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  • Commentary posted May 27, 2016 by Robert E. Moffit, Ph.D. Congress Receiving Unconstitutional Obamacare Subsidies

    In our constitutional republic, it not only matters what officials do, but also how they do it. Constitutional policy ends can be pursued only by constitutional means. That understanding lies at the heart of the recent decision in United States House of Representatives v. Burwell. There, the Federal Court for the District of Columbia declared the Obama administration’s…

  • Backgrounder posted April 1, 2016 by Robert E. Moffit, Ph.D. Year Six of the Affordable Care Act: Obamacare’s Mounting Problems

    Americans are engaged in an intense national debate over the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (ACA, popularly known as “Obamacare”). Despite President Barack Obama’s glowing account of his “signature” accomplishment, the ACA’s six-year record demonstrates that the legislative product he signed into law is deeply—and in many respects irreparably—flawed.…

  • Testimony posted March 22, 2016 by Robert E. Moffit, Ph.D. Preserving and Protecting Medicare

    Testimony before Subcommittee on Health Committee on Ways and Means U.S. House of Representatives March 16, 2016 My name is Robert E. Moffit. I am Senior Fellow at The Heritage Foundation. The views I express in this testimony are my own and should not be construed as representing any official position of The Heritage Foundation. The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) has…

  • Issue Brief posted December 11, 2015 by Robert E. Moffit, Ph.D. Reducing Taxpayer Subsidies to Wealthy Medicare Recipients Is Sound Policy

    Medicare is accumulating an unfunded obligation of between $28 trillion and $37 trillion.[1] This is the dollar amount of promises to Medicare beneficiaries that are not financed with dedicated revenues. Although comprehensive Medicare reform is in order, one small step to alleviate this burden would be a further reduction in taxpayer subsidies to Medicare’s wealthy…

  • Backgrounder posted December 4, 2015 by Paul Winfree, Daren Bakst, Rachel Sheffield, James Phillips, Diane Katz, Nicolas Loris, Katie Tubb, Roger Severino, Sarah Torre, Lindsey Burke, James Sherk, Robert E. Moffit, Ph.D., Brett D. Schaefer, David Inserra Important Policy Riders for the FY 2016 Appropriations Bills

    The Constitution unequivocally grants Congress the exclusive power to appropriate funds for the “necessary and proper” operations of government.[1] James Madison wrote in The Federalist No. 58 that providing budgetary powers to Congress was a critical element in maintaining individual rights: “The power over the purse may, in fact, be regarded as the most complete and…

  • Commentary posted November 9, 2015 by Robert E. Moffit, Ph.D. Stop the Presses: Congress Did the Right Thing on Medicare

    The recent Boehner-Obama budget deal is bad public policy. Formally known as the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2015, it’s devoid of serious entitlement reform and allows the already crushing national debt to crash through a $18.1 trillion ceiling. Indeed, the debt literally jumped $339 billion the very same day President Obama signed the deal into law. But sometimes, even…

  • Issue Brief posted October 28, 2015 by Paul Winfree, Romina Boccia, Justin T. Johnson, Daren Bakst, Nicolas Loris, James L. Gattuso, Jason Snead, Rachel Greszler, Robert E. Moffit, Ph.D., David R. Burton, Curtis S. Dubay Analysis of the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2015

    The federal budget is on a dangerous trajectory and immediate corrective action is required. The U.S. national debt is at $18.1 trillion. According to the Congressional Budget Office (CBO), if the government remains on its currently planned course, it will spend $7 trillion more over the next 10 years than it will receive in taxes, piling on even more debt. Heritage…

  • Commentary posted September 22, 2015 by Robert E. Moffit, Ph.D. Washington’s boondoggle bandwagon: Obamacare’s co-op plans

    The Obama administration is perfecting the art of the “boondoggle” — a colorful term for a taxpayer-funded project characterized by wasteful spending, gross inefficiency, or political favoritism. William Safire, the late New York Times columnist, traced the word’s origins to 1935, when the New York City Council learned that Depression-relief funds were being used for…

  • Commentary posted July 31, 2015 by Robert E. Moffit, Ph.D. Medicare: Washington's Next Trillion-Dollar Trainwreck

    Medicare is still in trouble. The Medicare Trustees just issued their 2015 report. Like last year’s report, it says that the Hospital Insurance trust fund will enjoy a few years of surpluses, followed by deficits, ending in insolvency in 2030. The trustees’ report is a bracing corrective to the complacency and demagoguery that often mars the ongoing Medicare debate.…

  • Issue Brief posted July 30, 2015 by Robert E. Moffit, Ph.D. Medicare at 50: Reform Will Better Serve Seniors’ Health Care Needs

    Medicare, enacted along with Medicaid in 1965, is 50 years old.[1] The program, which provides health care services to seniors and some disabled, has successfully provided its enrollees core hospital and physicians’ coverage and a strong measure of financial security. However, fiscal and demographic problems that are inherent in its outdated structure threaten seniors’…

  • Commentary posted June 29, 2015 by Robert E. Moffit, Ph.D. America's Obamacare Nightmare Is Just Beginning

    Today the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the federal government could continue to subsidize health-insurance coverage through Healthcare.gov, the federal exchanges. An ecstatic President Obama declared that Obamacare is “here to stay.” No, it’s not. A judicial victory doesn’t automatically translate into a political victory, let alone a policy success. Once they’ve…

  • Commentary posted June 29, 2015 by Robert E. Moffit, Ph.D. Shed sunshine on ObamaCare's subsidies for Congress

    Sen. David Vitter (R-La.) has a simple question: How and why did Congress qualify as a "small business" eligible for special taxpayer subsidies under the Affordable Care Act (ACA)? For anyone in a real small business — private employers who get no such subsidies — the very idea is absurd. But getting a straight answer is as difficult as getting Lois Lerner's IRS…

  • Backgrounder posted May 28, 2015 by Alyene Senger, Robert E. Moffit, Ph.D. Medicare Advantage Under the ACA: Replace Payment Cuts with Market-Based Reforms

    Medicare Advantage (MA) offers seniors the option of private health plans as an alternative to traditional Medicare. The private plans in Medicare Advantage provide more comprehensive coverage and are typically more generous that traditional Medicare. Today, more than 30 percent of Medicare beneficiaries are enrolled in an MA plan. The Affordable Care Act of 2010 (ACA),…

  • Commentary posted May 5, 2015 by Robert E. Moffit, Ph.D. A Health Care Revolution on Private Exchanges?

    Employers, not politicians, can spark a health-care revolution. For many years employers have struggled with providing health insurance to workers and their families. Competing for high-skilled workers typically requires offering fairly comprehensive benefits (valued at an average of $6,000 for an individual in 2014). Public-sector employers — states and municipalities —…

  • Commentary posted April 21, 2015 by Robert E. Moffit, Ph.D., Paul Winfree Oops, Congress Failed Again: A Missed Opportunity to Fix Medicare

    The new Congress isn’t getting Washington’s crazy spending under control. In fact, it’s just made it worse. By enacting the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (H.R. 2), lawmakers yesterday increased the nation’s deficits by $141 billion over the next ten years and guaranteed even larger debt beyond that. So much for their formal commitments and resolutions to…