperous and stable Europe, but the policies and pronouncements of President Barack Obama and the U.S. Department of State are making that goal less, not more, attainable. This is especially true as regards current, very public U.S. pressure on Britain to stay inside the European Union, apparently…

  • Lecture posted March 5, 2013 by Luke Coffey Power to the People? The Future of Europe

    I would like to begin by thanking the CATO Institute for hosting this event and for inviting me to participate. I am going to offer an alternative view of Europe today. I am a pro-states-rights American. I believe that power should be shifted to, and decisions should be made at, the lowest level closest to those most affected. My views on Europe are shaped first and…

  • Issue Brief posted February 21, 2013 by Luke Coffey, Nile Gardiner, Ph.D., Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. John Kerry’s Grand Tour: Priorities for Europe

    From February 24 to March 6, John Kerry will make his first trip overseas since being appointed U.S. Secretary of State. During this period, he will be visiting the United Kingdom, Germany, France, Italy, Turkey, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, and Qatar. The Obama Administration has too often taken America’s relations with Europe for granted. Secretary…

  • Issue Brief posted January 9, 2013 by Nile Gardiner, Ph.D., Luke Coffey, Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Hagel, Kerry, and Brennan Senate Confirmation Hearings: U.S. Policy on Europe

    In the coming weeks, the United States Senate will begin the confirmation process for three key Administration positions: Senator John Kerry (D–MA) for Secretary of State, former Senator Chuck Hagel (R–NE) for Secretary of Defense, and White House Chief Counterterrorism Advisor John Brennan for Director of the CIA. All three have been prominent backers of President…

  • Backgrounder posted September 4, 2012 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D., Andrew Robert James Southam The U.S.–U.K. Extradition Treaty: Fair, Balanced, and Worth Defending

    Abstract: The 2003 Extradition Treaty between the United States and Great Britain is intensely controversial in the United Kingdom. The treaty resulted from a British process and is a modern and praiseworthy approach to extradition that is based on an objective evidentiary test, requires dual criminality in all cases, and has a proportionality standard. The European…