• Heritage Action
  • More
  • Backgrounder posted November 16, 2016 by Katie Tubb, Nicolas Loris Five Reasons to Sunset the Land and Water Conservation Fund

    The U.S. Senate and House of Representatives have begun conferencing energy legislation that is fraught with unnecessary government intervention into private-sector economic and environmental affairs. One major point of contention in the Senate’s version is the permanent reauthorization of the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF). The original intention of the LWCF was…

  • Backgrounder posted November 16, 2016 by Nicolas Loris, Katie Tubb Allow Energy Tax Credits to Expire

    Two dozen technology-specific, energy-related tax provisions expire at the end of 2016, including subsidies in the form of tax credits for coal, natural gas, renewable energy, and energy efficiency.[1] By transferring the tax burden from these politically connected industries to everyday Americans, Washington is not only increasing unfairness in the tax code but also…

  • Backgrounder posted October 24, 2016 by Nicolas Loris, Katie Tubb Colorado’s Discovery of Massive Oil and Gas Reserves: A Case for Local Energy and Environment Policy

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) discovered this past June that Colorado has 40 times more technically recoverable natural gas resources than previously estimated. The discovery makes Colorado’s Mancos Shale in the Piceance Basin the second-largest known shale reserve in the country (after Pennsylvania), assessed by the USGS with over 66 trillion cubic feet of gas, 74…

  • Commentary posted September 21, 2016 by Nicolas Loris, Katie Tubb Getting Sucker Punched by Energy Efficiency Regulations

    You have houseguests and you may not even know it. Indeed, they can be found in virtually every room of your home. We’re referring to federal regulators. They’re determined to reduce your energy use, no matter how much it costs you or takes decisions out of your hands. Take a look around your kitchen. Many appliances are regulated by the federal government, from the…

  • Backgrounder posted August 17, 2016 by Katie Tubb, Nicolas Loris, Paul Larkin The Energy Efficiency Free Market Act: A Step Toward Real Energy Efficiency

    The federal government has embarked on a troubling regulatory path, with the goal of making energy use and lifestyle choices on behalf of American families and businesses. Since the 1970s, Congress has empowered agencies to micromanage Americans’ energy use and override personal preferences through energy-efficiency mandates. With ever-shifting goals to forestall…

  • Backgrounder posted June 13, 2016 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D., Jack Spencer, Bridget Mudd, Katie Tubb Science Policy: Priorities and Reforms for the 45th President

    Federal involvement in science and technology is far-reaching, spanning all three branches of government. It has developed over decades from wartime objectives, layers of legislation, diverse presidential Administrations, and growing regulation. Federal participation in science and technology has aided the nation in meeting national security needs and exploring the…

  • Commentary posted May 25, 2016 by Katie Tubb Environmentalists in Blinders

    Extremely "green" activists have a strange way of going about improving the environment. Consider their behavior in the battle over a proposal to build a power plant in Kosovo. Kosovo gets its electricity from two power plants built when the southeastern European nation was part of Communist-run Yugoslavia. Back then, a state-owned corporation ran the plants and — in…

  • Issue Brief posted May 23, 2016 by Justin Bogie, Daren Bakst, Nicolas Loris, Katie Tubb House Energy and Water Appropriations Bill: Makes Progress but Could Do More to Cut Spending

    This week, the Energy and Water appropriations bill is expected to be debated on the House floor. The second of 12 appropriations bills providing discretionary funding for the federal government, the bill provides funding for projects under the direction of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Reclamation, the Department of Energy,…

  • Issue Brief posted May 13, 2016 by Anthony B. Kim, Katie Tubb Coal Plant Modernization: The Best Energy Option for Kosovo

    Since achieving its independence in 2008, the Republic of Kosovo has made progress toward stability and development. The once conflict-torn nation has been transitioning, albeit gradually, to a country that stands firmly for “stronger democracy, greater freedom, and growing economic potential.”[1] In facilitating Kosovo’s ongoing economic transformation, the U.S. should…

  • Issue Brief posted April 25, 2016 by Justin Bogie, Daren Bakst, Nicolas Loris, Katie Tubb 2017 Senate Energy and Water Appropriations: Bill Falls Short on Key Policies

    This week, the Energy and Water Development appropriations bill is expected to be debated on the Senate floor. The first of 12 appropriations bills providing discretionary funding for the federal government, the bill provides funding for projects under the direction of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Reclamation, the Department…

  • Backgrounder posted April 22, 2016 by David W. Kreutzer, Ph.D., Nicolas Loris, Katie Tubb, Kevin D. Dayaratna, Ph.D. The State of Climate Science: No Justification for Extreme Policies

    Hysteria over global warming is now pervasive in the federal government, driving not just the Obama Administration’s energy and environmental policies, but also those of nearly every federal department and agency.[1] Throughout his term in office, President Obama consistently has said that policy action to combat man-made global warming is imperative and urgent. On the…

  • Backgrounder posted March 22, 2016 by Katie Tubb, Jack Spencer Real Consent for Nuclear Waste Management Starts with a Free Market

    Last December, the Department of Energy (DOE) finally announced the next step in its plan to manage nuclear waste, as roughly outlined in its 2013 Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste.[1] In what the DOE characterized as a “critical step,” it opened a public comment period to gather input on how a new consent-based…

  • Issue Brief posted December 15, 2015 by Katie Tubb Solar’s Future Is Brighter Without Investment Tax Credit

    Despite years of growth in the solar industry, lobbyists are hard at work to get an extension of a tax subsidy they have known for seven years would be expiring next December. Solar power added 5.5 gigawatts of installed capacity in 2014, a 54 percent increase from the previous year, and constituting nearly half of all renewable electricity capacity installed nationwide,…

  • Backgrounder posted December 4, 2015 by Paul Winfree, Daren Bakst, Rachel Sheffield, James Phillips, Diane Katz, Nicolas Loris, Katie Tubb, Roger Severino, Sarah Torre, Lindsey Burke, James Sherk, Robert E. Moffit, Ph.D., Brett D. Schaefer, David Inserra Important Policy Riders for the FY 2016 Appropriations Bills

    The Constitution unequivocally grants Congress the exclusive power to appropriate funds for the “necessary and proper” operations of government.[1] James Madison wrote in The Federalist No. 58 that providing budgetary powers to Congress was a critical element in maintaining individual rights: “The power over the purse may, in fact, be regarded as the most complete and…

  • Commentary posted August 17, 2015 by Katie Tubb Let nuclear industry, not bureaucracy, manage spent fuel

    America has a growing nuclear waste problem — and it’s all the government’s fault. By law, the Department of Energy is supposed to collect spent nuclear fuel and deposit it at Nevada’s Yucca Mountain. Nuclear power customers in 33 states have paid billions of dollars into a federal fund to finance this service. Yet the DOE has never collected a single ounce of spent…