• Heritage Action
  • More
  • Commentary posted September 30, 2014 by Edwin Meese III, Ryan T. Anderson Let States, Not Courts, Decide Marriage Policy

    On June 26 of last year, the Supreme Court struck down Section 3 of the federal Defense of Marriage Act in United States v. Windsor, and since then lower courts have issued a string of decisions redefining marriage in the states. This month, in a widely celebrated opinion written by Judge Richard Posner, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 7th Circuit declared that it had…

  • Commentary posted September 29, 2014 by Hans A. von Spakovsky Obama's Enforcer Resigns: Attorney General Holder One of Worst Officials Ever to Lead Justice Department

    Attorney General Eric Holder’s announcement Thursday that he is resigning, effective when his successor is confirmed, is welcome news.   As John Fund and I outline in our recent book, “Obama’s Enforcer: Eric Holder’s Justice Department,” every time President Obama has broken, bent, ignored or changed the law, the person at his side advising him how to do it has been…

  • Commentary posted September 25, 2014 by Hans A. von Spakovsky The Kansas Supremes Give Democrats Exactly What They Wanted...Again

    At almost the same time as my earlier NRO post was published this morning — asking why the Kansas Supreme Court had not acted on the second writ of mandamus filed last week, which requested that the Kansas Democratic party be ordered to name a replacement U.S. senate candidate — the court acted. But instead of taking up the matter as it promptly did with the first writ…

  • Commentary posted September 24, 2014 by Hans A. von Spakovsky The Kansas Supreme Court Gives Democrats What They Want—But the Fight May Not Be Over

    Late yesterday, the Kansas supreme court granted the writ of mandamus filed by former Democratic U.S. Senate candidate Chad Taylor and ordered Kansas secretary of state Kris Kobach to remove Taylor’s name from the November ballot. But the controversy may not yet be over because of another writ filed by a Democratic voter. The court dismissed Kobach’s claim (explained…

  • Commentary posted September 23, 2014 by Alden Abbott Enterprise Cities, Competition, and Economic Growth

    Shanker Singham of the Babson Global Institute (formerly a leading international trade lawyer and author of the most comprehensive one-volume work on the interplay between competition and international trade policy) has published a short article introducing the concept of “enterprise cities.”  This article, which outlines an incentives-based, market-oriented approach to…

  • Testimony posted September 22, 2014 by Hans A. von Spakovsky IRS Abuses: Ensuring that Targeting Never Happens Again

    Testimony before the House of Representatives, Committee on Oversight and Government Reform Introduction My name is Hans A. von Spakovsky.[1]   I am a Senior Legal Fellow in the Edwin Meese III Center for Legal and Judicial Studies at The Heritage Foundation. The views I express in this testimony are my own, and should not be construed as representing any official…

  • Issue Brief posted September 19, 2014 by Robert Gordon, Andrew Kloster Wage Garnishment Without a Court Order: Not a Good Idea

    Right before the July 4th holiday this year, the ‌Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a direct final rule entitled “Administrative Wage Garnishment.”[1] This rule sought to amend EPA standards for claims collections, implementing the wage garnishment provisions of the Debt Collection Improvement Act (DCIA) of 1996.[2] It did so by incorporating by reference a…

  • Commentary posted September 18, 2014 by Hans A. von Spakovsky The Injustice of Eric Holder

    Even we were shocked when we researched our new book, “Obama’s Enforcer: Eric Holder’s Justice Department,” at the extent to which Attorney General Eric Holder Jr. has politicized the Justice Department and put the interests of left-wing ideology and his political party ahead of the fair and impartial administration of justice. However, there is no doubt that the American…

  • Commentary posted September 18, 2014 by Todd F. Gaziano A Handy Guide to the Constitution is Reissued for Its Birthday

    On September 17, Americans will celebrate the 227th anniversary of the signing of the United States Constitution by the delegates to the Constitutional Convention. Convention President, George Washington, declared that it was “little short of a miracle” that deliberations were successfully concluded. Only three delegates who stayed to the end refused to sign the document…

  • Commentary posted September 18, 2014 by Hans A. von Spakovsky The Minutiae of Election Rules in the Kansas U.S. Senate Race

    The Kansas Supreme Court heard oral arguments this morning in the dispute over whether the state’s ballot will bear the name of the Democratic nominee for the U.S. Senate. The nominee, Shawnee County district attorney Chad Taylor, tried to withdraw from the ballot on September 3. With less than an hour to go before the deadline for withdrawal, he hand-delivered his…

  • Legal Memorandum posted September 18, 2014 by Elizabeth Slattery Overview of the U.S. Supreme Court’s October 2014 Term

    The Supreme Court of the United States begins its next term on October 6, 2014. The 2013 term featured a number of hot-button issues: campaign finance restrictions, racial preferences, pro-life speech outside abortion clinics, unions, legislative prayer, and a challenge to Obamacare’s Health and Human Services (HHS) mandate. Nearly two-thirds of the decisions were…

  • Commentary posted September 18, 2014 by Paul Rosenzweig, Brett D. Schaefer, James L. Gattuso Should Governments Control the Internet?

    The Internet is now critical to the U.S. economy. A recent Hudson Institute analysis estimated that the information, communications, and technology sector accounted for nearly 10 percent of the total growth of the U.S. economy from 2002 to 2007 – in other words, the sector was responsible for more than $340 billion of the $4.6 trillion increase in real gross output of the…

  • Commentary posted September 17, 2014 by Hans A. von Spakovsky Voter ID Wins Big in Wisconsin

    Voter-ID opponents have suffered another stunning blow. On Friday, the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals dissolved the injunction that had been issued against Wisconsin’s voter-ID law by a federal district court in April. The court told Wisconsin that it “may, if it wishes (and if it is appropriate under rules of state law), enforce the photo ID requirement in this…

  • Commentary posted September 16, 2014 by Hans A. von Spakovsky When Politics Drives Law Enforcement

    One of the biggest threats to a civilized, free society occurs when prosecutors abuse their power and allow politics to drive their administration of the criminal-justice system. Two recent examples show how liberal, partisan prosecutors misused their authority and politicized justice. In Fall River, Mass., the New York Times reports, a local county prosecutor, Sam…

  • Commentary posted September 10, 2014 by Hans A. von Spakovsky John Chisholm, other prosecutors put free speech at risk in John Doe case

    Oral arguments were heard Tuesday before the 7th Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals in O'Keefe vs. Chisholm, the so-called John Doe investigation in which local prosecutors in Wisconsin tried to criminalize political speech and activity on public issues. The 7th Circuit should uphold the lower court decision halting this Star Chamber investigation that violated basic First…