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  • Backgrounder posted August 19, 2010 by Gregg Girvan Consumer Power: 5 Lessons from Utah’s Heath Care Reform

    Abstract: Obamacare is on the march, and state policymakers must decide by 2014 how they will respond to this encroachment on states’ rights to control their own health insurance markets. The state of Utah has been on the reform path since 2005. With its system of defined contributions (as opposed to the standard defined benefits), a functioning health insurance exchange,…

  • Backgrounder posted July 30, 2010 by Gregg Girvan Utah’s Defined-Contribution Option: Patient-Centered Health Care

    Abstract: Americans who receive health insurance through their jobs generally have little flexibility: 86 percent of employers in the country offer only one plan. This system of “defined benefits” has worked well for expanding group coverage, but severely limits options for individuals, and has not kept costs from skyrocketing. Recipients of employer-sponsored health…

  • Backgrounder posted April 9, 2010 by Edmund F. Haislmaier State Health Care Reform: An Update on Utah's Reform

    Abstract: In sharp contrast to the recently enacted federal health care reform, Utah is taking a targeted approach to expanding coverage while moving the system in a more patient-centered direction. Utah's approach promises to increase the number of employers offering insurance, reduce the number of uninsured, provide true coverage portability, increase…

  • Commentary posted February 25, 2010 by Stuart M. Butler, Ph.D. Risking Big Changes with Small Reforms

    (Article originally written for the New England Journal of Medicine ) As the prospects for health care reform ebb and flow by the day, one school of thought holds that making modest adjustments rather than enacting large-scale reform could help to avert controversy and command more broad support. Perhaps --but…

  • Backgrounder posted May 14, 2008 by Dan Lips, Evan Feinberg Improving Education in the Nation's Capital: Expanding School Choice

    The District of Columbia is home to one of the nation's most troubled public school systems. The District spends $14,400 for every child in public school—well above the national average and more than any of the 50 states.[1] The 2007 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) reported that Washington, D.C.'s fourth and eighth graders scored lower than any other…

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