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  • WebMemo posted January 22, 2004 by Dr. Nile Gardiner, James Phillips A Limited Role for the United Nations in Post-War Iraq

    The return of the United Nations to Iraq will be an important test of the world body's relevance in the post-Saddam era. Today the U.N. looks more like a glorified debating society than a serious global body designed to confront the world's growing threats and problems. An effective job by the U.N. in assisting with the electoral process in Iraq will help to restore…

  • Executive Memorandum posted April 30, 2003 by Dr. Nile Gardiner, Marc Miles, Ph.D. Forgive the Iraqi Debt

    The Bush Administration should formally call upon the European powers (primarily Russia, Germany, and France) and Arab nations (including the Gulf states and Egypt) to forgive the huge debts owed by the Iraqi government. Forgiving these debts would constitute both an historic contribution to the economic development of post-Saddam Iraq and a major gesture of support…

  • Commentary posted April 28, 2003 by Dr. Nile Gardiner, David B. Rivkin Limiting the U.N. in Iraq

    Numerous countries, including most members of the European Union, Russia, China and virtually all of the Group of Seven, or G7, major industrialized states, are clamoring for the United Nations to play a leading role in Iraq. Even some coalition partners, such as Britain, have been urging the United States to accord the United Nations considerable influence, mostly…

  • Commentary posted April 9, 2003 by Nile Gardiner, Ph.D., Dr. Nile Gardiner An U.N.-Helpful Plan for Iraq

    It sounds like the punch line to a bad joke. According to media reports, the U.N. Secretary-General's office has already drawn up detailed plans for the United Nations to step in and administer Iraq three months after the war ends. The confidential blueprint calls for setting up a U.N. "Assistance Mission" in Baghdad that would oversee a post-Saddam…

  • Commentary posted March 6, 2003 by Dr. Nile Gardiner, Dana Robert Dillon Asia's Tony Blair

    For a nation of just 20 million people, Australia is punching way above its weight on the international stage. With 2,000 Australian troops, together with navy frigates and fighter jets being deployed to the Persian Gulf, Australia is the only country that has so far offered substantial military units to fight alongside Great Britain and the United States in the…

  • Commentary posted March 6, 2003 by Nile Gardiner, Ph.D., Dr. Nile Gardiner Foiling Franco-German Folly

    According to French President Jacques Chirac, the United States is little more than a bully on the world stage, determined to intimidate all who fail to see the need to disarm Saddam Hussein. But we have nothing on Chirac, who can bully with the best of them when things don't go his way. Consider how he's using the pro-American sentiments voiced by certain…

  • Commentary posted January 31, 2003 by Nile Gardiner, Ph.D., Dr. Nile Gardiner New versus Old Europe: the Growing Coalition Against Saddam

    President Bush's State of the Union address to the American people was a damning indictment of the Iraqi regime. It was powerful, passionate and compelling. Even the most hardened critics of the Bush administration's foreign policy could not fail to have been moved by the President's graphic account of the brutalisation of the …

  • WebMemo posted January 10, 2003 by Dr. Nile Gardiner, John Hulsman Blair Must Not Go Wobbly On Iraq

    There is growing concern in Washington that the Prime Minister's resolve to deal with the Iraqi threat is starting to dramatically weaken. The recent comments by his foreign secretary Jack Straw that a war is increasingly unlikely raised eyebrows in the White House and Pentagon, where war planners are pushing ahead with preparations for a February offensive. The…

  • Commentary posted December 12, 2002 by Nile Gardiner, Ph.D., Dr. Nile Gardiner ed121202: The Right Side of History

    Still believe the conventional wisdom regarding a possible war with Iraq -- that the United States will be forced to "go it alone"? Then consider the case of France, who may well turn around and join America in removing Saddam Hussein from power. Yes, France. To be sure, Paris officials have made a near cottage industry out of criticizing Washington's approach…

  • Commentary posted November 26, 2002 by Joseph Loconte, Dr. Nile Gardiner ED112602:  Europe's New German Problem

    What Gerhard Schroeder proudly calls "the German way" is actually Europe's new German problem. It's become clear that Berlin's recent break with Washington over Iraq signals a fundamental clash of values. U.S. President George W. Bush and British Prime Minister Tony Blair agree on the nature of the Iraqi threat because they share bedrock convictions about the…

  • Commentary posted November 12, 2002 by Dr. Nile Gardiner, John C. Hulsman ED111202:  A Multi-Front War for Blair

    Britain's participation in any U.S.-led war on Iraq may seem a foregone conclusion, especially now that the U.N. Security Council has unanimously accepted a new U.N. resolution designed to disarm Iraq once and for all -- one that Britain helped the United States write. But before Prime Minister Tony Blair can lead Britain into war, he must slay two dragons in his…

  • Commentary posted November 1, 2002 by Dr. Nile Gardiner, Baker Spring ED110102b:  Germany Isolates Itself...Again

    To hear German officials tell it, it won't take long to heal the rift that developed between Washington and Berlin during Gerhard Schroeder's campaign for re-election as chancellor. "I'd be very surprised if we had a prolonged crisis of confidence," a senior German diplomat told The Washington Post. Adds Wolfgang Ischinger, Berlin's ambassador to the United States:…

  • Executive Summary posted October 30, 2002 by Dr. Nile Gardiner, Helle C. Dale Executive Summary: What Berlin Must Do to Repair the U.S.-German Alliance

    The reelection of Gerhard Schröder as Chancellor of Germany in September symbolized the end of an era in close post-war relations between Washington and Berlin. The Chancellor held on to power after his Social Democratic Party (SPD) ran a fiercely anti-American election campaign based on German opposition to U.S. policy with regard to Iraq and other issues. The…

  • Backgrounder posted October 30, 2002 by Dr. Nile Gardiner, Helle C. Dale What Berlin Must Do to Repair the U.S.-German Alliance

    The reelection of Gerhard Schröder as Chancellor of Germany in September has symbolized the end of an era in close post-war relations between Washington and Berlin. The Chancellor held on to power after his Social Democratic Party (SPD) ran a fiercely anti-American campaign based upon opposition to U.S. policy with regard to Iraq. The result has been immense harm to…

  • Backgrounder posted August 14, 2002 by Nile Gardiner, Ph.D., Dr. Nile Gardiner The Transatlantic Divide Over the Middle East: How the U.S. Should Respond

    In a landmark speech on June 24, President George W. Bush signaled that the United States was no longer willing to recognize the leadership of Yasser Arafat as effective in efforts to secure peace in the Arab-Israeli conflict.2 The President condemned Palestinian authorities for "encouraging, not opposing, terrorism" and called on the Palestinian people "to elect new…