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  • Commentary posted January 25, 2016 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. The Top Ten US Myths About the European Union

    If the US is to be an effective ally of the democratic nations of Europe, it must see the European Union (EU) as it really is. In the years after the Second World War, the US was right to encourage Western Europe to trade more freely and to cooperate for their own security, both to defend against the Soviet threat and to stabilize the region’s fragile post-war…

  • Commentary posted January 11, 2016 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Why Project Fear Is David Cameron's Ultimate Weapon in EU Struggle

    David Cameron launched his renegotiation of Britain’s EU membership with the hope that “we can deliver a more flexible, adaptable and open European Union”. As that optimism has faded, the resort to fear has grown. And so far, the US has lent a willing hand. It’s startling to go back now to Cameron’s Bloomberg speech. It appeared to make the case for fundamental reform…

  • Issue Brief posted January 8, 2016 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D., Daniel Kochis Top Five Priorities for U.S. Policy Toward Europe in 2016

    U.S. policy toward Europe in 2015 failed to rise to the significant challenges that confront it. The U.S. is no closer to having a clear and comprehensive strategy to deal with Russia than it was a year ago; it continues to devalue key bilateral and multilateral relationships in Europe for the sake of supporting the European Union (EU); and it took no effective steps to…

  • Lecture posted December 8, 2015 by Roger Scruton The Future of European Civilization: Lessons for America

    In a gloomy but strangely enthralling book published at the end of the First World War, the historian and polymath Oswald Spengler wrote of the decline of the West, arguing that Europe was moving inevitably to its end according to a pattern that can be observed among civilizations from the beginning of recorded history. Each historical superorganism, he argued, displays…

  • Issue Brief posted September 29, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Ten Reasons to Rethink U.S. Support for British Membership of the European Union

    By the end of 2017, likely in 2016, Britain will hold a referendum on the results of Prime Minister David Cameron’s pledged renegotiation of the terms of British membership of the European Union. If the public rejects those terms, Britain will likely exit the EU. The “Brexit” referendum will be the most important event in Britain’s EU membership since a similar referendum…

  • Issue Brief posted August 19, 2015 by James L. Gattuso Europe’s Latest Export to America: Internet Censorship

    American Web users’ access to Internet content may soon be limited, thanks to a recent decision by French regulators. France’s National Commission on Informatics and Liberties (known by its French acronym CNIL) ordered Google to apply the European Union’s bizarre “right-to-be-forgotten” rules on a global basis in a June ruling. The search engine announced at the end of…

  • Issue Brief posted July 15, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D., James M. Roberts, Riddhi Dasgupta, PhD The Proposed Investor-State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) Mechanism: U.S. Should Oppose EU Demand to Abandon It

    Revised One of the most important components of the proposed Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) between the United States and the European Union is the establishment of a mechanism for investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS). An appropriately structured ISDS is an essential part of trade agreement enforcement and should be included in any comprehensive…

  • Issue Brief posted February 20, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D., James M. Roberts, Riddhi Dasgupta, PhD Investor-State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) Mechanisms: An Important Feature of High-Quality Trade Agreements

    One of the most important—albeit controversial—components of the proposed Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) trade agreement between the United States and the European Union (EU) is the provision creating an investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS) mechanism. The French Senate has unanimously called for the removal of this provision both from the TTIP…

  • Issue Brief posted January 14, 2015 by Luke Coffey, Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D., Nile Gardiner, Ph.D. Top Five Policy Priorities for Europe in 2015

    The United States faces mounting challenges in Europe in 2015. Russia is on the march in Ukraine, many of America’s oldest allies question its commitment to transatlantic security, and the economies of Europe have still not fully recovered from the Euro crisis. In addition, the specter of Islamist terrorism has raised its ugly head again in Europe, with the brutal slaying…

  • Commentary posted December 1, 2014 by Alden Abbott Transatlantic Trade Negotiations: Keeping Regulation in Check

    Last week, the George Washington University Center for Regulatory Studies convened a Conference (GW Conference) on the Status of Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) Negotiations between the European Union (EU) and the United States (U.S.), which were launched in 2013 and will continue for an indefinite period of time. In launching TTIP, the Obama…

  • Commentary posted October 2, 2014 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. In Birmingham, Shut Up and Cheer

    The first thing that strikes an American about the Conservative party’s annual conference — which opened on Sunday in Birmingham, in Britain’s Midlands — is how small it feels. The convention center will supposedly welcome almost 14,000 attendees, but it looked less crowded — and less engaged — than the meeting in the United States of the Conservative Political Action…

  • Backgrounder posted September 26, 2014 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D., Nile Gardiner, Ph.D. Freedom from the EU: Why Britain and the U.S. Should Pursue a U.S.–U.K. Free Trade Area

    The United Kingdom is considering leaving the European Union, and a referendum on British membership is currently scheduled for 2017. The most common argument against a British exit from the EU is that it would be bad for Britain’s economy and, in particular, would damage its ability to negotiate trading arrangements with the rest of the world—a responsibility currently…

  • Backgrounder posted September 17, 2014 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D., Luke Coffey, Bryan Riley The Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP): Economic Benefits and Potential Risks

    In February 2013, President Barack Obama called for a free trade agreement between the United States and the European Union during his State of the Union address. This proposed agreement is now known as the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP). The President’s announcement has been taken by politicians and commentators on both sides of the Atlantic as an…

  • Backgrounder posted September 17, 2014 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D., Nile Gardiner, Ph.D., Luke Coffey The Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP): The Geopolitical Reality

    In his February 2013 State of the Union Address, President Barack Obama called for a free trade agreement between the United States and the European Union. This proposed agreement is now known as the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP). The President’s announcement has been taken by politicians and commentators on both sides of the Atlantic as an effort…

  • Commentary posted March 25, 2014 by Diane Katz EU's cheesy food fight stinks to high heaven

    The European Union (EU) regulates the curvature of cucumbers, the contour of radish “shoulders” and the arc of pea pods. We should not be surprised, then, by Brussels’ recent demand that American cheese makers refrain from labeling their products as “feta,” “mozzarella,” “parmesan” or any other appellation of European origin. One might reasonably wonder whether cheese…