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  • Issue Brief posted November 21, 2013 by Sarah Torre Obamacare’s Potential New Funding Streams for Abortion Providers

    Taxpayer funding streams from Obamacare and mandates on insurers could provide increased funding and coverage for abortion providers. Through grants awarded for promotional efforts and new coverage requirements on insurers providing qualified plans, the health care law could benefit Planned Parenthood and other providers of elective abortion. The coercive,…

  • Issue Brief posted November 21, 2013 by Sarah Torre Obamacare’s Abortion Surcharge and Taxpayer Funding of Abortion Coverage

    Obamacare will entangle taxpayer funds in abortion coverage offered on state and federal exchanges and could force many Americans to unwittingly pay a surcharge for elective abortion. This system could potentially place many Americans in an unwanted and unnecessary dilemma, forced to choose between violating their values by directly subsidizing abortion coverage or…

  • Issue Brief posted September 12, 2013 by Rachel Sheffield How to Reform Food Stamps

    For decades, farm bills have combined agriculture policy with the food stamps program. These farm bills would have been better deemed “food stamp bills,” as food stamps account for about 80 percent of farm bill costs. In July, the House passed an agriculture-only farm bill. By separating agriculture programs from food stamps, the House took a good first step, but it…

  • Issue Brief posted September 9, 2013 by Ryan T. Anderson The Social Costs of Abandoning the Meaning of Marriage

    Marriage plays a fundamental role in civil society because it is characterized by sexual complementarity, monogamy, exclusivity, and permanence. These marriage norms encourage men and women to commit permanently and exclusively to each other and take responsibility for their children.[1] In recent decades, a revisionist view of marriage has eroded these norms. No-fault…

  • Issue Brief posted August 7, 2013 by Ryan T. Anderson The Supreme Court and the Future of Marriage

    In a 5–4 majority opinion written by Justice Anthony Kennedy, the Supreme Court in U.S. v. Windsor struck down section 3 of the federal Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA), which defined marriage in federal law for federal policy as the union of one man and one woman. The Court held that the federal government has to accept state redefinitions of marriage for federal…

  • Issue Brief posted June 10, 2013 by Derrick Morgan How to Read the CBO’s Scoring of the Immigration Bill

    Sometime in the next few weeks, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) will produce a “score” of S. 744, the Border Security, Economic Opportunity, and Immigration Modernization Act (known colloquially as the “Gang of Eight bill”), as recently reported out of the Senate Judiciary Committee. During the last congressional debate over immigration reform in 2007, a CBO…

  • Center for Policy Innovation Discussion Paper posted May 29, 2013 by Stuart M. Butler, Ph.D., David C. John, Sean Rust Boosting Economic Mobility Through Prize-Linked Savings

    Discussions of economic mobility explore why some people are successful in moving up the economic ladder during their lifetime while others are not. While there is much debate about the degree of opportunity in America, there is general agreement that there seem to be significant and worrying obstacles facing Americans starting out in households at the bottom end of the…

  • Issue Brief posted March 25, 2013 by Ryan T. Anderson The Consequences of Redefining Marriage: Eroding Marital Norms

    Marriage is society’s least restrictive means of ensuring the well-being of children. State recognition of marriage protects children by encouraging men and women to commit to each other permanently and exclusively and to take responsibility for their children. The norms of monogamy and sexual exclusivity encourage the raising of children by their mother and father. The…

  • Issue Brief posted March 18, 2013 by Ryan T. Anderson Marriage Matters: Consequences of Redefining Marriage

    The Supreme Court is considering challenges to state and federal laws that define marriage as the union of a man and woman. After lower courts ruled against these marriage laws, the Supreme Court now has the opportunity to uphold the laws and return to citizens and their elected representatives the authority for answering questions about marriage policy. If marriage…

  • Issue Brief posted March 11, 2013 by Robert Rector, Rachel Sheffield How to Get Welfare Spending Under Control

    Since the beginning of the War on Poverty, government has spent nearly $20 trillion (adjusted for inflation) on means-tested welfare assistance for the poor. Means-tested programs provide cash, food, housing, medical care, and social services to poor and low-income Americans. Another name for these programs is assistance to the poor or anti-poverty spending. Currently,…

  • Backgrounder posted March 11, 2013 by Ryan T. Anderson Marriage: What It Is, Why It Matters, and the Consequences of Redefining It

    At the heart of the current debates about same-sex marriage are three crucial questions: What is marriage, why does marriage matter for public policy, and what would be the consequences of redefining marriage to exclude sexual complementarity? Marriage exists to bring a man and a woman together as husband and wife to be father and mother to any children their union…

  • Issue Brief posted March 8, 2013 by Matthew Spalding, Ph.D. A Defining Moment for Marriage and Self-Government

    What was once an important debate over the legal status of marriage has emerged as a critical national issue, the resolution of which will shape the future of our society and the course of constitutional government in the United States. Family is and will always remain the building block of civil society, and marriage is at the heart of the family. Redefining marriage…

  • Legal Memorandum posted January 25, 2013 by John C. Eastman The Constitutionality of Traditional Marriage

    On December 7, 2012, the Supreme Court of the United States announced that it would hear two cases challenging laws that define the institution of marriage as it has traditionally been understood: as a union between one man and one woman. In United States v. Windsor,[1] the Court will review the decision by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit holding that…

  • White Paper posted January 22, 2013 by Robert Rector, Jennifer A. Marshall The Unfinished Work of Welfare Reform

    Among the public-policy achievements of the past two decades, welfare reform may simultaneously be the best known and least understood. It is now remembered as a bipartisan triumph that ended “welfare as we know it,” to use President Clinton’s phrase, transforming the character of federal anti-poverty policy. The true history, however, is less august: The struggle to…

  • Backgrounder posted October 10, 2012 by Dominique Ludvigson Circumventing Citizens on Marriage: A Survey

    Abstract: Despite a history of consistent voter support for traditional marriage, the U.S. Supreme Court has been asked to address questions concerning this foundational social institution. The issue has been forced onto the Court’s docket by activist judges who have overruled democratically established marriage policies and by executive branch officials who have…