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  • Special Report posted December 7, 2016 by James M. Roberts, Huma Sattar South Asia: Regional Integration and Greater Economic Freedom Will Boost Growth and Prosperity

    South Asia is one of the fastest-growing regions in the world, with average gross domestic product (GDP) growth projected to be 7 percent in 2015 and well above 8 percent by 2020. India is the bright spot in the region, with 8 percent GDP growth projected by 2018, spurred by 12 percent growth in investment as the country continues to shift from consumption to…

  • Backgrounder posted November 23, 2016 by Bryan Riley, Ambassador Terry Miller 2017 Index of Economic Freedom: Trade and Prosperity at Risk

    The latest rankings of trade freedom around the world, developed by The Heritage Foundation in the forthcoming 2017 Index of Economic Freedom,[1] once again demonstrate that citizens of countries that embrace trade freedom are better off than those in countries that do not. The data continue to show a strong correlation between trade freedom and a variety of positive…

  • Backgrounder posted November 14, 2016 by Bryan Riley Trade and Prosperity in the States: The Case of Kansas

    International trade benefits Kansans in many ways. Imports provide competitive products for Kansas consumers and manufacturers. Exports benefit Kansas farmers and aerospace workers. Foreign investment supports thousands of Kansas jobs. These benefits are threatened by U.S. trade barriers that protect politically well-connected companies from competition while driving up…

  • Backgrounder posted November 14, 2016 by Tori K. Whiting Trade and Prosperity in the States: The Case of Missouri

    International trade and investment supports more than 800,000 jobs in Missouri, representing nearly a quarter of overall employment in the state. Businesses in Missouri, especially automotive suppliers, depend on affordable imports to increase their competitiveness in the international market. Foreign direct investment in Missouri actually supports more jobs than goods…

  • Commentary posted October 6, 2016 by Tori K. Whiting Feds Should End Protectionist Steel Tariffs

    Despite slow growth in the global economy, some countries — most notably China — are producing large amounts of steel. The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development estimated that global steelmaking capacity last year exceeded global demand by approximately 700 million metric tons. Foreign increases in capacity and production in the midst of a soft market…

  • Commentary posted October 4, 2016 by James M. Roberts Brexit Could Lift All Boats, If the EU Will Let It

    Fear-mongering pundits and politicians campaigning for the United Kingdom to remain in the European Union predicted dire consequences if British voters decided to leave. Developments in the months since Britain voted decisively to “Leave” prove that the Remain side alarmists were wrong. The pound dropped right after the Brexit vote, making British exports cheaper. U.K.…

  • Backgrounder posted September 12, 2016 by Tori K. Whiting The U.S. Steel Market Needs Free Trade, Not Favoritism

    Since 2012, the global economy has been experiencing average growth rates of less than 3 percent. As a result, demand for steel has weakened. Despite the procyclical nature of the global steel market, some nations, most notably China, are producing large amounts of steel, thereby driving down the price. In response to alleged unfair trade practices, domestic steel…

  • Commentary posted August 31, 2016 by Bryan Riley Trade With China Is a Net Plus for Americans

    “The China Shock: Learning from Labor Market Adjustment to Large Changes in Trade,” a scholarly paper that examines the impact of U.S. trade with China, has made quite a splash in policy circles. Media outlets hail it as “influential,” “famous,” “excellent,” and “a real bombshell.” And the Paulson Institute’s Damien Ma is right when says that “‘China Shock’ has driven a…

  • Special Report posted August 30, 2016 by James M. Roberts, William T. Wilson, Ph.D., Diane Katz, Anthony B. Kim, Bruce Klingner, David W. Kreutzer, Ph.D., Nicolas Loris, Joshua Meservey, Ambassador Terry Miller, Bryan Riley, Brett D. Schaefer 2017 Global Agenda for Economic Freedom

    Foreword The promotion of economic freedom at home and abroad is essential not only for a genuine and sustained revitalization of the U.S. economy, but also to strengthen U.S. national security. In 2010, the United States fell from the highest category of economically free countries (those with overall scores above 80) in the Index of Economic Freedom. It has been stuck…

  • Issue Brief posted August 22, 2016 by Anthony B. Kim, Ambassador Terry Miller Three Promising Areas for Greater U.S.–South Korean Economic Cooperation

    The United States and South Korea have put into place a framework for fruitful economic partnerships that are delivering measurable, concrete benefits for Americans and Koreans alike. Dynamic trade and investment activities have deepened and broadened the economic relationship, and the two longtime allies have much to gain if their governments work together to reinforce…

  • Backgrounder posted August 19, 2016 by Bryan Riley Trade and Prosperity in the States: The Case of Iowa

    Hundreds of thousands of Iowans rely on international trade and investment for their jobs. The benefits of international commerce used to be reflected in the voting record of the state’s congressional delegation, which overwhelmingly supported the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and the Uruguay Round trade agreement. However, support was split for more recent…

  • Backgrounder posted August 16, 2016 by Tori K. Whiting Trade and Prosperity in the States: The Case of Michigan

    Every Michigander remembers what the state’s economy looked like in 2010—715,000 people were out of work, and gross domestic product (GDP) had contracted by 7.6 percent by the time the recession ended. Many people were skeptical that free trade could help revive the economy, while others even blamed free trade for the state’s problems. Despite these doubts, support for…

  • Issue Brief posted August 9, 2016 by James M. Roberts, Diego Sánchez de la Cruz Post-Brexit: U.K. Can Lead Europe to Greater Economic Freedom

    Fear-mongering pundits and politicians campaigning for the “Remain” campaign had predicted dire consequences[1] for the United Kingdom if British voters decided to leave the European Union. Developments in the weeks following the June 23 decision by a solid majority to “Leave” have proven the Remain-side alarmists wrong. As “Vote Leave” proponent and Member of the…

  • Commentary posted June 15, 2016 by Bryan Riley The Jones Act: Protecting Special Interests, Not America

    When special interest groups want goodies from Congress, they’ll often cloak their pleas in the garb of “national security.” So nearly a century ago, Congress passed the Merchant Marine Act of 1920. And so it is today, as proponents of that law—which costs the U.S. economy $200 million a year—try to keep it in place. This protectionist measure, better known as the Jones…

  • Issue Brief posted May 17, 2016 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D., James M. Roberts, Riddhi Dasgupta, PhD Straight Talk on the ISDS Provisions in the Trans-Pacific Partnership

    The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), an investment and trade agreement signed last February between the U.S. and 11 other Pacific Rim nations, contains enforcement provisions, including an Investor-State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) mechanism, for resolving potential investment disputes related to the agreement. Today, the ISDS system is used widely around the globe to help…