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  • Executive Summary posted August 25, 1999 by Bryan T. Johnson Executive Summary: The New Space Race: Challenges for U.S. National Security and Free Enterprise

    Thirty years ago, when astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin stepped on the moon, they broke the tethers binding mankind's feet to Earth and lofted the nation's aspirations and energies into space. Today, as the nation celebrates the 30th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission, Congress is considering legislation that will chart the future course of America's…

  • Backgrounder posted August 25, 1999 by Bryan T. Johnson The New Space Race: Challenges for U.S. National Security and Free Enterprise

    Thirty years ago, when Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin stepped on the moon, they broke the tethers binding mankind's feet to Earth and lofted the nation's aspirations and energies into space. As the nation celebrates the 30th anniversary of the lunar landing, which occurred less than a decade after President John F. Kennedy challenged scientists…

  • Executive Summary posted February 19, 1999 by Adam D. Thierer, Bryan T. Johnson Executive Summary: Why Congress Must Fix the Satellite Home Viewer Act

    The satellite industry is one of the fastest growing and most important high-technology sectors of today's U.S. economy. It provides, among other things, communications, television, cable, and sophisticated imagery and sensory satellites for U.S. intelligence-gathering operations. Over the past decade, home satellite subscriptions for television service have…

  • Backgrounder posted February 19, 1999 by Adam D. Thierer, Bryan T. Johnson Why Congress Must Fix the Satellite Home Viewer Act

    Congress is scheduled to consider the Satellite Television Act of 1999 (S. 303), legislation that will help decide the future of one of America's most competitive and technologically important industries: satellite television broadcasting. The satellite industry includes many services, from delivering cellular phone service and television broadcasting to…

  • Executive Memorandum posted February 15, 1999 by Bryan T. Johnson, Brett D. Schaefer Clinton's Backdoor Foreign Aid Increase

    On February 1, 1999, in his fiscal year (FY) 2000 budget proposal, President Bill Clinton submitted a supplemental appropriations request for FY 1999. He seeks $1.9 billion in foreign aid in support of the October 1998 Israeli-Palestinian agreement signed at Wye River, Maryland, as well as funds for several small requests, such as roughly $1 million to…

  • Backgrounder posted November 25, 1998 by Bryan T. Johnson, Brett D. Schaefer IMF Reform? Setting the Record Straight

    Congress has been pressured by the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the Clinton Administration, and various domestic interests since January 1997 to provide the IMF with additional funds. It resisted the pressure to rubber-stamp these requests and chose instead to conduct an informative debate on many IMF-related issues before finally approving $17.9 billion…

  • Backgrounder posted July 16, 1998 by Bryan T. Johnson, Brett D. Schaefer A Checklist for IMF Reform

    The House of Representatives soon is likely to consider the Clinton Administration's request for $17.9 billion in additional funding for the International Monetary Fund (IMF).2 The Senate approved this request on March 26, 1998; and even though it expressed support for requiring some reform by the IMF in return for the new appropriation, it neglected the most basic…

  • Backgrounder posted May 11, 1998 by Bryan T. Johnson, Brett D. Schaefer Agricultural Exports and The IMF: Separating Myth From Reality

    The Clinton Administration is pressuring Congress to appropriate an additional $18 billion in funding for the International Monetary Fund (IMF). Supporters of this increase believe that the IMF is a necessary tool to stabilize markets, establish strong and stable currencies, solve the recent Asian financial crisis, and open foreign markets to trade. However, not one…

  • Executive Memorandum posted April 27, 1998 by Bryan T. Johnson, Brett D. Schaefer Clinton's Foreign Assistance Budget: Over the Top and Down the Drain

    The Clinton Administration is asking Congress to increase bilateral economic and development assistance in fiscal year (FY) 1999 by $531 million--almost 6.4 percent more for a program that historically has been ineffective. The Administration's request is unjustified. Numerous studies of the economies of countries that received U.S. economic aid for the past 35…

  • Backgrounder posted February 12, 1998 by Bryan T. Johnson, Brett D. Schaefer Congress Should Give No More Funds to the IMF

    President Clinton is gearing up for a battle with Congress over increased United States funding for the International Monetary Fund (IMF). The IMF-led $118 billion bailout of Asian economies and IMF demands for substantial funding increases have prompted Congress to question both the efficacy of financial bailouts and the relevance of the Fund in today's global…

  • Backgrounder posted January 26, 1998 by Bryan T. Johnson The International Responsibility and Self Sufficiency Act

    The U.S. foreign aid program was created to promote economic development in less-developed countries, to achieve U.S. foreign policy and security interests abroad, and to open overseas markets to American exports. Since 1945, the United States has spent nearly $500 billion (more than $1 trillion in constant 1995 dollars)1 to achieve these goals. Yet this sizable…

  • Backgrounder posted December 5, 1997 by Bryan T. Johnson, John Sweeney Down the Drain:  Why the IMF Bailout in Asia Is Wasteful andWon't Work

    The International Monetary Fund (IMF) is bailing out Indonesia, Thailand, the Philippines, and South Korea, the world's 11th-largest economy. The current estimated cost of these four financial rescue projects is $118 billion, but many financial analysts fear this amount could rise to as much as $163 billion-about five times more than it cost the IMF and the…

  • Backgrounder posted May 6, 1997 by Bryan T. Johnson The International Monetary Fund: Outdated, Ineffective, andUnnecessary

    Introduction Founded 53 years ago in the turbulent era of the 1940s to stabilize the world economy, the International Monetary Fund (IMF)1 has become outdated, ineffective, and unnecessary. Most of the economic conditions that led to the IMF's creation no longer exist; in addition, the Fund has failed to achieve most of its own newly defined roles, a preponderance…

  • Commentary posted April 24, 1997 by Bryan T. Johnson ED042497a: U.S. Not Getting It's Money's Worth

    In the battle over whether to cut funding for America's foreign-aid program -- and its main dispenser of funds, the Agency for International Development (AID) -- the Clinton administration always insists cuts would be a mistake. Foreign aid, the White House claims, helps the United States gain influence with countries around the world and builds to gaining…

  • Backgrounder posted January 31, 1997 by Bryan T. Johnson, Brett D. Schaefer False Alarm Over Foreign Affairs Spending Cuts

    Charts and Tables: Chart 1: Funding for Diplomatic Activities 1980-1997 Chart 2: State Department Funding 1980-1997 Chart 3: Funding for Overall Foreign Affairs Budget vs. Funding for its Non-Diplomatic Functions The Clinton Administration claims that a declining foreign affairs budget is threatening the ability of the United States to conduct…