• Heritage Action
  • Heritage Libertad
  • More
  • Backgrounder posted November 20, 2013 by Kathryn Nix What Obamacare’s Pay-For-Performance Programs Mean for Health Care Quality

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) of 2010 creates several new Medicare programs intended to improve health care quality, using “pay-for-performance” payment strategies to put financial pressure on medical providers. In such programs, reimbursement reflects provider performance on quality metrics based on adherence to certain care processes, scores on…

  • Commentary posted August 15, 2012 by Kathryn Nix Obamacare Undermines Physicians, Quality of Care

    The Association of American Medical Colleges projects a shortage of 63,000 physicians within the next few years. But rather than encourage doctors to continue practicing medicine, President Obama's health law will do exactly the opposite. While the bill was being debated, the American Medical Association advocated two big policy changes. First, it asked that Congress…

  • Issue Brief posted July 27, 2012 by Kathryn Nix Ten Ways Obamacare Limits Patient Choice

    In the wake of the Supreme Court’s ruling on Obamacare, Americans should remember that higher taxes are not the only negative consequence of the law. Obamacare limits patient choice through expansive federal regulation of the insurance market, government interference in the decisions patients make with their doctors, and increased dependence on government health programs.…

  • Commentary posted July 24, 2012 by Kathryn Nix Better Health Care Through Innovation

    Obamacare was sold, in part, on the promise that it would improve the quality of medical treatment and reduce costs through better care coordination and disease management. For the Medicare program in particular, this was to be accomplished primarily through the creation of Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs). Small wonder, then, that earlier this month the…

  • Backgrounder posted July 18, 2012 by Kathryn Nix Turning Medicare into True Social Insurance

    Abstract: Many retired Americans believe that they have already paid for their Medicare benefits. Their benefits, though, are not funded by the payroll taxes they paid during their working years—but mostly by payroll tax revenues from current workers. As a result, the Medicare program faces huge structural deficits, and seniors face automatic benefit reductions in…

  • Commentary posted July 18, 2012 by Kathryn Nix How to Bend the Health Care Cost Curve

    The good news: Two recent studies show that some types of health insurance are succeeding at containing health care costs without sacrificing quality of care. The bad news: Rules and restrictions in Obamacare undercut these plans and could drive them out of the marketplace. So much for “bending the health spending curve down.” What’s working so well to hold down…

  • Center for Policy Innovation Research Summary posted July 9, 2012 by Kathryn Nix, Alyene Senger The Promise of Consumer-Directed Health Plans: Studies Show Success at Reducing Costs and Maintaining Quality

    Abstract: Over the past decade, the use of consumer-directed health plans (CDHPs) has increased substantially. In 2006, Indiana introduced plans with health savings accounts as a coverage option for state employees. A case study by Mercer Health and Benefits LLC, a leading consulting firm, examined the outcome of Indiana’s implementation and found generous cost…

  • Issue Brief posted June 6, 2012 by Kathryn Nix But Wait, It Gets Worse: The Medicare Actuary’s Realistic Outlook for the Program

    Earlier this month, the Medicare trustees released their annual report on Medicare’s financial condition. The report did not offer much in the way of news—Medicare still faces a dismal future. But the really bad news came when Medicare’s Office of the Actuary released its alternative analysis. This report, based on more realistic assumptions, shows the program’s condition…

  • Backgrounder posted April 12, 2012 by Kathryn Nix Comparative Effectiveness Research Under Obamacare: A Slippery Slope to Health Care Rationing

    Abstract: One element of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) is the advancement of “comparative effectiveness research” (CER). Intended to compare available treatment options, CER can benefit patients if used for informational purposes only, but it could also be harmful in practice. The expansion of the Medicare bureaucracy under the PPACA will allow…

  • Play Movie Kathryn Nix on Over-Treatment on WKTV Video Recorded on April 4, 2012 Kathryn Nix on Over-Treatment on WKTV

    Kathryn Nix comments on medical over-treatment on WKTV…

  • Backgrounder posted March 21, 2012 by Nina Owcharenko, Kathryn Nix The Obamacare Two-Year Checkup: More Reasons for Repeal

    Abstract: On its second anniversary, Obamacare remains unpopular. The provisions currently in effect have fallen short of expectations and disrupted the market, causing even greater uncertainty for the future. Overall, Obamacare has increased government control of Americans’ health care choices and limited consumer choice. The recent controversy over the preventive care…

  • WebMemo posted January 26, 2012 by Kathryn Nix Inside the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute: No Promise of Protection from Government Rationing

    The much-awaited release of the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute’s (PCORI) priorities and research agenda lacks specifics and fails to answer concerns that its research findings will ultimately be used to limit treatment options. The PCORI was created in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) to advance comparative effectiveness research…

  • Center for Policy Innovation Research Summary posted January 11, 2012 by Kathryn Nix How Competition Improves Quality: The Case of Medicare Advantage

    Abstract: In 2003, the Medicare Modernization Act created the Medicare Advantage program, which allowed seniors to choose coverage from private health plans. Both recent research published in The American Journal of Managed Care by Niall Brennan and Mark Shepard and another analysis by America’s Health Insurance Plans use HEDIS measures and…

  • WebMemo posted December 21, 2011 by Kathryn Nix How Medicare Price Controls Have Contributed to Drug Shortages

    Recent drug shortages have received national attention as patients are forced to wait for vital treatments or substitute an alternative. As Congress searches for policy solutions, it is crucial that lawmakers understand the role that government price controls, specifically in Medicare, have played in the crisis. A Growing Problem According to the…

  • Backgrounder posted November 30, 2011 by Kathryn Nix Government Price Controls for Health Care: A Deficit-Reduction Strategy to Avoid

    Abstract: The Joint Select Committee on Deficit Reduction—the “Super Committee”—created under the Budget Control Act of 2011 has failed to recommend a strategy for reducing the federal deficit by $1.2 trillion over the next decade, leaving automatic cuts of 2 percent on the table for Medicare, other domestic programs, and national security and defense budgets. Rather than…