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  • Commentary posted March 27, 2014 by Luke Coffey After Crimea

    Not since the Cold War has Red Square hosted such an alarming spectacle. When Russian president Vladimir Putin gathered a crowd of thousands to celebrate his military annexation of Crimea last week, he demonstrated a now-familiar talent for merging stagecraft with statecraft. Flanked by four Jumbotrons and capped by the dubious proclamation “We are together,” Putin’s…

  • Commentary posted March 8, 2014 by Nile Gardiner, Ph.D. The crisis in Ukraine — America can be deferential no more

    The Obama administration's Russian reset, designed by then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, was premised on the idea of Russia as a partner with the United States. Hand in hand, the former rivals would address the major international crises of the day. This initiative will be remembered as one of the biggest foreign policy follies of the modern era — a staggeringly…

  • Commentary posted February 3, 2014 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Olympics’ edifice complex is ultimately a loser

    The Olympic Winter Games start Friday in Sochi, Russia. They were supposed to cost $12 billion, but the latest estimate is higher: more than $50 billion. Small wonder that, increasingly, the nations that want to host international sporting events are corrupt, publicity-seeking dictatorships or deluded Keynesians. We’ve been here before. The 1976 Summer Games in Montreal…

  • Commentary posted January 3, 2014 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. A ground game that could favor the U.S.

    As in the previous decade, freedom made little headway in 2013. Throughout that period, the United States has labored unsuccessfully to build free governments in the Middle East and Africa. In 2014, we should seek to promote freedom where the going may be easier. Freedom isn't retreating. But it isn't advancing either. Freedom House, a Washington-based advocacy group,…

  • Commentary posted November 23, 2013 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. UK needs freedom to pick talent from whole world

    Make no mistake, New York is a great city. I can’t visit it without a sense of ant-like awe. Yet while I respect New York, I love London. It’s gigantic, but it still feels like civilization on a human scale. I’ve been coming to Britain – not just London – regularly since 1989. But when I visited London again last month, I felt something different. New York is…

  • Commentary posted October 18, 2013 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Good news from Washington -- UN Arms Trade Treaty DOA in US Senate

    Sens. Jerry Moran (R-Kan.) and Joe Manchin (D-W.V.) released a bipartisan letter this week signed by 48 of their colleagues pledging to oppose the U.N. Arms Trade Treaty (ATT), which Secretary of State John Kerry signed on behalf of the United States in September. This letter makes it clear that the Senate will not ratify the treaty in the foreseeable future.…

  • Commentary posted October 7, 2013 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Flexible relations will help Britain achieve a more prosperous future

    In public policy, what starts as the unthinkable can first become simply the impossible, then the undesirable, then the possible, then the inevitable – and, finally, the right choice all along. Forty years ago, permanent British membership of the EEC – as it then was – appeared all but inevitable. Now it’s Britain’s exit that is well into the ‘possible’ stage, with…

  • Commentary posted September 27, 2013 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Jihad is the war that won't end

    All wars end eventually. But some don't end when and where you think they will. Take the civil war in Syria. When that conflict ends, the forces opposing Assad will move elsewhere, including to Europe. We may not want to intervene in Syria, but Syria is likely to intervene in us. In the Middle East, strong governments, like Iran's, are often bad. But an absence of…

  • Play Movie Does Obama Need Authorization to Strike Syria? Groves on CNN Video Recorded on September 8, 2013 Does Obama Need Authorization to Strike Syria? Groves on CNN

    Senior Research Fellow Steve Groves discusses whether President Obama needs Congressional authorization to strike Syria on CNN's 'Global Public Square.'…

  • Commentary posted July 19, 2013 by Brett D. Schaefer An Honor System That’s Not Always Reliable

    Diplomatic immunity is vital to the conduct of international diplomacy. But it can be abused. In New York City, for example, we frequently hear of diplomats flouting traffic laws and not paying their tickets. According to the New York City Department of Finance, unpaid tickets totaled $16.7 million through the end of July 2011. The most egregious countries were Egypt…

  • Commentary posted June 7, 2013 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. New Risks, Dangers Loom as UN Arms Trade Treaty Opens for Signature

    The U.N. Arms Trade Treaty (ATT) opens for signature on June 3. Well over 30 nations will sign it immediately, and the U.S. has announced it will follow suit. Once 50 signatories ratify the treaty, implementation begins 90 days later. And implementation will present new risks to the U.S. U.S. Assistant Secretary of State Tom Countryman insists implementation will bring…

  • Issue Brief posted May 16, 2013 by Brett D. Schaefer, Steven Groves U.N. Human Rights Experts: More Transparency and Accountability Required

    Recent statements by United Nations Human Rights Council Special Rapporteur Richard Falk rekindled a debate over how such experts should be held accountable when their behavior violates the conduct expected of them. Moreover, the scrutiny elicited by Falk’s statements has exposed the fact that funding for special procedures deserves more transparency, especially regarding…

  • Commentary posted April 26, 2013 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Barack Obama's Syrian 'Red Line' Comes Back to Trip Him

    The White House now believes Syrian strongman Bashar Assad has used the poison gas sarin against his own people. Last August, President Barack Obama called the use of chemical weapons a "red line." He now faces a hard choice: Admit his red line was phony or intervene in a conflict he has sought to avoid. The Syrian crisis is not just about sarin. Assad has killed more…

  • Commentary posted April 24, 2013 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. After Boston, Regard Vladimir Putin's Sympathy with Distrust

    Russian strongman Vladimir Putin expressed his sympathy for the victims of the Boston bombings last week. But make no mistake: Putin sees the bombings as an opportunity to rebuild relations with the United States on his terms. His crocodile tears shouldn't delude us into chasing a second "reset" in relations with Russia. After all, the first reset was one of the Obama…

  • Commentary posted April 16, 2013 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Margaret Thatcher's Lesson: To Triumph, Do Your Homework

    Margaret Thatcher, Britain's greatest prime minister since Winston Churchill, will be laid to rest Wednesday. In life, Thatcher never rested. American politicians, who have fallen into a bad habit of legislating for the camera, need to learn her habit of sweating the details instead. Thatcher believed that, in the end, you could only succeed by preparing and thinking. As…