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  • White Paper posted July 17, 2012 by Walter Lohman, John Fleming, Robert Warshaw Key Asian Indicators: A Book of Charts

    America’s Enduring Leadership in Asia America has been engaged in Asia since a few decades after securing its independence. Its early interest is documented in the 1833 Treaty on Amity and Commerce between the U.S. and the Kingdom of Siam Thailand), and later in the market-opening 1854 Treaty of Kanagawa with Japan. The U.S. has, in fact, been a “resident…

  • Testimony posted November 3, 2011 by Bruce Klingner The Expanding U.S. – Korea Alliance: Protecting Freedom and Democracy in Asia

    My name is Bruce Klingner. I am Senior Research Fellow for Northeast Asia at The Heritage Foundation. The views I express in this testimony are my own, and should not be construed as representing any official position of The Heritage Foundation. It has been said that the U.S. – Republic of Korea alliance was “forged in blood.” That is surely true, because the true…

  • WebMemo posted May 18, 2011 by Bruce Klingner Proposed Re-Realignment for Northeast Asia Ignores Strategic Realities

    Senate Armed Services Committee chairman Carl Levin (D–MI), ranking member John McCain (R–AZ), and Senator Jim Webb (D–VA) have called on the United States to overhaul two complex military realignment agreements with South Korea and Japan. Their proposals would undermine years of carefully crafted diplomacy that achieved U.S. strategic objectives and resolved contentious…

  • White Paper posted January 14, 2011 by Walter Lohman, John Fleming, Nicholas Hamisevicz Key Asian Indicators: A Book of Charts

    The global financial crisis has had a major impact on perceptions of American power and its relationships in Asia. Many of the perceptions are not founded on facts. Among the facts often overlooked: American companies invest far more abroad than does all of Asia combined. For every dollar the U.S. has invested in China it has invested two in Australia…

  • WebMemo posted March 11, 2010 by Bruce Klingner New North Korean Missile Unit Reflects Growing Missile Threat

    North Korea has established an independent military division responsible for controlling and deploying its intermediate-range ballistic missiles (IRBMs).[1] Known as the Musudan,[2] these IRBMs are a strategic-level asset controlled by the senior leadership. Little is known about the missile, but U.S. assessments consider it to be a single-stage, road-mobile IRBM with a…

  • Commentary posted September 4, 2009 by Kim R. Holmes, Ph.D. The End of an Era in Japan?

    Sixty-four years ago this week, the Japanese formally surrendered to Allied forces on the USS Missouri, ending World War II. Thus began a long era in U.S.-Japanese relations characterized by a shared strategic vision and broad cooperation on security. That era may be over. This past weekend's elections ended five decades of dominance by the Liberal Democratic…

  • Commentary posted September 2, 2009 by Bruce Klingner America's New Japan Challenge

    The rumbling you heard across the Pacific Ocean over the weekend was Japan moving further from the United States -- and closer to China. Japan's left-of-center opposition party, which has long spouted anti-capitalist and anti-US rhetoric, won a landslide victory in Sunday's election. The Democratic Party of Japan wound up with 308 seats in the powerful lower…

  • Commentary posted September 2, 2009 by Bruce Klingner DPJ Victory Poses Challenges for U.S. Alliance

    Japan's opposition Democratic Party of Japan fulfilled predictions by winning a landslide victory over the moribund ruling party. The change in government is historic: It is only the second time in 50 years that the Liberal Democratic Party has been out of power. A disgruntled and angry electorate threw the LDP out of office for not only failing to fix Japan's…

  • Commentary posted July 8, 2009 by Peter Brookes Flashpoint: The Great Wall Goes to Sea

    Militarily, China has not been well-known for its navy. The Army has long been the dominant service in the People's Republic of China (PRC), a country celebrating the 60th anniversary of its founding by Mao Zedong in 1949. In fact, despite being known as the "Great Helmsman," Mao was so focused on the Army after taking power that it was not until 1953 that he…

  • Commentary posted July 2, 2009 by Peter Brookes Learning to Love Missile Defense

    The Obama administration is reacting to the anticipated launch of another North Korean long-range ballistic missile, expected to fly over the Pacific toward Hawaii sometime soon, by putting missile defense on alert. That's a big change from last time. Back in April, in advance of North Korea's last missile test, the administration pretty much pooh-poohed the…

  • WebMemo posted October 31, 2008 by Bruce Klingner North Korea Nuclear Verification: Has the U.S. Blinked?

    The Bush Administration announced on October 11 that it had removed North Korea from the state sponsors of terrorism list in return for Pyongyang's acceptance of a six-party talks verification protocol. Details of the verification agreement have not been disclosed pending formal approval at a heads of delegation meeting. The State Department claims that all…

  • WebMemo posted September 11, 2008 by Bruce Klingner Planning for a North Korea without Kim Jong-il

    Rumors that Kim Jong-il suffered a stroke have triggered concerns over the ramifications of instability and regime change in North Korea, particularly in regards to that nation's arsenal of nuclear weapons. Over the years, there have been scores of rumors regarding Kim, including illness, incapacitation, coup, assassination, and even death. Subsequently, jaded…

  • Commentary posted September 10, 2008 by Peter Brookes Korean Conundrum: What if Kim's Kaput?

    News reports that North Korean dictator Kim Jong Il has had a stroke could certainly be true. At 66, he's no spring chicken, especially considering his reportedly colorful lifestyle. In fact, every few years, news of Kim's incapacitation - or death - makes the rounds, based on intelligence, rumor or even the reading of tea leaves. Sorting fact from fiction is a…

  • WebMemo posted July 16, 2008 by Bruce Klingner North Korea Denuclearization Requires Rigorous Verification System

    On July 12, the six-party talks nations agreed on July 12 to broad measures for verifying North Korea's pledge to abandon its nuclear weapons programs. The joint communiqué was typically bereft of substantive details, which were deferred to a working group for resolution. North Korea did agree to verification measures that included "visits to facilities, review of…

  • WebMemo posted June 26, 2008 by Bruce Klingner Limited Progress on North Korean Denuclearization: CriticalQuestions Lie Ahead

    Pyongyang's June 26 delivery of a data declaration regarding its nuclear weapons programs and the anticipated destruction of the cooling tower at the Yongbyon nuclear reactor represent commendable progress toward North Korean denuclearization. Similarly, North Korea's earlier delivery of approximately 19,000 pages of Yongbyon's operating records provided a trove of…