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  • Commentary posted December 12, 2013 by Mike Gonzalez Obama’s Love for Snubbing Dissidents

    President Obama’s handshake with Cuba’s dictator, Raúl Castro, was a slap in the face to those Cubans who are thrown into prison, beaten up in the streets, or otherwise oppressed because they dare to express their opposition to Communism. It was, however, classic Obama, in keeping with his pretensions to be a follower of the school of realpolitik and with his keen reading…

  • Commentary posted November 20, 2013 by Jim DeMint U.S. policy should help our democratic friends in Latin America

    Peace and prosperity in Latin America are important to the United States. Not only do we wish our fellow republics well, but their stability is in our national interest, too. That’s why it is worrisome that the Obama administration continues to squander freedom’s hard gains in a region facing many challenges. Take Central America. In 1980s it was a battleground…

  • Commentary posted November 18, 2013 by Edwin J. Feulner, Ph.D. Reliving the ‘End of Days’

    There are moments that bring us together as Americans, moments when we can all recall exactly where we were and what we were doing. Sept. 11. The explosion of the space shuttle Challenger. And, of course, the assassination of John F. Kennedy. I was substitute teaching in a west Philadelphia high school on Nov. 22, 1963. An assistant principal told me the news…

  • Commentary posted November 18, 2013 by Lisa Curtis Nato's total withdrawal from Afghanistan could rock Asia stability

    NATO'S withdrawal from Afghanistan in 2014 is likely to have far-reaching implications for Central and South Asia. And total withdrawal of troops could be devastating for regional security and jeopardise the safety of western nations, say analysts. The stability of the region is linked directly to the US’s long-term military and economic commitment to Afghanistan…

  • Commentary posted August 19, 2013 by Ariel Cohen, Ph.D. Putin Drops In, America Drops Out

    For the first time in his third term, Russian president Vladimir Putin has visited Azerbaijan. The former Soviet republic is an emerging leader in the South Caucasus region, and Putin's high-profile visit was another way to demonstrate to Washington that Russia’s zone of "privileged interests" today covers almost all post-Soviet republics with the exception of…

  • Commentary posted August 19, 2013 by Bruce Klingner The Kaesong Trap

    South and North Korean negotiators reached a preliminary agreement last week to reopen the jointly run industrial zone in Kaesong. But their success against considerable odds raises several questions. Most fundamentally, why does Seoul want to return to Kaesong in the first place? The benefits lop-sidedly accrue to Pyongyang, providing a steady source of hard currency…

  • Commentary posted August 17, 2013 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. Obama's Shredded Foreign-Policy Playbook

    Our president has lost his playbook. Mr. Obama came into office with a foreign-policy vision more clear and focused than most expected. It quickly became apparent that, on the international stage, he would be his own man. But now he is a different man. The problem is that every pillar upon which the Obama Doctrine rested seems unable to bear any weight. No longer…

  • Commentary posted August 17, 2013 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. Strong, Stable Egypt Vital to U.S. Interests

    A compelling case for cutting off aid to Egypt could have been made before President Mohamed Morsi was bounced from office. After all, Morsi was well on his way to placing the country under an Islamist regime — forever. That’s why he shut down foreign non-governmental organizations, curtailed civil rights and decreed the presidency superior to the courts. When the…

  • Commentary posted August 16, 2013 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. Enough with the CNN Effect!

    Generals don't talk like diplomats. Generals tend to be frank and practical. Sometimes a brief "military-to-military" exchange is more productive than an extended presidential summit. Hopefully, this was the case last week when Gen. Martin Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, met with Gen. Mashal al-Zaben, Jordan's top military officer. Al-Zaben reportedly had…

  • Commentary posted August 6, 2013 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. Obama's Sloppy History Problem

    Whatever the opposite of a charm offensive is, President Obama is on it. In Chicago on July 24, Obama delivered an hour-long speech in which he complained that “with this endless parade of distractions and political posturing and phony scandals, Washington has taken its eye off the ball.” The mother of one of the four Americans murdered at the U.S. diplomatic facility in…

  • Commentary posted July 26, 2013 by Kim R. Holmes, Ph.D. Second Time’s No Charm for Flawed U.N. Disability Pact

    If at first you don’t succeed, try again. That seems to be the Obama administration’s motto with respect to the U.N. Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). Last December, to the surprise of many, this oversold treaty went down in defeat in the Senate. Proponents want another shot at it, apparently thinking they can do a better sell job. But the…

  • Commentary posted July 23, 2013 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. How to Become a U.S. Ambassador

    Last week, President Barack Obama appointed a new ambassador to the Court of St. James's (most of us call it Britain). It's our most prestigious diplomatic post. It also had a "for rent" sign on it: the new ambassador, Matthew Barzun, was the chief fundraiser for Obama's re-election campaign. Barzun was formerly our ambassador to Sweden, a job he got because of his…

  • Commentary posted July 19, 2013 by Brett D. Schaefer An Honor System That’s Not Always Reliable

    Diplomatic immunity is vital to the conduct of international diplomacy. But it can be abused. In New York City, for example, we frequently hear of diplomats flouting traffic laws and not paying their tickets. According to the New York City Department of Finance, unpaid tickets totaled $16.7 million through the end of July 2011. The most egregious countries were Egypt…

  • Commentary posted July 16, 2013 by Lisa Curtis The Strategic Disconnect: There’s a Kayani in the Kerry-Khurshid Room

    US Secretary of State John Kerry’s visit to India this week focused largely on climate change and economic issues. From a US domestic perspective, this was no surprise. President Obama laid out Tuesday a sweeping plan for the US to address climate change and over 200 US Congressional leaders last week chastised India for discriminatory trade practices. In choosing this…

  • Commentary posted July 16, 2013 by Hans A. von Spakovsky Tuesday's First Strike on the Filibuster

    Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid is pushing hard to eliminate the filibuster for executive nominations, on the grounds that Republicans have stood in the way too many times and are refusing to confirm qualified nominees. What’s so striking about this reason is that it’s false. President Obama’s success rate with nominees is actually higher than that of his Republican…