• Heritage Action
  • More
  • Issue Brief posted June 16, 2016 by David W. Kreutzer, Ph.D. Discounting Climate Costs

    Economic analysis of climate change and climate policies is fraught with many problems. Uncertainty and imprecision surround fundamental scientific and economic factors, such as, for example, how much warming will result from a doubling of carbon-dioxide (CO2) levels and how much damage is done by a given change in average world temperature. This paper addresses the…

  • Backgrounder posted April 22, 2016 by David W. Kreutzer, Ph.D., Nicolas Loris, Katie Tubb, Kevin D. Dayaratna, Ph.D. The State of Climate Science: No Justification for Extreme Policies

    Hysteria over global warming is now pervasive in the federal government, driving not just the Obama Administration’s energy and environmental policies, but also those of nearly every federal department and agency.[1] Throughout his term in office, President Obama consistently has said that policy action to combat man-made global warming is imperative and urgent. On the…

  • Backgrounder posted April 13, 2016 by Kevin D. Dayaratna, Ph.D., Nicolas Loris, David W. Kreutzer, Ph.D. Consequences of Paris Protocol: Devastating Economic Costs, Essentially Zero Environmental Benefits

    During the 2015 United Nations Climate Change Conference in Paris, President Barack Obama met with world leaders from around the globe to discuss plans to combat climate change. The general consensus from the summit was that the use of natural resources, such as coal, oil, and natural gas—which provide 80 percent of the world’s energy needs—should be avoided. Furthermore,…

  • Backgrounder posted March 4, 2016 by Salim Furth, Ph.D., David W. Kreutzer, Ph.D. Fuel Economy Standards Are a Costly Mistake

    The Obama Administration’s regulations intended to force very rapid increases in vehicle fuel economy are adding thousands of dollars to the prices of new cars. Vehicle prices are rising in ways that are consistent with the predictions of studies undertaken several years ago. It is likely that the regulations are adding at least $3,800 (perhaps much more) to the average…

  • Commentary posted July 7, 2015 by David W. Kreutzer, Ph.D. Bureaucrats rarely give consumers what they want

    The guiding fiscal principle of President Obama’s 2009 Stimulus Package was simple: “spend it as fast as you can.” Programs operating under that principle are almost predestined to flunk a cost-benefit test — and the federal Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) has proved to be no exception. University of Chicago researchers have documented that WAP is yet another…

  • Commentary posted April 14, 2015 by David W. Kreutzer, Ph.D. Nebraska: The latest proxy battleground for the war on affordable energy

    I had the privilege of serving as mayor in the small, Shenandoah Valley town where my wife and I raised our children. So, I am keenly aware of concerns about powerful out-of-state or out-of-area interests trying to take advantage of a rural population. The Nebraskan battles over the KXL Pipeline and the Terex injection well may be cases of the private-jet set using those…

  • Commentary posted March 3, 2015 by David W. Kreutzer, Ph.D. Australia’s wind-power market deflates

    If you are sailing miles from shore and come upon the rusted prows of sunken ships, you can be sure that water is not that deep and it would be a good idea to change course. Australia is just the latest ship’s prow to warn us away from the treacherous path of green-energy mandates, taxes, and subsidies. Among the others have been Germany, Spain, and Italy. Earlier this…

  • Commentary posted March 3, 2015 by David W. Kreutzer, Ph.D. President Barack Obama's plan to kill jobs

    Any Wisconsinites starting to wonder whether they are living through The Long Winter as described by Laura Ingalls Wilder, will find no comfort in President Barack Obama's plans to cut the use of our most affordable and reliable sources of energy. Though we may not be relegated to heating our homes by burning twisted bundles of straw, the president's plans to restrict use…

  • Backgrounder posted February 17, 2015 by Kevin D. Dayaratna, Ph.D., Nicolas Loris, David W. Kreutzer, Ph.D. The Obama Administration’s Climate Agenda Will Hit Manufacturing Hard: A State-by-State Analysis

    In an earlier study, we examined the economic impact of climate change–related regulations at the national level and found devastating job losses over the course of the next two decades. In this study, we quantify this impact by state and congressional district. Not surprisingly, we find that all states would suffer from this policy. Given these results and the…

  • Testimony posted November 17, 2014 by David W. Kreutzer, Ph.D. Impacts of Carbon Taxes on the US Economy

    LEGISLATIVE TESTIMONY The Impacts of Carbon Taxes on the U.S. Economy Testimony before Committee on Finance United States Senate September 16, 2014 David W. Kreutzer, Ph.D. Research Fellow in Energy Economics and Climate Change The Heritage Foundation My name is David Kreutzer. I am Research Fellow in Energy Economics and Climate Change at The Heritage Foundation.…

  • Backgrounder posted November 13, 2014 by Kevin D. Dayaratna, Ph.D., Nicolas Loris, David W. Kreutzer, Ph.D. The Obama Administration’s Climate Agenda: Underestimated Costs and Exaggerated Benefits

    W‌hen his climate cap-and-trade bill was defeated in the Democrat-controlled Senate, President Barack Obama noted there were other ways of “skinning the cat.”[1] Now we know that his chosen way is an onslaught of mandates, regulations, and possibly taxes directed primarily by the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The indicator…

  • Commentary posted April 30, 2014 by Kevin D. Dayaratna, Ph.D., David W. Kreutzer, Ph.D. Test-Driving the EPA's Carbon Models

    When you switch on the kitchen light tonight, how will it affect Captain James T. Kirk and the intrepid crew of the Starship Enterprise? Captain Kirk is a fictional character, of course, but the question -- thanks to the EPA -- is all too real. The agency calls it the "Social Cost of Carbon." In the SCC they claim to have an estimate, measured in dollars per ton of CO2,…

  • Backgrounder posted April 29, 2014 by Kevin D. Dayaratna, Ph.D., David W. Kreutzer, Ph.D. Unfounded FUND: Yet Another EPA Model Not Ready for the Big Game

    Unable to enact cap-and-trade legislation, even when he was supported by filibuster-proof majorities in Congress, President Barack Obama famously claimed, “Cap and trade was just one way of skinning the cat; it was not the only way.”[1] The primary alternative way to skin the cat is regulation by federal agencies, especially by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). A…

  • Backgrounder posted December 5, 2013 by Nicolas Loris, Kevin D. Dayaratna, Ph.D., David W. Kreutzer, Ph.D. EPA Power Plant Regulations: A Backdoor Energy Tax

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has re-proposed its desired regulation of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for future power plants. The agency also plans to finalize standards for existing plants by summer 2015. If implemented and combined with other proposed and newly implemented regulations, these GHG regulations would significantly…

  • Backgrounder posted November 21, 2013 by Kevin D. Dayaratna, Ph.D., David W. Kreutzer, Ph.D. Loaded DICE: An EPA Model Not Ready for the Big Game

    The “social cost of carbon” (SCC) is a metric used by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to quantify the economic impact associated with carbon emissions.[1] The EPA uses three statistical models to estimate the SCC: FUND (Climate Framework for Uncertainty, Negotiation and Distribution), DICE (Dynamic Integrated Climate-Economy), and PAGE (Policy Analysis of the…