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  • WebMemo posted March 4, 2010 by Daniella Markheim An Agenda That Fails to Promote Trade

    In the opening chapter of the 2010 Trade Policy Agenda and 2009 Annual Report, President Obama unveiled a trade agenda that aims to double U.S. exports within five years and create jobs.[1] Prominent on Obama’s trade to-do list is the implementation of the National Export Initiative (NEI), which will be directed by a new export promotion cabinet. This cabinet will…

  • WebMemo posted February 24, 2010 by Daniella Markheim Brazilian Retaliation Against U.S. Trade Violations: A Signal for Reform

    On March 1, Brazil will announce a list of retaliatory tariffs against U.S. goods—a response to the American government’s unwillingness to eliminate subsidies to domestic cotton producers. The World Trade Organization (WTO), in 2004 and again in 2005, deemed facets of America’s cotton program inconsistent with multilateral trade rules and U.S. commitments. The 2005…

  • WebMemo posted February 17, 2010 by Daniella Markheim Stop Zeroing in Anti-Dumping Investigations, Boost Trade

    In recent days, both Vietnam and the European Union have joined the ranks of countries either filing complaints or seeking sanctions against the United States within the World Trade Organization (WTO) in response to America’s practice of “zeroing” in anti-dumping investigations.[1] “Zeroing” artificially inflates dumping margins, increasing both the likelihood that the…

  • WebMemo posted February 12, 2010 by Daniella Markheim National Export Initiative Falls Short as a Winning U.S. Trade Policy

    On February 4, Commerce Secretary Gary Locke fleshed out the details of President Obama’s National Export Initiative (NEI), a plan unveiled in the 2010 State of the Union address that promises to double U.S. exports over the next five years and support 2 million American jobs.[1] The NEI aims to bolster U.S. international competitiveness by creating (1) an export…

  • WebMemo posted December 11, 2009 by Daniella Markheim Congress Should Renew Expiring Trade Preferences

    Unless Congress acts now, two important trade programs -- the Generalized System of Preferences (GSP) and the Andean Trade Preference Act (ATPA) -- will expire at the end of 2009. Because these trade programs make essential contributions to the economies of the countries that they favor while benefiting American businesses and consumers, the renewal process should be…

  • WebMemo posted December 10, 2009 by Daniella Markheim Time for Obama Administration to Get Serious About Trade Policy

    The World Trade Organization's (WTO) Seventh Ministerial Conference held earlier this month did little to spur progress on a global trade pact. While the ministerial was not billed as a negotiating round, and the struggling Doha Development Round was only one of several topics on the agenda, there was hope for a substantive assessment of where the round stood and how it…

  • WebMemo posted December 4, 2009 by Daniella Markheim America Should Follow Through with Trans-Pacific Partnership Trade Negotiations

    One positive outcome of President Obama's recent trip to Asia is a U.S. commitment to reengage in long-postponed negotiations to join the Trans-Pacific Economic Strategic Partnership (TPP).[1] Brunei, Chile, Singapore, and New Zealand -- the current members of the trade pact -- designed the TPP[2] to serve as a model trade agreement for the Asia-Pacific region. A key…

  • Special Report posted December 4, 2009 by Daniella Markheim Opportunity at Copenhagen -- Nations Should Promote Free Trade at the Climate Conference

    Abstract: Copenhagen 2009 -- yet another climate conference. Fortunately, this month's conference, which had been well on its way to renewing and reinforcing the controversial Kyoto Protocol on global warming, has lost much of its momentum. Worldwide economic downturn, uncertain U.S. climate policies, and the gap between developed and developing countries in climate…

  • Backgrounder posted September 28, 2009 by Daniella Markheim, Ambassador Terry Miller Global Trade Liberalization Continues, But Risks Abound

    Abstract: The 2010 rankings of trade freedom in countries around the world, developed by The Heritage Foundation as part of its annual Index of Economic Freedom, show many countries moving ahead on their own to lower tariffs and cut other barriers to trade. However, multilateral efforts at the World Trade Organization and elsewhere have ground to a halt. Global…

  • WebMemo posted July 6, 2009 by Daniella Markheim An Act to End Trade

    On June 24, 106 Members of Congress introduced the Trade Reform, Accountability, Development and Employment (TRADE) Act (H.R. 3012) as the vehicle for reshaping U.S. trade policy. Mandating additional reviews of current and potential trade agreements and adding a multitude of new exceptions, regulatory barriers, and other requirements, the act, if implemented, will…

  • Backgrounder posted July 1, 2009 by Daniella Markheim A Trade Agenda for the G-8 Summit in Italy

    Leaders from the U.S., France, Italy, Germany, Japan, Russia, Canada, and the United Kingdom are scheduled to meet July 8-10 in Italy for the latest G-8 summit meeting. Looming ever larger on the economic policy agenda is the state of global trade. With so many countries' economic well-being linked with others' through Trade and investment, a worldwide liberal…

  • WebMemo posted June 19, 2009 by Jack Spencer, Daniella Markheim Nuclear Energy Renaissance: Global Supply Chain Critical

    After years of policy wrangling and bureaucratic delays, the Department of Energy (DOE) has identified the four companies approved to receive federally backed loan guarantees to help finance the construction of new nuclear reactors in the U.S. All of the recipients have one thing in common: strong international connections. With protectionist sentiment on the rise,…

  • WebMemo posted June 16, 2009 by Daniella Markheim Energy Cap and Trade Threatens American Prosperity

    As the debate on climate change legislation moves forward, Members of Congress are diligently carving out exceptions and special benefits> for favored groups of voters. Of course, higher energy costs will hurt all of their constituents, but Members are working hard to soften the blow for those whose political support they enjoy or need. Of singular concern is…

  • WebMemo posted June 15, 2009 by Bruce Klingner, Daniella Markheim KORUS FTA Strengthens the U.S. Economy and Alliance with Korea

    During their June 16 summit, Presidents Barack Obama and Lee Myung-bak will discuss a daunting agenda filled with challenges. Though overshadowed by North Korean provocations, a critically important issue for both countries is reviving the Korea-U.S. free trade agreement (KORUS FTA). Although signed in June 2007, the agreement has yet to be ratified--shunned by the Obama…

  • WebMemo posted April 24, 2009 by Daniella Markheim Climate Policy: Free Trade Promotes a Cleaner Environment

    Regardless of the scientific merit behind doomsday predictions of global warming, President Obama and Congress seem intent on instituting a U.S. policy regime to address the specter of climate change. The debate on the most effective way to "green" America--cap-and-trade, carbon taxes, tough energy standards and regulations, some hybrid approach, or sticking to…