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  • Makers of American Political Thought Series posted June 4, 2013 by Steven Hayward Ronald Reagan: Conservative Statesman

    Ronald Reagan, the 40th President of the United States, is perhaps the second most popular and consequential Republican President after Abraham Lincoln. Like Lincoln, the Great Emancipator, Reagan’s careful rhetorical style proved deeply persuasive to the American people and earned him the name of “Great Communicator.” Elected during a moment of national self-doubt and…

  • Lecture posted January 26, 2012 by Edwin Meese III, Lee Edwards, Ph.D., James C. Miller III, Steven Hayward A Constitutional President: Ronald Reagan and the Founding

    Abstract: Throughout his presidency, Ronald Reagan was guided by the principles of the American founding, especially the idea of ordered liberty. In the opening of his first inaugural address in 1981, President Reagan echoed the preamble of the Constitution, calling on the country’s citizens to “preserve this last and greatest bastion of freedom.” Eight years later, in…

  • Commentary posted November 2, 2000 by Steven Hayward A Sprawling Discontent

    Many voters across the nation are paying close attention to an issue barely mentioned in the presidential debates: "urban sprawl." Vice President Al Gore has endorsed plans to build more transit lines and encourage "smart growth," and the Sierra Club is running an $8 million ad campaign to support anti-sprawl candidates in key congressional races. But the concern…

  • Backgrounder posted September 13, 2000 by Steven Hayward "Growing Pains": The NGA's Flawed Report on Sprawl

    The debate over urban sprawl is a healthy sign of Americans' enduring desire for self-renewal. As such, it is ultimately a national discussion about how to live "the good life" in an affluent democracy. At its core, the debate over "sprawl"--which often masquerades as a dispute over technical concerns about traffic congestion, mass transit use, population density,…

  • Commentary posted May 18, 2000 by Steven Hayward The Paving of America?

    To hear the critics of urban sprawl tell it, every new housing development means we're "running out of farmland." Every new strip mall puts us one step closer to "the paving of America." The danger occurs when these clichés become the basis of public policy. Sound thinking about land use requires putting sprawl in its proper perspective. Start with a simple fact:…

  • Commentary posted February 26, 1998 by Steven Hayward A Victim of Political Correctness

    The Winter 1998 issue of The American Scholar is on newsstands now. It's worth picking up, for it marks the end of a fine journal. Its exemplary editor for 24 years, Joseph Epstein, is being shown the door for not being politically correct. The American Scholar is the official journal of the Phi Beta Kappa Society, and readers have delighted in its…

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