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  • Commentary posted January 6, 2007 by Daniel J. Mitchell, Ph.D. The IMF's Remarkably Shoddy Flat Tax Study

    The International Monetary Fund is supposed to help nations grow faster, but the international bureaucracy is frequently criticized because its officials often tell poor countries to raise taxes and devalue their currencies. This characterization may be a bit unfair, since the IMF has more sensible views on issues such as trade, regulation and privatization, but…

  • Play Movie Dan Mitchell on FOX Video Recorded on December 21, 2006 Dan Mitchell on FOX

    Dan Mitchell discusses the state of the economy on FOX.…

  • Commentary posted December 16, 2006 by Daniel J. Mitchell, Ph.D. The Benefits of Good Tax Policy

    International bureaucracies usually disdain free-market policies. So it's remarkable to see the World Bank issuing a new report, Paying Taxes: The Global Picture, that unambiguously endorses low tax rates, simple tax systems and even the Laffer Curve. The report, co-published with PriceWaterhouseCoopers, ranks business tax regimes in 175 nations. The Maldives,…

  • Play Movie Dan Mitchell on FOX Video Recorded on November 15, 2006 Dan Mitchell on FOX

    Dan Mitchell discusses tax rates on FOX.…

  • Play Movie Dan Mitchell on CNBC Video Recorded on November 13, 2006 Dan Mitchell on CNBC

    Dan Mitchell discusses tax rates on CNBC.…

  • Executive Summary posted October 25, 2006 by Daniel J. Mitchell, Ph.D. Executive Summary: Fiscal Policy Lessons from Europe

    The federal government spends an enormous amount of money. Measured as a share of national economic output, budgetary outlays are near a peacetime high, consuming almost 21 percent of gross domestic product (GDP). Whether it is mea­sured in nominal dollars, in inflation-adjusted (real) dollars, or on a per household basis, federal spending in America is at…

  • Backgrounder posted October 25, 2006 by Daniel J. Mitchell, Ph.D. Fiscal Policy Lessons from Europe

    The federal government spends an enormous amount of money. Measured as a share of national economic output, budgetary outlays are near a peace­time high, consuming almost 21 percent of gross domestic product (GDP).[1] Whether it is measured in nominal dollars, in inflation-adjusted (real) dollars, or on a per household basis, federal spending in America is at…

  • WebMemo posted October 13, 2006 by Daniel J. Mitchell, Ph.D. The 2006 Budget Numbers Show Impact of Pro-Growth Tax Policy, ButAlso Continued Spending Increases

    The Office of Management and Budget recently released final budget numbers for the 2006 fiscal year (FY2006), which began October 1, 2005 and ended September 30, 2006. These end-of-year numbers are particularly noteworthy because they show pro-growth tax rate reductions, such as those made in 2003 tax legislation, do boost growth and thus expand taxable income,…

  • Backgrounder posted September 28, 2006 by Daniel J. Mitchell, Ph.D., Michelle Muccio Tax Rate Reductions Strengthen the Economy, But Excessive Government Spending Threatens Long-Run Performance

    The American economy is strong. Per capita eco­nomic output is at record levels, the unemployment rate is low, and national wealth is climbing. Indeed, the U.S. economy is the envy of the developed world. America's economy is doing comparatively well in large part because the burden of government is small, especially compared to the burden of the public sec­tor in…

  • WebMemo posted September 21, 2006 by Daniel J. Mitchell, Ph.D. Hoping to Restore Growth, Voters Rebel Against Sweden's High-TaxWelfare State

    In a stunning setback, Sweden's Social Democrats were ousted from power in Sunday's election after receiving their lowest share of the vote since 1914. This result is somewhat surprising since Sweden, at least by European standards, is experiencing decent economic growth and modest levels of unemployment.   A closer examination, however, reveals that the…

  • Backgrounder posted July 28, 2006 by Daniel J. Mitchell, Ph.D., Stuart M. Butler, Ph.D. What Is Really Happening to Government Revenues: Long-Run Forecasts Show Sharp Rise in Tax Burden

    Given the political and media discussion of deficits and taxes, Americans might reasonably assume that deep tax cuts are causing today's deficits and, more important, will cause huge long-term deficits. While it is widely understood that spending on retirement programs will increase as the baby boomers retire, it is also commonly believed that the Bush tax cuts mean…

  • Commentary posted July 25, 2006 by Daniel J. Mitchell, Ph.D. IRS snooping a bad augury

    Are your tax records safe? Good question.  The Treasury Department last month admitted investigating thousands of cases of IRS employees improperly snooping through taxpayer records. And although this led to 1,600 "adverse personnel actions" and 126 criminal prosecutions, Treasury officials concede "there has not been a noticeable decrease" over the last eight…

  • Commentary posted June 29, 2006 by Daniel J. Mitchell, Ph.D. Tax Me Once, Shame on You...  Tax Me Twice and the System Needs Fixing.

    Globalization is sending tax rates tumbling across the world, as jobs and capital migrate across borders in search of lower and more equitable taxation regimes. That makes it all the more imperative not only to roll back the recent tax increases on U.S. expatriates, but to eliminate double-taxation of overseas Americans altogether. Thankfully, there's a new bill…

  • Commentary posted June 7, 2006 by Daniel J. Mitchell, Ph.D. What Paulson needs to do

    Assuming no unexpected surprises on the road to confirmation, Henry M. Paulson Jr. of Goldman Sachs will soon be America's next Treasury secretary. Some observers wonder why Paulson agreed to leave a prestigious Wall Street position to serve in the last couple of years of a lame-duck administration, but many big policy decisions have yet to be made. A strong…

  • Commentary posted May 31, 2006 by Daniel J. Mitchell, Ph.D. Strong growth of economy no coincidence

    Almost lost in the clamor over illegal immigration, Americans got some good economic news last week when President Bush signed legislation that will extend the 15 percent tax rate on dividends and capital gains through 2010. It would have been even better to simply make these cuts permanent, but a two-year extension is a good start. Ever since the cuts…