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  • Executive Memorandum posted April 10, 1997 by John Hillen Sunk In Helsinki: NATO After The Summit

    While Presidents Bill Clinton and Boris Yeltsin both proclaimed victory in their recent Helsinki summit, the NATO alliance may have been the loser. In fact, the future of NATO as the military alliance through which the United States protects its vital interests in Europe was greatly undermined by the Helsinki summit. U.S. negotiators made three major errors that…

  • Executive Memorandum posted January 17, 1997 by Baker Spring, John Hillen Why A Global Ban On Land Mines Won't Work

    A pressing humanitarian issue facing world leaders is the killing and maiming of civilians, often children, by unattended anti-personnel land mines (APLs). This horrible occurrence -- caused by the proliferation and indiscriminate use of these types of mines by rogue groups -- is unconscionable. It should be stopped. However, certain steps being considered by the…

  • Backgrounder posted October 15, 1996 by John Hillen Rethinking the Bosnia Bargain

    Visuals: Map: Current Implementation Force (IFOR) Deployment Table: Recommended Force Levels for IFOR II and Future Operations in Bosnia Introduction For the past nine months, over 35,0001 members of America's armed forces have been deployed as part of the NATO implementation force in Bosnia (IFOR). These soldiers were sent to the Balkans to…

  • Backgrounder posted May 2, 1996 by John Hillen American Military Intervention: A User's Guide

    Introduction Deciding when, where, and how to intervene with military force presents a truly perplexing set of questions. In a post-Cold War world, with no overriding threat to serve as the focus for American national strategy, it is even more difficult to decide when, where, and how to use the U.S.'s limited military resources. In this increasingly uncertain…

  • Backgrounder posted May 2, 1996 by John Hillen American Military Intervention: A User's Guide

    INTRODUCTION Deciding when, where, and how to intervene with military force presents a truly perplexing set of questions. In a post-Cold War world, with no overriding threat to serve as the focus for American national strategy, it is even more difficult to decide when, where, and how to use the U.S.'s limited military resources. In this increasingly uncertain…

  • Backgrounder posted February 7, 1996 by John Hillen Getting NATO Back to Basics

    Introduction Ever since the Cold War ended, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization has been in the midst of an identity crisis. When it lost the Soviet threat in the early 1990s, the Atlantic alliance went on a search to redefine itself. There have been many stops on this inchoate journey of redefinition. The Bush Administration used NATO forces, structure, and…

  • Backgrounder posted November 30, 1995 by John Hillen Questioning the Bosnia Peace Plan

    Introduction The recent conclusion of a Bosnian peace accord is a welcome development in a brutal conflict that has raged unchecked for four years. However, there are very serious questions that need to be answered about the political viability of the accord and the effectiveness of the American military intervention to implement it. In his nationally televised…

  • Executive Memorandum posted October 23, 1995 by John Hillen Clinton Fails to Make the Case For American Troops in Bosnia

    The Clinton Administration's plan to use 25,000 American troops to implement a Bosnian peace accord is being exposed as a haphazard and risky enterprise. In hearings on Capitol Hill last week, members of the Senate and House questioned the political and military rationale behind the Bosnia peace plan deployment. These questions focused on the mission's political…

  • Commentary posted October 19, 1995 by John Hillen ED101995a: Administration Fails to Make Case for U.S. Troops in Bosnia

    On Oct. 17, hearings on Capitol Hill exposed the Clinton administration's plan to use 25,000 American troops to implement a Bosnian peace accord as a haphazard and risky enterprise with no coherent political or military rationale. Lawmakers repeatedly challenged members of the Clinton foreign policy team to present clearly defined, attainable political goals and…

  • FYI posted October 11, 1995 by John Hillen Conditions for Sending U.S. Troops to Bosnia

    (Archived document, may contain errors) October 11, 1995 CONDITIONS FOR SENDING U.S. TROOPS TO BOSNIA By John Hillen Policy Analyst The President has promised to send 25,000 U.S. troops to Bosnia to police a peace settlement. He should not do so without the approval of Congress. Any operation as risky and potentially long- reaching as this one demands the full…

  • Backgrounder Update posted October 10, 1995 by John Hillen The Risks of Clinton's Bosnia Peace Plan

    (Archived document, may contain errors) 10/10/95 262 THE RISKS OF CLINTON'S BOSNIA PEACE PLAN (Updating Backgrounder Update No. 250, "Clinton's Bosnia Folly," June 2, 1995, and Backgrounder No. 10 12, "Don't Let Bosnia Destroy NATO," December 28, 1994.) The impending diplomatic breakthrough in the Balkans has raised the prospect of a substantial Ameri- can and…

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