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  • Commentary posted September 23, 2008 by Andrew M. Grossman, Andrew Grossman A Tale of Two Hackers

    Consider two cases. In one, a suburban housewife posed as a teenage boy on MySpace to learn more about her daughter's on-again, off-again friend. In the other, a gang of computer geeks broke into the personal e-mail account of a vice-presidential candidate because they were seeking smear material. Here's the odd thing: In all likelihood, both - the housewife…

  • Commentary posted July 7, 2008 by Andrew M. Grossman, Andrew Grossman State Secrets? Who Needs 'Em?

    If Congress needed a kick in the pants to get moving on intelligence reform, this is it: A San Francisco judge ruled Wednesday that the federal government's program to spy on terrorists and their affiliates is not protected by the "state secrets" privilege. This means that government officials and companies that helped to implement the program may be forced…

  • Commentary posted June 30, 2008 by Andrew M. Grossman, Andrew Grossman An Individual Right Rekindled

    "Assuming that Heller is not disqualified from the exercise of Second Amendment rights [e.g., a felon], the District must permit him to register his handgun and must issue him a license to carry it in his home." So ordered the Supreme Court this morning. When the High Court decides matters of great national importance and interest, it is too easy to forget that its…

  • Commentary posted June 16, 2005 by Andrew Grossman Workers, Not Employers, Must Control Retirement Funds

    Employees of United Airlines recently got a frightening lesson in the "ownership society." The lesson was: If you don't own and control your retirement assets, they can be slashed or taken away at any time. A federal bankruptcy judge approved United's request to dump its pension plan into the Pension Benefit Guarantee Corp., a federal agency that takes over…

  • Commentary posted May 26, 2005 by Robert E. Moffit, Ph.D., Andrew Grossman Defusing the Medicare Time Bomb

    Newly hatched deficit hawks in Congress publicly sweat at the thought of supporting personal accounts for Social Security. But they overlook the big-ticket elephant in the entitlement-spending room. As Washington Post columnist Robert J. Samuelson recently noted, when Congress approved a drug entitlement for Medicare, it approved the largest single spending…

  • WebMemo posted May 6, 2005 by Tim Kane, Ph.D., Andrew Grossman Jobs, Growth, and the Washington Connection

    April was another strong month for jobs. According to Department of Labor numbers out this morning, the economy added 274,000 payroll jobs in April-across a myriad of industries-and the unemployment rate held steady at a low 5.2 percent. The timing of this report, coming the day after the Treasury made news by announcing that tax receipts are well ahead of schedule…

  • Backgrounder posted April 19, 2005 by Rea S. Hederman, Jr., Andrew Grossman Reversing the Bush Tax Cuts Would Not Fix Social Security

    Repealing the President's tax cuts to pay for Social Security would reduce economic growth, make Social Security an even worse deal for workers than it is already, and fail to address the growing problem of entitlement spending. Beyond these shortcomings, repealing the tax cuts would not even fix Social Secu­rity's finances. The Bush Tax Cuts In 2001 and…

  • WebMemo posted February 10, 2005 by Andrew Grossman Behind Social Security's Big Numbers

    Are we $26 trillion in the hole on Social Security? Or is it just $4.0 trillion? It is difficult to make sense of all the numbers floating around as people discuss Social Security reform. To do so, one needs to understand just what the most-cited measures of Social Security's future burden really mean.   (Updated on May 6, 2005, to 2005…

  • Commentary posted February 2, 2005 by Nina Owcharenko, Andrew Grossman Beginning of the End of Drug Re-Importation

    Could this be the beginning of the end of the debate over drug re-importation? Advocates of the practice argue that American consumers, particularly seniors, could benefit from legal re-importation of prescription drugs from abroad, which in some instances are sold at lower prices than in the United States. Opponents contend these lower prices result from price…

  • WebMemo posted January 13, 2005 by Rea S. Hederman, Jr., William W. Beach, Andrew Grossman The Unacceptable Costs of Raising Payroll Taxes to "Save" Social Security

    President Bush proposes to solve the problem of Social Security's unfunded liabilities by enacting a reform plan that includes personal retirement accounts (PRAs). Proponents of PRAs argue that this sort of reform would increase national savings, bolster employment, and improve economic growth, all while closing Social Security's funding gap. Opponents, such as…

  • WebMemo posted October 27, 2004 by Andrew Grossman Pro-Life Policy: Does It Make a Difference?

    Did the policies of the Clinton Administration cause a decrease in the abortion rate nationwide during the 1990s?   The decline in abortion rates during the 1990s has lead some to suggest that electing "pro-life" politicians does little to advance the cause of lowering the incidence of abortion. They posit that the link between abortion rates and economic…

  • Commentary posted October 22, 2004 by Andrew Grossman, Edmund F. Haislmaier The Flu-Vaccine Shortage: A Second Opinion

    "Your flu shots are canceled because this administration was unwilling to play straight with the American people." So said Sen. John Kerry. Overblown rhetoric aside, Sen. Kerry is right to fault the government for creating this problem. But the lesson that policymakers should take from the flu fiasco also argues against Kerry's own approach to prescription-drug…

  • WebMemo posted October 22, 2004 by Andrew Grossman, James L. Gattuso Google v. Microsoft: Trustbusters Not Needed

    Last week, Google, a company renowned for its search service, released the Google Desktop, a software program that lets users search through materials stored on their own computers, from e-mail to Word files to recently browsed Web pages. The Desktop is Google's first major foray onto the desktop, and its release may mark the beginning of the end of Microsoft's…

  • Center for Data Analysis Report posted October 21, 2004 by Tim Kane, Ph.D., Andrew Grossman, Rea S. Hederman, Jr., Kirk A. Johnson, Ph.D. Scorecard on the Economy: A Guide for Policymakers

    The U.S. economy has displayed a remark­able resilience following the 2001 recession. The economic slowdown of late 2000 that turned into a fully developed recession in early 2001 worsened with the terrorist attacks and corporate scandals late in the year. This economic "perfect storm" produced a sluggish economy that many experts, including Federal Reserve…

  • WebMemo posted September 21, 2004 by Andrew Grossman, Robert E. Moffit, Ph.D. Health Savings Accounts and the FEHBP: Perfect Together

    Some members of Congress want to deny federal workers new health benefits that are increasingly popular among workers in the private sector. But keeping Health Savings Accounts (HSAs) out of the Federal Employees Health Benefit Program (FEHBP) or unnecessarily encumbering them with restrictions would be to the detriment of federal employees. Congress should instead…