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  • Backgrounder posted May 18, 2015 by John Grimsley, John S. O'Shea, M.D. The New Disease Classification (ICD-10): Doctors and Patients Will Pay

    On October 1, 2015, a new standardized system of classifying disease will be imposed on practicing physicians and others in the health care sector. The World Health Organization’s (WHO) International Classification of Diseases (ICD) is a system of diagnostic codes established for defining and reporting disease, identifying global health trends and collecting global…

  • Commentary posted May 5, 2015 by Robert E. Moffit, Ph.D. A Health Care Revolution on Private Exchanges?

    Employers, not politicians, can spark a health-care revolution. For many years employers have struggled with providing health insurance to workers and their families. Competing for high-skilled workers typically requires offering fairly comprehensive benefits (valued at an average of $6,000 for an individual in 2014). Public-sector employers — states and municipalities —…

  • Issue Brief posted May 4, 2015 by Edmund F. Haislmaier, Drew Gonshorowski Responding to King v. Burwell: Congress’s First Step Should Be to Remove Costly Mandates Driving Up Premiums

    The Supreme Court is expected to issue its decision in King v. Burwell before the end of June. Should the Court reject the Obama Administration’s regulatory interpretation of the provisions of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) at issue in the case, the Treasury would be barred from paying health insurance subsidies to individuals who obtained coverage thorough Healthcare.gov,…

  • Commentary posted April 21, 2015 by Robert E. Moffit, Ph.D., Paul Winfree Oops, Congress Failed Again: A Missed Opportunity to Fix Medicare

    The new Congress isn’t getting Washington’s crazy spending under control. In fact, it’s just made it worse. By enacting the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (H.R. 2), lawmakers yesterday increased the nation’s deficits by $141 billion over the next ten years and guaranteed even larger debt beyond that. So much for their formal commitments and resolutions to…

  • Commentary posted March 30, 2015 by Alyene Senger Are we better off now, five years into Obamacare?

    Obamacare just passed its fifth anniversary as a law, but don't be surprised if you didn't hear much about it. After all this time, polls show the public still doesn't like it. Results are more important than perception, of course. So let's ask: If Obamacare is measured on four important metrics - cost, coverage, competition and choice - are we better off now? Cost.…

  • Issue Brief posted March 30, 2015 by Edmund F. Haislmaier King v. Burwell: A Loss of Subsidy Does Not Mean a Loss of Coverage

    An important distinction is getting lost in commentary on the possible effects of a Supreme Court decision in the case of King v. Burwell. It is the distinction between how the Court’s ruling would affect “insurance subsidies” versus how it would affect “insurance coverage.” Should the Court reject the Obama Administration’s regulatory interpretation of the provisions of…

  • Issue Brief posted March 5, 2015 by Edmund F. Haislmaier King v. Burwell: What State Lawmakers Should Do

    State lawmakers—particularly those in states that would be affected by a Supreme Court ruling against the Obama Administration in the King case—should take steps to encourage Congress to put forth a legislative response to the case, specifically by exempting affected states from the costly Obamacare rules, regulations, and mandates.[1] Reject a State Exchange State…

  • Issue Brief posted February 27, 2015 by Nina Owcharenko, Edmund F. Haislmaier King v. Burwell: An Opportunity for Congress and the States to Clear Away Obamacare’s Failed Policies

    On March 4, the Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in King v. Burwell—a case challenging the Obama Administration’s IRS ruling granting premium support subsidies to those enrolled in federal exchanges under the Affordable Care Act (ACA). While a ruling against the Administration would preclude paying those subsidies to individuals who obtain coverage through the…

  • First Principles Series Report posted February 25, 2015 by Robert E. Moffit, Ph.D. Federalism and Freedom: Orestes Brownson’s Case for the Federal Constitution

    Over the past 100 years, conservatives and Progressives have battled over the meaning and relevance of the U.S. Constitution. Many of these disagreements have focused especially on the relationship between the federal government and the states. Progressives old and new have long dismissed states’ powers as annoying relics of a bygone era. Progressives assert that…

  • Issue Brief posted February 23, 2015 by Alyene Senger Eight Groups Harmed by the ACA’s Flawed Policies

    The Supreme Court will hear oral arguments on March 4 in the case of King v. Burwell—a challenge to an IRS rule under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) allowing the payment of premium subsidies to individuals enrolled in the federal exchange. Supporters of the ACA have made various claims about the harm that would supposedly occur were the court to find for the plaintiffs…

  • Issue Brief posted February 20, 2015 by Edmund F. Haislmaier Impact of King v. Burwell: The ACA’s Key Design Flaws

    On March 4, the Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in King v. Burwell, a challenge to an IRS ruling related to the Affordable Care Act (ACA) granting premium support subsidies to those enrolled in federal exchanges. While claims that a ruling in favor of King would disrupt coverage to millions,[1] it is important to recognize that the ultimate source of any…

  • Issue Brief posted February 20, 2015 by Edmund F. Haislmaier King v. Burwell: Assessing the Claimed Effects of a Decision for the Plaintiffs

    Should the Supreme Court rule in King v. Burwell—a case challenging the Obama Administration’s implementation of the premium tax credit provisions of the Affordable Care Act (ACA)—that the statute restricts the payment of premium tax credits only to individuals obtaining coverage “through an Exchange established by [a] State,” its ruling would preclude the Treasury paying…

  • Commentary posted February 3, 2015 by Robert E. Moffit, Ph.D. Memo to 114th Congress: First, repudiate Washington's ruling class

    The majority of newly elected members of Congress are men and women who ran and won in direct opposition to President Obama’s policies. But there is more to their victory than a triumph over liberal policies. The 2014 election also represents a repudiation of an attitude and style of governance that has become entrenched in Washington’s political culture:  an arrogant,…

  • Backgrounder posted January 29, 2015 by Edmund F. Haislmaier, Drew Gonshorowski Q3 2014 Health Insurance Enrollment: Employer Coverage Continues to Decline, Medicaid Keeps Growing

    During the third quarter (Q3) of 2014, enrollment in employer-sponsored coverage continued to decline, while Medicaid enrollment continued to grow. However, enrollment in individual-market plans—which substantially increased in both of the first two quarters—also declined by 357,000 during the third quarter. The net result was that total enrollment decreased by 160,000…

  • Issue Brief posted January 21, 2015 by Robert E. Moffit, Ph.D., Alyene Senger Replacing Medicare’s SGR: Four Bipartisan Options to Finance a Permanent Fix

    The new Congress must stop irresponsible federal spending. This applies to replacing the Medicare Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) formula that annually updates Medicare physician payment with a workable alternative. In 2014, House and Senate negotiators, representing three major congressional committees, worked long and hard to hammer out a compromise SGR replacement…