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  • Commentary posted August 21, 2014 by Edwin J. Feulner, Ph.D. Intolerance on the left

    We often hear those on the right branded as “intolerant.” We’re all a bunch of extremists who just want to shut down the other side, right? We’re unlike those on the left, who welcome debate and want to give all viewpoints a respectful hearing. Or so we’re told. We might even start to believe it — until we encounter the oh-so-tolerant voices of our loyal opposition.…

  • Commentary posted August 20, 2014 by Edwin J. Feulner, Ph.D. A tale of two tax problems

    Thirty-three years ago this month, President Reagan picked up his executive signing pen and affixed his name to one of the most sweeping pieces of tax legislation in U.S. history: the Economic Recovery Tax Act of 1981. Rarely has any bill been more aptly named. The country had been pummeled for years at that point by the effects of “stagflation” and an economic malaise…

  • Commentary posted August 6, 2014 by Edwin J. Feulner, Ph.D. A National GPS Device

    You’ve no doubt seen those polls in which Americans are asked if they think our country is heading in the right direction. Perhaps you’ve even been asked that yourself. Whether the answer is yes or no, we all know it’s not scientific. It’s based on a general impression, and those impressions are shaped by what we read and see on the news, and on what we know is happening…

  • Commentary posted July 30, 2014 by Edwin J. Feulner, Ph.D. The Trouble with Banning Trans Fats

    Like many Americans, you probably think it’s up to you to determine how healthy your diet is. Well, the Food and Drug Administration has a different idea. You see, the FDA is gunning for the trans fats in your diet. Last year, the agency tentatively decided to revoke the status of partially hydrogenated oils as “Generally Recognized as Safe.” A recent FDA update notes…

  • Commentary posted July 23, 2014 by Edwin J. Feulner, Ph.D. Feds Stomping on our Stogies

    I’ll admit it. I enjoy an occasional cigar. So do a lot of other Americans. Some like to indulge in a pricier smoke, while others opt for a less-expensive brand. The ones made by the J.C. Newman Cigar Co. of Tampa, Fla., which retail for less than $10 apiece, fall into the latter category. J.C. Newman, which was founded by a Hungarian immigrant in 1895, uses 1930s…

  • Commentary posted July 22, 2014 by Edwin J. Feulner, Ph.D. A Healthy Blow to Labor Overreach

    The Service Employees International Union likes to present itself as the champion of the little guy. But officials of SEIU Healthcare — “the fastest-growing union of health care, child care, home care and nursing home workers in the Midwest” — aren’t averse to a little high living. For example, in fiscal 2013, officials of SEIU’s Illinois-Indiana health care division…

  • Commentary posted July 17, 2014 by Edwin J. Feulner, Ph.D. Remembering Richard Scaife, a Man of Ideas

    Much has been written about Richard M. Scaife since his death on July 4. It isn’t surprising. Dick was a man of high ideals and great accomplishment. You’ll find his name prominently displayed when you walk in the front door of the Heritage Foundation, and with good reason. Dick was an early supporter of Heritage, yes. But he was also a man of ideas — personal liberty…

  • Commentary posted July 15, 2014 by Edwin J. Feulner, Ph.D. Still the Exceptional Nation

    Americans hardly need an excuse to display the flag, but few occasions bring the red, white and blue out in fuller force than our national birthday. Jeane Kirkpatrick once said, “Americans need to face the truth about themselves, no matter how pleasant it is.” The truth is that the United States is an exceptional nation: It’s the world’s oldest and most stable capitalist…

  • Commentary posted June 30, 2014 by Edwin J. Feulner, Ph.D. Assessing the ‘Great Society’

    One of the lessons I learned in my first management course is you can’t improve something unless you can measure it. Let’s apply that to government. As ambitious government programs go, it’s hard to top the “Great Society,” which recently marked its 50th anniversary. President Lyndon Johnson, after all, vowed “to give every citizen an escape from the crushing weight of…

  • Commentary posted June 9, 2014 by Edwin J. Feulner, Ph.D. A Costly Way to Limit Free Speech

    Imagine if Congress passed and the president signed a law making it a crime to utter “false, scandalous and malicious” statements “against the government.” Do you think that would violate your right to free speech? Of course it would. It’s startling to realize that such a law was, in fact, enacted at one time. In 1798, to be specific. The Alien and Sedition Acts were…

  • Commentary posted June 2, 2014 by Edwin J. Feulner, Ph.D. Tiananmen Square, 25 years later

    It’s one of the most iconic images of the 20th century: a man standing perfectly still, facing a large tank as it bears down on him. He’s unarmed and alone. Defenseless — except for an unshakeable conviction that freedom is so important, it’s worth risking your life for. That is just what the man was doing when, on June 4, 1989, he joined thousands of other fellow…

  • Commentary posted May 23, 2014 by Edwin J. Feulner, Ph.D. The virtue behind Memorial Day

    If you were to sum up Memorial Day in one word, what would it be? For me, it would be “courage.” Courage means going forward, into the unknown, with no guarantee of success. It means moving out of your comfort zone and being willing to act boldly when the situation requires it. You couldn’t storm the beaches on D-Day, or accomplish your mission in the face of terrorist…

  • Commentary posted May 19, 2014 by Edwin J. Feulner, Ph.D. Inspiring patriotism that is ‘informed’

    Conservatives believe that America is an exceptional nation because, unlike any other nation, it is founded on an idea — the idea that “all men are created equal” and are endowed by their Creator with “certain unalienable rights,” among them life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. To secure these rights, a government is given “just powers from the consent of the…

  • Commentary posted May 12, 2014 by Edwin J. Feulner, Ph.D. How Reagan broke the ice at Reykjavik

    It is perhaps fitting that the Cold War finally began to crack apart in a place called Iceland. It was October 1986, and President Reagan flew to Reykjavik to meet Soviet Premier Mikhail Gorbachev. Our side didn’t expect much from the talks. They were intended to give the leaders a chance to get to know each other better and lay some groundwork for future talks, planned…

  • Commentary posted May 5, 2014 by Edwin J. Feulner, Ph.D. Reassuring anxious Asian allies

    President Obama’s most recent visit to Asia probably struck many Americans as simply the latest round of executive-level diplomacy — basically the kind of trip abroad that chief executives have been making for decades. He’s been to the region six times as president, after all — not much different than President Bush at a comparable point in his presidency. There was more…