• Heritage Action
  • More
  • 1-5 of 5
  • Backgrounder posted March 1, 2001 by Peter B. Sperry The Real Reagan Economic Record: Responsible and Successful Fiscal Policy

    See also: The Truth About Tax Rates and The Politics of Class Warfare by Daniel J. Mitchell, Ph.D. After President George W. Bush sent Congress an outline of his tax reform plan on February 8, some critics immediately began to attack it as a return to what they portray as the fiscally irresponsible policies of the Reagan Administration. According to…

  • Backgrounder posted February 7, 2001 by Peter B. Sperry Growing Surplus, Shrinking Debt: The Compelling Case For Tax CutsNow

    On January 16, President Bill Clinton transmitted to Congress his final budget blueprint for fiscal year (FY) 2002, arguing in the cover letter and commentary against reducing taxes for working Americans. According to the former President, "The favorable long-term budget results in these projections can be realized only with prudent policy--choosing continuing…

  • Commentary posted September 22, 2000 by Peter B. Sperry The Budget Battle Endgame

    With President Clinton's recent vetoes of legislation that would have eliminated the "marriage penalty" and the death tax, federal lawmakers are down to two options as they decide what to do with next year's $268 billion budget surplus. They can either use it to reduce the national debt, or they can spend it. The president has made his choice: more spending.…

  • Commentary posted June 30, 2000 by Peter B. Sperry Surplus, Debt and Temptation

    Most Americans believe that mounting federal budget surpluses will automatically go toward reducing the national debt. If only it were that simple. Unfortunately, there is nothing inevitable about debt reduction. In fact, many lawmakers - political rhetoric notwithstanding - are reluctant to use the surplus to pay down the debt. Yes, the House of Representatives…

  • Testimony posted June 8, 2000 by Peter B. Sperry Testimony on Corporate Welfare

    Mr. Chairman, thank you for inviting me here today to discuss corporate welfare. It should be noted that the following testimony is my own view and does not necessarily reflect that of The Heritage Foundation. I would like to focus on the Advanced Technology program as a singular example of corporate welfare that benefits no one, except the corporations receiving…

  • 1-5 of 5