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  • Executive Memorandum posted October 23, 2006 by Ana I. Eiras, Stephen Johnson Promote Andean Free Trade But Limit Preferences

    In 2004, the United States began negotiating free trade agreements (FTAs) with Colombia, Peru, Bolivia, and Ecuador. These were intended to replace the limited, temporary preferences granted to certain South American countries under the Andean Trade Promotion and Drug Eradication Act (ATPDEA). Peru and Colombia have signed bilateral trade pro­motion agreements with…

  • WebMemo posted September 14, 2006 by Ana I. Eiras Reforms for the World Bank and International Monetary Fund

    Next week, when the two most important international financial institutions, the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund (IMF), meet in Singapore, they will have to face two key questions. The IMF must ask what it can do to make itself relevant in a crisis-free world. The World Bank must ask how it can deliver foreign aid more effectively. Can the IMF…

  • WebMemo posted July 24, 2006 by Ana I. Eiras, Stephen Johnson Six Strategic Reasons to Support a U.S.-Peru Free Trade Agreement

    Populist nationalism emanating from Venezuela seeks to counter U.S. influence in Latin America, while Chinese deal-making is undermining the region's slow evolution towards market-based economies. At the same time, congressional opponents of the Bush Administration are eager to block trade agreements to hand the President an election-year defeat. But failure to…

  • WebMemo posted July 12, 2006 by Ana I. Eiras, Stephen Johnson Congress Should Advance U.S.-Peruvian Free Trade Ties

    On April 12, the United States and Peru concluded negotiations for the United States-Peru Trade Promotion Agreement, a major advance in economic and security relations between the U.S. and Latin America's fifth most populous country. Peru's legislature has already approved the deal, and it now awaits action in the U.S. Congress. Economically, this free trade…

  • Executive Memorandum posted June 13, 2006 by Stephen Johnson, Ana I. Eiras Consolidate U.S.-Uruguay Trade Ties Now

    Sometimes good things come in small packages. The recently negotiated bilateral investment treaty (BIT) with Uruguay is a case in point. Not only would it strengthen investment and commerce between the United States and this friendly South American nation of 3.4 million people, but it could also help to advance economic freedom in other parts of the continent at a…

  • Lecture posted April 28, 2006 by Ana I. Eiras Women and Development: Empowerment Through Economic Freedom

    It is my great honor to speak to all of you today about the status of women around the world. When I was asked to address the issue of how different eco­nomic policies affect women, their families, and their possibility to prosper, I got very excited because I think that, in many ways, my own life experience shows how opportunity is all that people need- women…

  • Backgrounder posted April 17, 2006 by Ana I. Eiras The Senate's Blank Check to International Financial Institutions

    Supporters of the Multilateral Debt Relief Act of 2005 (S. 1320)[1] are gearing up to push it through the legislative process. However, S. 1320 would effec­tively write a blank check to international financial institutions (IFIs), such as the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund, and turn a blind eye to their irresponsible lending practices. It would also…

  • Backgrounder posted January 4, 2006 by Ana I. Eiras The Fiscal Burden of Government Is Undercutting U.S. Competitiveness

    A competitive economy is at the heart of a country's prosperity. Only by producing products or services at or below world prices can countries create wealth. The freedom to access a variety of capital instru­ments, to hire and fire labor, and to keep the profits of efforts and innovation enhances the economy's poten­tial for growth and wealth creation. For…

  • WebMemo posted November 14, 2005 by Ana I. Eiras Unconditional Debt Relief Is a Big Mistake

    As the Senate attempts to clear its docket of unfinished bills, the chamber's Leadership seeks to bring S. 1320, the Multilateral Debt Relief Act of 2005, to a vote. The bill's sponsors believe that heavily indebted poor countries (HIPCs) bear too huge a debt burden to spark growth and leave poverty behind while paying back their multilateral lenders. Their bill…

  • Backgrounder posted September 16, 2005 by Ana I. Eiras Time for the International Monetary Fund and World Bank to Reconsider the Strategy for Millennium Development Goals

    Every September, the Board of Governors of the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund (IMF) meets to discuss their role, work, and strategy to reduce poverty and preserve global financial stability. The discussions this year will center on the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and the Monterrey Consensus to encourage developing countries to increase…

  • Backgrounder posted June 2, 2005 by Brett D. Schaefer, Ana I. Eiras A Blueprint for Paul Wolfowitz at the World Bank

    When Paul Wolfowitz takes over the presidency of the World Bank this month, he will face the challeng­ing task of turning the World Bank into a more trans­parent, more accountable, and more effective organization. Despite its good intentions and hun­dreds of billions of dollars in development assistance over five decades, the Bretton Woods institution has failed to…

  • Backgrounder posted April 20, 2005 by Ana I. Eiras The Democratic Benefits of a Free Trade Agreement with CentralAmerica

    Increasing economic opportunity and strengthen­ing homeland security are two of the U.S. govern­ment's major goals. Advancing free trade is essential to reaching both of these goals. Hence, the Bush Administration and Congress should be praised for significantly advancing free trade with Australia, Morocco, Chile, and Singapore. Now the United States has an…

  • Backgrounder posted January 11, 2005 by Ana I. Eiras Four Reforms to Regain U.S. Leadership in Economic Freedom

    If there is one thing about America that inspires the rest of the world, it is its level of economic freedom. Or at least it used to. According to the just-released 2005 Index of Economic Freedom, published jointly by The Heritage Foundation and The Wall Street Journal, the United States is no longer among the world's 10 freest economies. In fact, the United States is…

  • Backgrounder posted July 23, 2004 by Ana I. Eiras The United States is No Longer the Champion of Economic Freedom

    We Americans love to be champions: champions of the Olympics, champions of democracy, champions of the world. For the most part, we are pretty good at it. However, for the last 10 years, America has been losing the championship of economic freedom. According to the 2004 Index of Economic Freedom,1 published by The Heritage Foundation and The Wall Street Journal,…

  • Backgrounder posted May 24, 2004 by Ana I. Eiras Why America Needs to Support Free Trade

    Free trade is again under attack, despite having been, for over a century, the basis of America's wealth. Some groups in the United States blame free trade for the loss of manufacturing jobs, while others blame it for exposing some U.S. producers to foreign competition. Free trade, however, is good for America, and for a very simple reason: It allows…