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  • Commentary posted January 13, 2016 by Edmund F. Haislmaier Obamacare Lessons From UnitedHealth

    The nation's largest health insurer, UnitedHealth Group, surprised investors last month. The company revealed that it was incurring substantial losses on the Obamacare exchanges — and that, consequently, it would scale back marketing its exchange plans in 2016 and possibly exit the exchanges in 2017. The poor results for United's exchange business seem to have taken even…

  • Testimony posted October 16, 2015 by Edmund F. Haislmaier Effects on Competition of Proposed Health Insurer Mergers

    Testimony before Committee on the Judiciary Subcommittee on Regulatory Reform, Commercial and Antitrust Law United States House of Representatives Edmund F. Haislmaier Senior Research Fellow in Health Policy The Heritage Foundation September 29, 2015 Mr. Chairman and Members of the committee, thank you for inviting me to testify. My name is Edmund F. Haislmaier and I am…

  • Backgrounder posted October 15, 2015 by Edmund F. Haislmaier, Drew Gonshorowski 2014 Health Insurance Enrollment: Increase Due Almost Entirely to Medicaid Expansion

    Last year’s changes in health insurance enrollment are of particular interest, as 2014 was the year in which key provisions of the Affordable Care Act (ACA, or Obamacare) took effect—most notably, the offering of subsidies for coverage purchased through the new government exchanges and the ACA’s Medicaid expansion. Analysis of enrollment data for private health insurance…

  • Issue Brief posted July 23, 2015 by Edmund F. Haislmaier, Nina Owcharenko States Should Start Planning Now for the Post-ACA World

    When the Supreme Court handed down its decision in King v. Burwell upholding the Obama Administration’s interpretation of the law, some concluded that the intense debate over the Affordable Care Act (ACA or Obamacare) was coming to an end. Not surprisingly, President Barack Obama encouraged that interpretation in his response to the Court’s decision, saying that “the…

  • Issue Brief posted May 4, 2015 by Edmund F. Haislmaier, Drew Gonshorowski Responding to King v. Burwell: Congress’s First Step Should Be to Remove Costly Mandates Driving Up Premiums

    The Supreme Court is expected to issue its decision in King v. Burwell before the end of June. Should the Court reject the Obama Administration’s regulatory interpretation of the provisions of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) at issue in the case, the Treasury would be barred from paying health insurance subsidies to individuals who obtained coverage thorough Healthcare.gov,…

  • Issue Brief posted March 30, 2015 by Edmund F. Haislmaier King v. Burwell: A Loss of Subsidy Does Not Mean a Loss of Coverage

    An important distinction is getting lost in commentary on the possible effects of a Supreme Court decision in the case of King v. Burwell. It is the distinction between how the Court’s ruling would affect “insurance subsidies” versus how it would affect “insurance coverage.” Should the Court reject the Obama Administration’s regulatory interpretation of the provisions of…

  • Issue Brief posted March 5, 2015 by Edmund F. Haislmaier King v. Burwell: What State Lawmakers Should Do

    State lawmakers—particularly those in states that would be affected by a Supreme Court ruling against the Obama Administration in the King case—should take steps to encourage Congress to put forth a legislative response to the case, specifically by exempting affected states from the costly Obamacare rules, regulations, and mandates.[1] Reject a State Exchange State…

  • Issue Brief posted February 27, 2015 by Nina Owcharenko, Edmund F. Haislmaier King v. Burwell: An Opportunity for Congress and the States to Clear Away Obamacare’s Failed Policies

    On March 4, the Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in King v. Burwell—a case challenging the Obama Administration’s IRS ruling granting premium support subsidies to those enrolled in federal exchanges under the Affordable Care Act (ACA). While a ruling against the Administration would preclude paying those subsidies to individuals who obtain coverage through the…

  • Issue Brief posted February 20, 2015 by Edmund F. Haislmaier Impact of King v. Burwell: The ACA’s Key Design Flaws

    On March 4, the Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in King v. Burwell, a challenge to an IRS ruling related to the Affordable Care Act (ACA) granting premium support subsidies to those enrolled in federal exchanges. While claims that a ruling in favor of King would disrupt coverage to millions,[1] it is important to recognize that the ultimate source of any…

  • Issue Brief posted February 20, 2015 by Edmund F. Haislmaier King v. Burwell: Assessing the Claimed Effects of a Decision for the Plaintiffs

    Should the Supreme Court rule in King v. Burwell—a case challenging the Obama Administration’s implementation of the premium tax credit provisions of the Affordable Care Act (ACA)—that the statute restricts the payment of premium tax credits only to individuals obtaining coverage “through an Exchange established by [a] State,” its ruling would preclude the Treasury paying…

  • Backgrounder posted January 29, 2015 by Edmund F. Haislmaier, Drew Gonshorowski Q3 2014 Health Insurance Enrollment: Employer Coverage Continues to Decline, Medicaid Keeps Growing

    During the third quarter (Q3) of 2014, enrollment in employer-sponsored coverage continued to decline, while Medicaid enrollment continued to grow. However, enrollment in individual-market plans—which substantially increased in both of the first two quarters—also declined by 357,000 during the third quarter. The net result was that total enrollment decreased by 160,000…

  • Commentary posted December 11, 2014 by Edmund F. Haislmaier Should Obamacare be Repealed, Replaced or Left Alone?

    In the wake of Republican mid-term electoral victories, and with support for the President’s health care law registering new lows in the Gallup survey, it is time to consider what a “repeal and replace” strategy for Obamacare might actually look like. While it is true that the politics and timing remain fluid, it is still possible to outline substantive changes. At the…

  • Commentary posted November 6, 2014 by Edmund F. Haislmaier The Truth Behind Obamacare Numbers

    As a presidential candidate, Barack Obama promised that his health reform plan would "lower premiums by up to $2,500 for a typical family." So it's not surprising that many people are dismayed by the rising costs under the health reform law he subsequently signed. But the president and the lawmakers who created Obamacare were always far more focused on increasing…

  • Backgrounder posted October 30, 2014 by Edmund F. Haislmaier, Robert E. Moffit, Ph.D., Nina Owcharenko, Alyene Senger A Fresh Start for Health Care Reform

    Despite President Barack Obama’s insistence that the national health care debate is over, and that he will not “re-litigate” the misnamed Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA), the practical concerns, aggravated by implementation glitches and policy failures, guarantee that the debate over the PPACA is far from over.[1] In the next phase of the health care…

  • Backgrounder posted October 22, 2014 by Edmund F. Haislmaier, Drew Gonshorowski Obamacare’s Enrollment Increase: Mainly Due to Medicaid Expansion

    W‌ith enrollment data now available for the second quarter ‌of 2014, it is possible to construct a complete picture of the changes in health insurance coverage that occurred during the initial implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA), commonly known as Obamacare. The data show that in the first half of 2014, private health insurance…