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  • Commentary posted May 1, 2014 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. How War Starts

    Christopher Clark’s The Sleepwalkers is an important book, not only because it marks the centennial of when the great powers of the day took the world to war but also because it serves as a cautionary tale for the present. The world today is creeping uncomfortably close to the geostrategic chaos that marked the dawn of the 20th century. By the time Gavrilo Princip…

  • Commentary posted April 21, 2014 by Diane Katz A case for ending corporate welfare

    Authorization for the Export-Import Bank expires Sept. 30, and Congress must decide whether to renew the charter of the taxpayer-funded outfit. Proponents claim that “Ex-Im” is needed to fill gaps in private financing, which might sound plausible if not for the roster of monster corporations that pocket most of the subsidies. That list includes: • Boeing, the world’s…

  • Commentary posted April 21, 2014 by Edwin J. Feulner, Ph.D. Resisting the rising tide of regulations

    If you’re like most Americans, the phrase “the cost of government” brings to mind thoughts of spending programs and tax increases. There’s another way that government costs us money, though. It’s something that often flies under the radar; namely, regulations. Think they don’t affect you? They do. It doesn’t matter where you live, what size your income is, or whether you…

  • Commentary posted April 20, 2014 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. The limits of free trade

    Since the Second World War, the United States has carried the banner of free trade. It's not just a slogan: advancing economic freedom has been central to America's grand strategy. But recently, the limits of that strategy have become clear. No one believes in completely free trade. There is no free international market in dynamite, nor should there be. But the economic…

  • Commentary posted April 20, 2014 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. Respect the law and stop playing politics with immigration

    Herman Bottcher got around. Born in Landsberg, Germany, he immigrated to Australia with his uncle. Then, in 1930, he immigrated to the United States. Two years later he applied for "first papers," the right to U.S. citizenship. He was going to college in California when the Spanish Civil War broke out. That changed things for Bottcher. A hardcore leftist, he joined the…

  • Commentary posted April 18, 2014 by Salim Furth, Ph.D. Pay college athletes on the open market

    Division I college football players are professionals. They are given room, board and health care in exchange for their time, and served by tutors, coaches and trainers. They are paid only if they work. If a star receiver decided to focus on academics and scale back football practice, he would be dropped from the team and lose his scholarship. His “student” status is a…

  • Commentary posted April 17, 2014 by Stephen Moore Who Shrank the Deficit?

    A budget deficit of nearly half a trillion dollars is hardly something to cheer about, but the big decline in federal red ink as a share of our national output has been a stunning achievement. The new April budget update from the Congressional Budget Office tells us that, in 2009, Barack Obama and the Democrats rang up an elephantine $1.3 trillion deficit, which amounted…

  • Commentary posted April 16, 2014 by Rachel Greszler How the Paycheck Fairness Act Will Hurt Women

    As a working woman and mother of four young children, I strongly support fairness in the workplace. And that is why the Paycheck Fairness Act worries me. It would unintentionally harm working women by taking away some of the freedoms and choices we currently enjoy. The Paycheck Fairness Act seeks to equalize wages. Under the Act, employers would have to prove that any…

  • Commentary posted April 16, 2014 by Curtis S. Dubay Lawlessness in Chrysler Bankruptcy Still Hurts the Economy

    This month marks the fifth anniversary of the Chrysler bankruptcy. President Obama will doubtless mark the occasion by talking about how his intervention saved the auto company. More noteworthy, however, is how the lawlessness of that intervention created tremendous uncertainty, which still chills the economy today. Todd Zywicki has written an excellent summary of…

  • Commentary posted April 16, 2014 by Hans A. von Spakovsky Possible Judicial Bias in North Carolina Voter ID Case

    Remarks made by an associate justice of the North Carolina Supreme Court at a Democratic Party fund-raising dinner, as well as her membership in a private organization, raise serious questions about her possible bias against the state’s new voter ID law. Under applicable judicial ethics rules, she should remove herself from the controversial litigation challenging the law…

  • Commentary posted April 16, 2014 by David B. Muhlhausen, Ph.D. Wasteful Spending Continues Despite an ‘Evidence-based’ Policy Agenda

    In a New York Times Economix blog post, Laura D’Andrea Tyson, a former White House adviser to President Clinton, and Jonathan Greenblatt,  a current adviser to President Obama, assert that the Obama administration is responding to budgetary constraints by requiring “more evidence-based research on program performance and the reallocation of funds from less-effective…

  • Commentary posted April 15, 2014 by Elizabeth Slattery, Hans A. von Spakovsky Congress Can Help End Racial Discrimination

    The federal government wittingly and unwittingly endorses a great deal of racial discrimination in America. A 2011 report by the Congressional Research Service catalogued literally hundreds of government-wide and agency-specific set-aside and preference programs and grants throughout the entire executive branch that amount to some form of racial discrimination. If…

  • Commentary posted April 14, 2014 by Kim R. Holmes, Ph.D. Liberalism's illiberal intolerance

    Forget the Hunger Games. Welcome to the Intolerance Wars. Every day, it seems, someone tries to silence someone else in the name of some higher cause. The forced resignation of Brendan Eich as CEO of the popular Web browser Mozilla Firefox is only the tip of the iceberg. This goes beyond the familiar tit for tat of the culture wars. We are witnessing nothing less than a…

  • Commentary posted April 14, 2014 by Edwin J. Feulner, Ph.D. Toward a less taxing April 15

    Historically speaking, April 15 has never been a day marked by good fortune. The Titanic sank on that day in 1912 (after striking an iceberg shortly before midnight on April 14). Abraham Lincoln died after being mortally wounded the day before. And, of course, there’s Tax Day. “The income tax has made more liars out of the American people than golf has,” Will Rogers…

  • Commentary posted April 13, 2014 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. It's time for Congress to hit the 'reset' button on public diplomacy

    George Kennan knew a thing or two about how nations treat one another. In 1946, while serving as deputy chief of the U.S. mission in Moscow, he penned "the long telegram." That assessment of what motivated the Soviet Union shaped U.S. policy toward Moscow for decades. Later, at the new National War College, Kennan explained how "grand strategy" works. When nations…